120 Works

Data from: Beyond magic traits: multimodal mating cues in Heliconius butterflies

Claire Mérot, Brigitte Frérot, Ene Leppik & Mathieu Joron
Species coexistence involves the evolution of reproductive barriers opposing gene flow. Heliconius butterflies display colorful patterns affecting mate choice and survival through warning signaling and mimicry. These patterns are called “magic traits” for speciation because divergent natural selection may promote mimicry shifts in pattern whose role as mating cue facilitates reproductive isolation. By contrast, between comimetic species, natural selection promotes pattern convergence. We addressed whether visual convergence interferes with reproductive isolation by testing for sexual...

Data from: Identification of a bacterial pathogen associated with Porites white patch syndrome in the Western Indian Ocean

Mathieu G. Séré, Pablo Tortosa, Pascale Chabanet, Jean-Pascal Quod, Michael J. Sweet & Michael H. Schleyer
Porites white patch syndrome (PWPS) is a coral disease recently described in the western Indian Ocean. This study aimed to isolate and identify potential pathogens associated with PWPS utilising both culture and non-culture screening techniques and inoculation trials. A total of 14 bacterial strains (those dominant in disease lesions, absent or rare in healthy tissues and considered potential pathogens in a previous study) were cultured and used to experimentally inoculate otherwise healthy individuals in an...

Data from: Evidence for carry-over effects of predator exposure on pathogen transmission potential

Olivier Roux, Amelie Vantaux, Benjamin Roche, Koudraogo B. Yameogo, Kounbobr R. Dabiré, Abdoulaye Diabaté, Frederic Simard & Thierry Lefevre
Accumulating evidence indicates that species interactions such as competition and predation can indirectly alter interactions with other community members, including parasites. For example, presence of predators can induce behavioral defenses in the prey, resulting in a change in susceptibility to parasites. Such predator-induced phenotypic changes may be especially pervasive in prey with discrete larval and adult stages for which exposure to predators during larval development can have strong carry-over effects on adult phenotypes. To our...

Data from: Partner choice creates fairness in humans

Stéphane Debove, Jean-Baptiste André, Nicolas Baumard & J.-B. Andre
Many studies demonstrate that partner choice has played an important role in the evolution of human cooperation, but little work has tested its impact on the evolution of human fairness. In experiments involving divisions of money, people become either over-generous or over-selfish when they are in competition to be chosen as cooperative partners. Hence, it is difficult to see how partner choice could result in the evolution of fair, equal divisions. Here, we show that...

Data from: Colonization of the Mediterranean Basin by the vector biting midge species Culicoides imicola: an old story

Stephanie Jacquet, Claire Garros, Eric Lombaert, Catherine Walton, Johana Restrepo, Xavier Allene, Thierry Baldet, Catherine Cetre-Sossah, Alexandra Chaskopoulou, Jean-Claude Delecolle, Amelie Desvars, Mouloud Djerbal, Moussa Fall, Laetitia Gardes, Michel De Garine-Wichatitsky, Maria Goffredo, Yuval Gottlieb, Assane Gueye Fall, Muo Kasina, Karien Labuschagne, Youssef Lhor, Javier Lucientes, Thibaud Martin, Bruno Mathieu, Miguel Miranda … & J.-C. Delecolle
Understanding the demographic history and genetic make-up of colonizing species is critical for inferring population sources and colonization routes. This is of main interest for designing accurate control measures in areas newly colonized by vector species of economically important pathogens. The biting midge Culicoides imicola is a major vector of orbiviruses to livestock. Historically, the distribution of this species was limited to the Afrotropical region. Entomological surveys first revealed the presence of C. imicola in...

Data from: Neutral and adaptive genomic signatures of rapid poleward range expansion

Janne Swaegers, Joachim Mergeay, Anneleen Van Geystelen, Lieven Therry, Maarten H.D. Larmuseau, Robby Stoks & M. H. D. Larmuseau
Many species are expanding their range polewards and this has been associated with rapid phenotypic change. Yet, it is unclear to what extent this reflects rapid genetic adaptation or neutral processes associated with range expansion, or selection linked to the new thermal conditions encountered. To disentangle these alternatives, we studied the genomic signature of range expansion in the damselfly Coenagrion scitulum using 4950 newly developed genomic SNPs and linked this to the rapidly evolved phenotypic...

Data from: Eurasian house mouse (Mus musculus L.) differentiation at microsatellite loci identifies the Iranian plateau as a phylogeographic hotspot

Emilie A. Hardouin, Annie Orth, Meike Teschke, Jamshid Darvish, Diethard Tautz & Francois Bonhomme
Background The phylogeography of the house mouse (Mus musculus L.), an emblematic species for genetic and biomedical studies, is only partly understood, essentially because of a sampling bias towards its most peripheral populations in Europe, Asia and the Americas. Moreover, the present-day phylogeographic hypotheses stem mostly from the study of mitochondrial lineages. In this article, we complement the mtDNA studies with a comprehensive survey of nuclear markers (19 microsatellite loci) typed in 963 individuals from...

Data from: Mercury exposure, stress and prolactin secretion in an Arctic seabird: an experimental study

Sabrina Tartu, Paco Bustamante, Frédéric Angelier, Ádám Z. Lendvai, Børge Moe, Pierre Blévin, Claus Bech, Geir W. Gabrielsen, Jan Ove Bustnes & Olivier Chastel
Life-history theory predicts that long-lived organisms should reduce parental effort under inclement environmental conditions in order to favour long-term survival. Seabirds are long-lived top predators often exposed to environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals such as mercury (Hg). Hg-contaminated birds show disrupted parental behaviour. Avian parental behaviour is governed by two key hormones in birds: corticosterone (CORT, a glucocorticoid hormone) and prolactin (PRL, a pituitary hormone involved in parental care). Any disruption of these hormones may alter...

Data from: Linkage of plant trait space to successional age and species richness in boreal forest understory vegetation

Bright B. Kumordzi, Francesco De Bello, Grégoire Freschet, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Jan Lepš & David A. Wardle
Determining the changes in within- and between-species functional diversity in plant communities, and their contribution to overall species trait overlap, can enhance efforts at understanding mechanisms of species coexistence. However, little is known about how variation in species functional diversity influences variation in species trait overlap among contrasting environments. Here, we studied the understorey vegetation in a well-characterized 5000-year-old chronosequence involving 30 forested islands that differ greatly in size, soil fertility, and species diversity. Across...

Data from: The oldest notostracan (Upper Devonian Strud locality, Belgium)

Linda Lagebro, Pierre Gueriau, Thomas A. Hegna, Nicolas Rabet, Aodhán D. Butler & Graham E. Budd
A new notostracan crustacean, Strudops goldenbergi gen. et sp. nov., is described from the well-preserved terrestrial arthropod fauna of the Upper Devonian of Strud, Belgium. The fossil notostracan bears a close resemblance to modern notostracans in possessing a large, simple head shield covering almost half of the whole body, a set of phyllopodous thoracic appendages and a legless posterior abdomen with a telson bearing a caudal furca. The differentiation and relative size of mouthparts and...

Data from: Characterization of the placoderm (Gnathostomata) assemblage from the tetrapod-bearing locality of Strud (Belgium, Upper Famennian)

Sébastien Olive, Gaël Clément, Edward B. Daeschler & Vincent Dupret
The placoderm fauna of the late Famennian tetrapod-bearing locality of Strud, Belgium, is studied on the basis of historical and newly collected material. It includes the previously described antiarch Grossilepis rikiki, the groenlandaspidid Turrisaspis strudensis sp. nov. and the actinolepidoideid Phyllolepis undulata. P. undulata is thoroughly described and joins the list of the valid Phyllolepis species confidently diagnosed. A morphometrical analysis performed on the centronuchal and anterior ventrolateral plates of the Phyllolepis material demonstrates that...

Data from: Host nutritional status mediates degree of parasitoid virulence

Fanny Maure, Frédéric Thomas, Josée Doyon & Jacques Brodeur
Parasitic organisms rely on the resources of their hosts to obtain nutrients essential for growth and reproduction. Insect parasitoids constitute an extreme condition since they develop in a single host from which they typically consume all available resources. As a result, the host is killed following parasitism. However, a few intriguing cases of host survival have been reported wherein hosts resume foraging and may even reproduce following parasitoid emergence. Yet, the ultimate and proximate mechanisms...

Data from: Climate interacts with anthropogenic drivers to determine extirpation dynamics

Lise Comte, Bernard Hugueny & Gaël Grenouillet
Theoretical studies suggest that the dynamics of a species’ range during a period of climate change depends upon the existence and interplay of various ecological and evolutionary processes. Here we tested how anthropogenic pressures contribute to climate-mediated extirpation patterns of 32 freshwater fish species over the last 20 yr. We contrasted two extreme cases to determine whether extirpations were governed by patterns of climate exposure, assuming full adaptation of species to local climate, or instead...

Data from: Manipulation of the N-terminal sequence of the Borna disease virus X protein improves its mitochondrial targeting and neuroprotective potential

Cécile A. Ferré, Noélie Davezac, Anne Thouard, Jean-Michel Peyrin, Pascale Belenguer, Marie-Christine Miquel, Daniel Gonzalez-Dunia & Marion Szelechowski
To favor their replication, viruses express proteins that target diverse mammalian cellular pathways. Due to the limited size of many viral genomes, such proteins are endowed with multiple functions, which require targeting to different subcellular compartments. One salient example is the X protein of Borna disease virus, which is expressed both at the mitochondria and in the nucleus. Moreover, we recently demonstrated that mitochondrial X protein is neuroprotective. In this study, we sought to examine...

Data from: Genetic isolation between two recently diverged populations of a symbiotic fungus

Sara Branco, Pierre Gladieux, Christopher E. Ellison, Alan Kuo, Kurt LaButii, Anna Lipzen, Igor V. Grigoriev, Hui-Ling Liao, Rytas Vilgalys, Kabir G. Peay, John W. Taylor, Thomas D. Bruns & Kurt LaButti
Fungi are an omnipresent and highly diverse group of organisms, making up a significant part of eukaryotic diversity. Little is currently known about the drivers of fungal population differentiation and subsequent divergence of species, particularly in symbiotic, mycorrhizal fungi. Here, we investigate the population structure and environmental adaptation in Suillus brevipes (Peck) Kuntze, a wind-dispersed soil fungus that is symbiotic with pine trees. We assembled and annotated the reference genome for Su. brevipes and resequenced...

Data from: Automixis in Artemia: solving a century-old controversy

Odrade Nougué, Nicolas O. Rode, Roula Zahab, Adeline Ségard, Luis-Miguel Chevin, Christoph R. Haag, Thomas Lenormand & R. Jabbour-Zahab
Parthenogenesis (reproduction through unfertilized eggs) encompasses a variety of reproduction modes with (automixis) or without (apomixis) meiosis. Different modes of automixis have very different genetic and evolutionary consequences but can be particularly difficult to tease apart. In this paper, we propose a new method to discriminate different types of automixis from population-level genetic data. We apply this method to diploid Artemia parthenogenetica, a crustacean whose reproductive mode remains controversial despite a century of intensive cytogenetic...

Data from: Transgenerational effect of infection in Plasmodium-infected mosquitoes

Romain Pigeault, Julien Vézilier, Antoine Nicot, Sylvain Gandon, Ana Rivero & J. Vezilier
Transgenerational effects of infection have a huge potential to influence the prevalence and intensity of infections in vectors and, by extension, disease epidemiology. These transgenerational effects may increase the fitness of offspring through the transfer of protective immune factors. Alternatively, however, infected mothers may transfer the costs of infection to their offspring. Although transgenerational immune protection has been described in a dozen invertebrate species, we still lack a complete picture of the incidence and importance...

Data from: Estimating the variation, autocorrelation, and environmental sensitivity of phenotypic selection

Luis-Miguel Chevin, Marcel E. Visser & Jarle Tufto
Despite considerable interest in temporal and spatial variation of phenotypic selection, very few methods allow quantifying this variation while correctly accounting for the error variance of each individual estimate. Furthermore, the available methods do not estimate the autocorrelation of phenotypic selection, which is a major determinant of eco-evolutionary dynamics in changing environments. We introduce a new method for measuring variable phenotypic selection using random regression. We rely on model selection to assess the support for...

Data from: Hybridization in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup: incomplete isolation among the three species of the yakuba complex

David A. Turissini, Geoffrey Liu, Jean R. David & Daniel R. Matute
In the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup, the yakuba species complex, D. yakuba, D. santomea and D. teissieri have identical mitochondrial genomes in spite of nuclear differentiation. The first two species can be readily hybridized in the laboratory, and produce fertile females and sterile males. They also form hybrids in natural conditions. Nonetheless, the third species, D. teissieri, was thought to be unable to produce hybrids with either D. yakuba or D. santomea. This in turn posed...

Data from: A quantitative framework for investigating risk of deadly collisions between marine wildlife and boats

Julien Martin, Quentin Sabatier, Timothy A. Gowan, Christophe Giraud, Eliezer Gurarie, Charles Scott Calleson, Joel G. Ortega-Ortiz, Charles J. Deutsch, Athena Rycyk & Stacie M. Koslovsky
Speed regulations of watercraft in protected areas are designed to reduce lethal collisions with wildlife but can have economic consequences. We present a quantitative framework for investigating the risk of deadly collisions between boats and wildlife. We apply encounter rate theory to demonstrate how marine mammal-boat encounter rate can be used to predict the expected number of deaths associated with management scenarios. We illustrate our approach with management scenarios for two endangered species: the Florida...

Data from: Low genetic diversity despite multiple introductions of the invasive plant species Impatiens glandulifera in Europe

Jenny Hagenblad, Jennifer Hülskötter, Kamal Prasad Acharya, Jörg Brunet, Olivier Chabrerie, Sara A. O. Cousins, Pervaiz A. Dar, Martin Diekmann, Pieter De Frenne, Martin Hermy, Aurélien Jamoneau, Annette Kolb, Isgard Lemke, Jan Plue, Zafar A. Reshi & Bente Jessen Graae
Background: Invasive species can be a major threat to native biodiversity and the number of invasive plant species is increasing across the globe. Population genetic studies of invasive species can provide key insights into their invasion history and ensuing evolution, but also for their control. Here we genetically characterise populations of Impatiens glandulifera, an invasive plant in Europe that can have a major impact on native plant communities. We compared populations from the species’ native...

Data from: A longitudinal study of age-related changes in Haemoproteus infection in a passerine bird

Alfonso Marzal, Javier Balbontín, Maribel Reviriego, Luz García-Longoria, Carmen Relinque, Ignacio G Hermosell, Sergio Magallanes, Cosme López-Calderón, Florentino De Lope & Anders Pape Moller
Blood parasites such as malaria and related haemosporidians commonly infect vertebrate species including birds. Understanding age-specific patterns of parasite infections is crucial for quantifying the fitness consequences of parasitism for hosts and for understanding parasite transmission dynamics. We analyzed longitudinal and cross-sectional infection data in house martins Delichon urbica, a migratory bird suffering from intense haemosporidian infection. We separated within- from among-individual effects of age on prevalence. Our results showed that the probability of blood...

Data from: Phylogeny of seven Bulinus species originating from endemic areas in three African countries, in relation to the human blood fluke Schistosoma haematobium

Rima Zein-Eddine, Félicité Flore Djuikwo-Teukeng, Mustafa Al-Jawhari, Bruno Senghor, Tine Huyse & Gilles Dreyfuss
Background: Snails species belonging to the genus Bulinus (Planorbidae) serve as intermediate host for flukes belonging to the genus Schistosoma (Digenea, Platyhelminthes). Despite its importance in the transmission of these parasites, the evolutionary history of this genus is still obscure. In the present study, we used the partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene, and the nuclear ribosomal ITS, 18S and 28S genes to investigate the haplotype diversity and phylogeny of seven Bulinus species...

Data from: Rival assessment among northern elephant seals: evidence of associative learning during male-male contests

Caroline Casey, Isabelle Charrier, Nicolas Mathevon & Colleen Reichmuth
Specialized signals emitted by competing males often convey honest information about fighting ability. It is generally believed that receivers use these signals to directly assess their opponents. Here, we demonstrate an alternative communication strategy used by males in a breeding system where the costs of conflict are extreme. We evaluated the acoustic displays of breeding male northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), and found that social knowledge gained through prior experience with signallers was sufficient to...

Data from: Ecologically diverse and distinct neighbourhoods trigger persistent phenotypic consequences, and amine metabolic profiling detects them

Françoise Hennion, Isabelle Litrico, Igor Bartish, Alexandra Weigelt, Alain Bouchereau & Andreas Prinzing
1.Global change triggers rapid alterations in the composition and diversity of plant communities which may change ecosystem functioning. Do changes in community diversity also change traits persistently, i.e. does coexistence with numerous or functionally or phylogenetically distinct species trigger, in a given focal species, trait shifts that persist? 2.We studied the grass Dactylis glomerata. Dactylis was grown in experimental plots with different species compositions for five years, sampled, cloned and grown in a common garden....

Registration Year

  • 2015
    120

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    120

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    120
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    16
  • University of Toulouse
    6
  • University of Montpellier
    5
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    4
  • University of Cambridge
    4
  • Uppsala University
    4
  • Ghent University
    3
  • Stanford University
    3
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    3