72 Works

Data from: Habitat-driven population structure of bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, in the North-East Atlantic

Marie Louis, Amélia Viricel, Tamara Lucas, Hélène Peltier, Eric Alfonsi, Simon Berrow, Andrew Brownlow, Pablo Covelo, Willy Dabin, Rob Deaville, Renaud De Stephanis, François Gally, Pauline Gauffier, Rod Penrose, Monica A. Silva, Christophe Guinet & Benoît Simon-Bouhet
Despite no obvious barrier to gene flow, historical environmental processes and ecological specializations can lead to genetic differentiation in highly mobile animals. Ecotypes emerged in several large mammal species as a result of niche specializations and/or social organization. In the North-West Atlantic, two distinct bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) ecotypes (i.e. ‘coastal’ and ‘pelagic’) have been identified. Here, we investigated the genetic population structure of North-East Atlantic (NEA) bottlenose dolphins on a large scale through the...

Data from: The dynamics of niche evolution upon abrupt environmental change

Romain Gallet, Yasmin Latour, Bradley Stephen Hughes & Thomas Lenormand
Abrupt environmental changes are of particular interest to understand how species can quickly evolve at the boundary of their current niche. In particular the ‘sliding niche’ model, wherein a niche shifts globally toward the new condition, has been utilized in understanding and modeling this process. Here, we investigate the dynamics of relative fitness change in four evolutionary replicates of Escherichia coli populations exposed to an extreme pH shift. We analyzed these changes at generations 500,...

Data from: Reduced survival and reproductive success generates selection pressure for the dengue mosquito Aedes aegypti to evolve resistance against infection by the microsporidian parasite Vavraia culicis

Victoria E. Sy, Philip Agnew, Christine Sidobre & Yannis Michalakis
The success and sustainability of control measures aimed at reducing the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases will depend on how they influence the fitness of mosquitoes in targeted populations. We investigated the effects of the microsporidian parasite Vavraia culicis on the survival, blood-feeding behaviour and reproductive success of female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the main vector of dengue. Infection reduced survival to adulthood and increased adult female mosquito age-dependent mortality relative to uninfected individuals; this additional mortality...

Data from: Bouldering: an alternative strategy to long-vertical climbing in root-climbing hortensias

Carolina Granados Mendoza, Sandrine Isnard, Tristan Charles-Dominique, Jan Van Den Bulcke, Nick P. Rowe, Joris Van Acker, Paul Goetghebeur & Marie-Stéphanie Samain
In the Neotropics, the genus Hydrangea of the popular ornamental hortensia family is represented by climbing species that strongly cling to their support surface by means of adhesive roots closely positioned along specialized anchoring stems. These root-climbing hortensia species belong to the nearly exclusive American Hydrangea section Cornidia and generally are long lianescent climbers that mostly flower and fructify high in the host tree canopy. The Mexican species Hydrangea seemannii, however, encompasses not only long...

Data from: Blacktip reef sharks, Carcharhinus melanopterus, have high genetic structure and varying demographic histories in their Indo-Pacific range

Thomas M. Vignaud, Johann Mourier, Jeffrey A. Maynard, Raphael Leblois, Julia L. Y. Spaet, Eric Clua, Valentina Neglia, Serge Planes & Julia L.Y. Spaet
For free-swimming marine species like sharks, only population genetics and demographic history analyses can be used to assess population health/status as baseline population numbers are usually unknown. We investigated the population genetics of blacktip reef sharks, Carcharhinus melanopterus; one of the most abundant reef-associated sharks and the apex predator of many shallow water reefs of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Our sampling includes 4 widely separated locations in the Indo-Pacific and 11 islands in French...

Data from: How Ebola impacts social dynamics in gorillas: a multistate modelling approach.

Céline Genton, Amandine Pierre, Romane Cristescu, Florence Lévréro, Sylvain Gatti, Jean-Sébastien Pierre, Nelly Ménard & Pascaline Le Gouar
Emerging infectious diseases can induce rapid changes in population dynamics and threaten population persistence. In socially structured populations, the transfers of individuals between social units, e.g. from breeding groups to non-breeding groups, shape population dynamics. We suggest that diseases may affect these crucial transfers. We aimed to determine how disturbance by an emerging disease affects demographic rates of gorillas, especially transfer rates within populations and immigration rates into populations. We compared social dynamics and key...

Data from: Use of RAD sequencing for delimiting species

Eric Pante, Jawad Abdelkrim, Amelia Viricel, Delphine Gey, Scott France, Marie-Catherine Boisselier & Sarah Samadi
RAD-tag sequencing is a promising method for conducting genome-wide evolutionary studies. However, to date, only a handful of studies empirically tested its applicability above the species level. In this communication, we use RAD tags to contribute to the delimitation of species within a diverse genus of deep-sea octocorals, Chrysogorgia, for which few classical genetic markers have proved informative. Previous studies have hypothesized that single mitochondrial haplotypes can be used to delimit Chrysogorgia species. On the...

Data from: Life-history trait database of European reptile species

Annegret Grimm, Ana María Prieto Ramírez, Sylvain Moulherat, Julie Reynaud & Klaus Henle
Life-history data are essential for providing answers to a wide range of questions in evolution, ecology, and conservation biology. While life history data for many species, especially plants, are available online, life history traits of European reptiles are available only widely scattered in different languages and primarily in printed media. For this reason, we generated a comprehensive trait database covering all European reptile species. Data were compiled by searching the peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed literature. The...

Data from: Avian top predator and the landscape of fear: responses of mammalian mesopredators to risk imposed by the golden eagle

Mari S. Lyly, Alexandre Villers, Elina Koivisto, Pekka Helle, Tuomo Ollila & Erkki Korpimäki
Top predators may induce extensive cascading effects on lower trophic levels, for example, through intraguild predation (IGP). The impacts of both mammalian and avian top predators on species of the same class have been extensively studied, but the effects of the latter upon mammalian mesopredators are not yet as well known. We examined the impact of the predation risk imposed by a large avian predator, the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos, L.), on its potential mammalian...

Data from: Additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in growth trajectories in a wild cooperative mammal

Elise Huchard, Anne Charmantier, Sinead English, Andrew Bateman, Johanna F. Nielsen & Tim Clutton-Brock
Individual variation in growth is high in cooperative breeders and may reflect plastic divergence in developmental trajectories leading to breeding vs. helping phenotypes. However, the relative importance of additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in shaping growth trajectories is largely unknown in cooperative vertebrates. This study exploits weekly sequences of body mass from birth to adulthood to investigate sources of variance in, and covariance between, early and later growth in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta), a...

Data from: Short-term variations in gene flow related to cyclic density fluctuations in the common vole

Bertrand Gauffre, Karine Berthier, Pablo Inchausti, Yannick Chaval, Jean-François Cosson & Vincent Bretagnolle
In highly fluctuating populations with complex social systems genetic patterns are likely to vary in space and time due to demographic and behavioural processes. Cyclic rodents are extreme examples of demographically instable populations that often exhibit strong social organisation. In such populations, kin structure and spacing behaviour may vary with density fluctuations and impact both the composition and spatial structure of genetic diversity. In this study, we analysed the multiannual genetic structure of a cyclic...

Data from: Spatial genetic structure in Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima and Beta macrocarpa reveals the effect of contrasting mating system, influence of marine currents and footprints of postglacial recolonisation routes

Marie Leys, Eric J. Petit, Yasmina El-Bahloul, Camille Liso, Sylvain Fournet & Jean-Francois Arnaud
Understanding the factors that contribute to population genetic divergence across a species' range is a long-standing goal in evolutionary biology and ecological genetics. We examined the relative importance of historical and ecological features in shaping the present-day spatial patterns of genetic structure in two related plant species, Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima and Beta macrocarpa. Using nuclear and mitochondrial markers, we surveyed 93 populations from Brittany (France) to Morocco – the southern limit of their species'...

Data from: Contrasting genetic diversity patterns in two sister kelp species co-distributed along the coast of Brittany, France

Marine Robuchon, Line Le Gall, Stéphane Mauger & Myriam Valero
We investigated patterns of genetic structure in two sister kelp species to explore how distribution width along the shore, zonation, latitudinal distribution and historical factors contribute to contrasting patterns of genetic diversity. We implemented a hierarchical sampling scheme to compare patterns of genetic diversity and structure in these two kelp species co-distributed along the coasts of Brittany (France) using a total of 12 microsatellites, 9 for Laminaria hyperborea and 11 for Laminaria digitata, of which...

Data from: Short- and long-term effects of litter size manipulation in a small wild-derived rodent

Mikko Lehto Hürlimann, Antoine Stier, Olivier Scholly, François Crisuolo, Pierre Bize, M. Lehto Hurlimann & F. Criscuolo
Iteroparous organisms maximise their overall fitness by optimising their reproductive effort over multiple reproductive events. Hence, changes in reproductive effort are expected to have both short- and long-term consequences on parents and their offspring. In laboratory rodents, manipulation of reproductive efforts during lactation have however revealed little short-term reproductive adjustments, suggesting that female laboratory rodents might express maximal rather than optimal levels of reproductive investments as observed in semelparous organisms. Using a litter size manipulation...

Data from: Microbiome affects egg carotenoid investment, nestling development and adult oxidative costs of reproduction in Great tits

Staffan Jacob, Nathalie Parthuisot, Armelle Vallat, Felipe Ramon-Portugal, Fabrice Helfenstein & Philipp Heeb
1. Parasites influence allocation trade-offs between reproduction and self-maintenance and consequently shape host life-history traits. The host microbiome includes pathogenic and commensal micro-organisms that are remarkable in their diversity and ubiquity. However, experimental studies investigating whether the microbiome shapes host reproduction are still lacking. 2. In this study, we tested whether the microbiome affects three important components of bird reproduction, namely (i) the maternal transfer of anti-microbial compounds to the eggs, (ii) the development of...

Data from: Do mites evolving in alternating host plants adapt to host switch?

Sara Magalhães, Aurelie Cailleau, Elodie Blanchet & Isabelle Olivieri
A fluctuating environment may be perceived as a composition of different environments, or as an environment per se, in which it is the fluctuation itself that poses a selection pressure. If so, then organisms may adapt to this alternation. We tested this using experimental populations of spider mites that have been evolving for 45 generations in a homogeneous environment (pepper or tomato plants), or in a heterogeneous environment composed of an alternation of these two...

Data from: Early life expenditure in sexual competition is associated with increased reproductive senescence in male red deer

Jean-François Lemaître, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Josephine M. Pemberton, Tim H. Clutton-Brock, Daniel H. Nussey, J.-F. Lemaitre & J.-M. Gaillard
The evolutionary theories of senescence predict that investment in reproduction in early life should come at the cost of reduced somatic maintenance, and thus earlier or more rapid senescence. There is now growing support for such trade-offs in wild vertebrates, but these exclusively come from females. Here, we test this prediction in male red deer (Cervus elaphus) using detailed longitudinal data collected over a 40-year field study. We show that males which had larger harems...

Data from: Dispersal propensity in Tetrahymena thermophila ciliates – a reaction norm perspective

Frank Pennekamp, Katherine A. Mitchell, Alexis Serge Chaine, Nicolas Schtickzelle & Alexis Chaine
Dispersal and phenotypic plasticity are two main ways for species to deal with rapid changes of their environments. Understanding how genotypes (G), environments (E) and their interaction (genotype and environment; G x E) each affects dispersal propensity is therefore instrumental for predicting the ecological and evolutionary responses of species under global change. Here we used an actively dispersing ciliate to quantify the contributions of G, E, and G x E on dispersal propensity, exposing 44...

Data from: Senescence or selective disappearance? Age trajectories of body mass in wild and captive populations of a small-bodied primate

Anni Hämäläinen, Melanie Dammhahn, Fabienne Aujard, Manfred Eberle, Isabelle Hardy, Peter M. Kappeler, Martine Perret, Susanne Schliehe-Diecks, Cornelia Kraus & A. Hamalainen
Classic theories of ageing consider extrinsic mortality (EM) a major factor in shaping longevity and ageing, yet most studies of functional ageing focus on species with low EM. This bias may cause overestimation of the influence of senescent declines in performance over condition-dependent mortality on demographic processes across taxa. To simultaneously investigate the roles of functional senescence (FS) and intrinsic, extrinsic and condition-dependent mortality in a species with a high predation risk in nature, we...

Data from: Gradual adaptation of bone structure to aquatic lifestyle in extinct sloths from Peru

Eli Amson, Christian De Muizon, Michel Laurin, Christiane Argot, Vivian De Buffrénil & V. De Buffrenil
Non-pathological densification (osteosclerosis) and swelling (pachyostosis) of bones are the main modifications affecting the skeleton of land vertebrates (tetrapods) that returned to water. However, a precise temporal calibration of the acquisition of such adaptations is still wanting. Here, we assess the timing of such acquisition using the aquatic sloth Thalassocnus, from the Neogene of the Pisco Formation, Peru. This genus is represented by five species occurring in successive vertebrate-bearing horizons of distinct ages. It yields...

Data from: Gene-dosage effects on fitness in recent adaptive duplications: ace-1 in the mosquito Culex pipiens

Pierrick Labbé, Pascal Milesi, André Yébakima, Nicole Pasteur, Mylène Weill & Thomas Lenormand
Gene duplications have long been advocated to contribute to the evolution of new functions. The role of selection in their early spread is more controversial. Unless duplications are favored for a direct benefit of increased expression, they are likely detrimental. In this paper, we investigated the case of duplications favored because they combine already functionally divergent alleles. Their gene-dosage/fitness relations are poorly known, because selection may operate on both overall expression and duplicates relative dosage....

Data from: Mating systems and selection efficacy: a test using chloroplastic sequence data in Angiosperms

Sylvain Glémin & Aline Muyle
Selfing is assumed to reduce selection efficacy, especially purifying selection. This can be tested using molecular data, for example by comparing the Dn/Ds ratio between selfing and outcrossing lineages. So far, little evidence of relaxed selection against weakly deleterious mutations (as inferred by a higher Dn/Ds ratio) in selfers as compared to outcrossers has been found, contrary to the pattern often observed between asexual and sexual lineages. However, few groups have been studied to date....

Data from: Environmental DNA surveillance for invertebrate species: advantages and technical limitations to detect invasive crayfish Procambarus clarkii in freshwater ponds

Anne Tréguier, Jean-Marc Paillisson, Tony Dejean, Alice Valentini, Martin A. Schlaepfer & Jean-Marc Roussel
1. The introduction of non-native species is a major threat to biodiversity. While eradication programs of well-established invaders are costly and hazardous for non-target species, the early detection of a non-native species at low density is critical for preventing biological invasions in recipient ecosystems. Recent studies reveal that environmental DNA (eDNA) is a powerful tool for detecting target species in aquatic ecosystems, but these studies focus mostly on fish and amphibians. 2. We examine the...

Data from: Epistasis and allele specificity in the emergence of a stable polymorphism in Escherichia coli

Jessica Plucain, Thomas Hindré, Mickaël Le Gac, Olivier Tenaillon, Stéphane Cruveiller, Claudine Médigue, Nicholas Leiby, William R. Harcombe, Christopher J. Marx, Richard E. Lenski & Dominique Schneider
Ecological opportunities promote population divergence into coexisting lineages. However, the genetic mechanisms that enable new lineages to exploit these opportunities are poorly understood except in cases of single mutations. We examined how two Escherichia coli lineages diverged from their common ancestor at the outset of a long-term coexistence. By sequencing genomes and reconstructing the genetic history of one lineage, we showed that three mutations together were sufficient to produce the frequency-dependent fitness effects that allowed...

Data from: Overcompensation and phase effects in a cyclic common vole population: between first and second-order cycles

Frédéric Barraquand, Adrien Pinot, Nigel G. Yoccoz & Vincent Bretagnolle
1. Population cycles in voles are often thought to be generated by one-year delayed density-dependence on the annual population growth rate. In common voles, however, it has been suggested by Turchin (2003) that some populations exhibit first-order cycles, resulting from strong overcompensation (i.e. carrying capacity overshoots in peak years, with only an effect of the current year abundance on annual growth rates). 2. We focus on a common vole (Microtus arvalis) population from western France,...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    72

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    72

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    72
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    5
  • University of Cambridge
    4
  • University of Montpellier
    4
  • Centre de Biologie et de Gestion des Populations
    4
  • University of Lausanne
    3
  • Paul Sabatier University
    3
  • Centre national de la recherche scientifique
    2
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    2
  • Ghent University
    2