126 Works

Data from: Size evolution in microorganisms masks trade-offs predicted by the growth rate hypothesis

Isabelle Gounand, Tanguy Daufresne, Dominique Gravel, Corinne Bouvier, Thierry Bouvier, Marine Combe, Claire Gougat-Barbera, Franck Poly, Clara Torres-Barceló & Nicolas Mouquet
Adaptation to local resource availability depends on responses in growth rate and nutrient acquisition. The growth rate hypothesis (GRH) suggests that growing fast should impair competitive abilities for phosphorus and nitrogen due to high demand for biosynthesis. However, in microorganisms, size influences both growth and uptake rates, which may mask trade-offs and instead generate a positive relationship between these traits (size hypothesis, SH). Here, we evolved a gradient of maximum growth rate (μmax) from a...

Data from: Carbon recovery dynamics following disturbance by selective logging in Amazonian forests

Camille Piponiot, Plinio Sist, Lucas Mazzei, Marielos Peña-Claros, Francis E. Putz, Ervan Rutishauser, Alexander Shenkin, Nataly Ascarrunz, Celso P. De Azevedo, Christopher Baraloto, Mabiane França, Marcelino Guedes, Eurídice N. Honorio Coronado, Marcus V. N. D'Oliveira, Ademir R. Ruschel, Katia E. Da Silva, Eleneide Doff Sotta, Cintia R. De Souza, Edson Vidal, Thales A. P. West, Bruno Hérault & Thales AP West
When 2 Mha of Amazonian forests are disturbed by selective logging each year, more than 90 Tg of carbon (C) is emitted to the atmosphere. Emissions are then counterbalanced by forest regrowth. With an original modelling approach, calibrated on a network of 133 permanent forest plots (175 ha total) across Amazonia, we link regional differences in climate, soil and initial biomass with survivors' and recruits' C fluxes to provide Amazon-wide predictions of post-logging C recovery....

Data from: Local adaptation drives thermal tolerance among parasite populations: a common garden experiment

Elise Mazé-Guilmo, Simon Blanchet, Olivier Rey, Nicolas Canto & Géraldine Loot
Understanding the evolutionary responses of organisms to thermal regimes is of prime importance to better predict their ability to cope with ongoing climate change. Although this question has attracted interest in free-living organisms, whether or not infectious diseases have evolved heterogeneous responses to climate is still an open question. Here, we ran a common garden experiment using the fish ectoparasite Tracheliastes polycolpus, (i) to test whether parasites living in thermally heterogeneous rivers respond differently to...

Data from: Habitat specialization predicts genetic response to fragmentation in tropical birds

Aurélie Khimoun, Cyril Eraud, Anthony Ollivier, Emilie Arnoux, Vincent Rocheteau, Marine Bely, Emilie Lefol, Martin Delpuech, Marie-Laure Carpentier, Gilles Leblond, Anthony Levesque, Anais Charbonnel, Bruno Faivre & Stéphane Garnier
Habitat fragmentation is one of the most severe threats to biodiversity as it may lead to changes in population genetic structure, with ultimate modifications of species evolutionary potential and local extinctions. Nonetheless, fragmentation does not equally affect all species and identifying which ecological traits are related to species sensitivity to habitat fragmentation could help prioritization of conservation efforts. Despite the theoretical link between species ecology and extinction proneness, comparative studies explicitly testing the hypothesis that...

Data from: Learning and robustness to catch-and-release fishing in a shark social network

Johann Mourier, Culum Brown & Serge Planes
Individuals can play different roles in maintaining connectivity and social cohesion in animal populations and thereby influence population robustness to perturbations. We performed a social network analysis in a reef shark population to assess the vulnerability of the global network to node removal under different scenarios. We found that the network was generally robust to the removal of nodes with high centrality. The network appeared also highly robust to experimental fishing. Individual shark catchability decreased...

Data from: Cooperation-mediated plasticity in dispersal and colonization

Staffan Jacob, Priscilla Wehi, Jean Clobert, Delphine Legrand, Nicolas Schtickzelle, Michele Huet & Alexis Chaine
Kin selection theory predicts that costly cooperative behaviors evolve most readily when directed toward kin. Dispersal plays a controversial role in the evolution of cooperation: dispersal decreases local population relatedness and thus opposes the evolution of cooperation, but limited dispersal increases kin competition and can negate the benefits of cooperation. Theoretical work has suggested that plasticity of dispersal, where individuals can adjust their dispersal decisions according to the social context, might help resolve this paradox...

Data from: Habituation in non-neural organisms: evidence from slime moulds

Romain P. Boisseau, David Vogel & Audrey Dussutour
Learning, defined as a change in behaviour evoked by experience, has hitherto been investigated almost exclusively in multicellular neural organisms. Evidence for learning in non-neural multicellular organisms is scant and only a few unequivocal reports of learning have been described in single celled organisms. Here we demonstrate habituation, an unmistakable form of learning, in the non-neural organism Physarum polycephalum. In our experiment, using chemotaxis as the behavioural output and quinine or caffeine as the stimulus,...

Data from: MycoDB, a global database of plant response to mycorrhizal fungi

V. Bala Chaudhary, Megan A. Rúa, Anita Antoninka, James D. Bever, Jeffery Cannon, Ashley Craig, Jessica Duchicela, Alicia Frame, Monique Gardes, Catherine Gehring, Michelle Ha, Miranda Hart, Jacob Hopkins, Baoming Ji, Nancy Collins Johnson, Wittaya Kaonongbua, Justine Karst, Roger T. Koide, Louis J. Lamit, James Meadow, Brook G. Milligan, John C. Moore, , Bridget Piculell, Blake Ramsby … & Jason D. Hoeksema
Plants form belowground associations with mycorrhizal fungi in one of the most common symbioses on Earth. However, few large-scale generalizations exist for the structure and function of mycorrhizal symbioses, as the nature of this relationship varies from mutualistic to parasitic and is largely context-dependent. We announce the public release of MycoDB, a database of 4,010 studies (from 438 unique publications) to aid in multi-factor meta-analyses elucidating the ecological and evolutionary context in which mycorrhizal fungi...

Data from: Is there any evidence for rapid, genetically-based, climatic niche expansion in the invasive common ragweed?

Laure Gallien, Wilfried Thuiller, Noémie Fort, Marti Boleda, Florian J. Alberto, Delphine Rioux, Juliette Lainé & Sébastien Lavergne
Climatic niche shifts have been documented in a number of invasive species by comparing the native and adventive climatic ranges in which they occur. However, these shifts likely represent changes in the realized climatic niches of invasive species, and may not necessarily be driven by genetic changes in climatic affinities. Until now the role of rapid niche evolution in the spread of invasive species remains a challenging issue with conflicting results. Here, we document a...

Data from: Detecting genomic signatures of natural selection with principal component analysis: application to the 1000 Genomes data

Nicolas Duforet-Frebourg, Guillaume Laval, Eric Bazin, Michael G.B. Blum & Keurcien Luu
To characterize natural selection, various analytical methods for detecting candidate genomic regions have been developed. We propose to perform genome-wide scans of natural selection using principal component analysis (PCA). We show that the common FST index of genetic differentiation between populations can be viewed as the proportion of variance explained by the principal components. Considering the correlations between genetic variants and each principal component provides a conceptual framework to detect genetic variants involved in local...

Data from: Multiple paternity in a wild population of Armadillidium vulgare: influence of infection with Wolbachia?

Victorien Valette, Sylvine Durand, Nicolas Bech, Frédéric Grandjean & Sophie Beltron-Bech
Female multiple mating has been extensively studied to understand how non-obvious benefits, generally thought to be of genetic nature, could overcome heavy costs such as an increased risk of infection during mating. However, the impact of infection itself on multiple mating has rarely been addressed. The interaction between the bacterium Wolbachia and its terrestrial crustacean host, Armadillidium vulgare, is a relevant model to investigate this question. In this association, Wolbachia is able to turn genetic...

Data from: The carry-over effects of pollen shortage decrease the survival of honeybee colonies in farmlands

Fabrice Requier, Jean-Francois Odoux, Mickaël Henry & Vincent Bretagnolle
Many studies have reported honeybee colony losses in human-dominated landscapes. While bee floral food resources have been drastically reduced over past decades in human-dominated landscapes, no field study has yet been undertaken to determine whether there is a carry-over effect between seasonal disruption in floral resource availability and high colony losses. We investigated if a decline in the harvest of pollen by honeybees in spring affected managed honeybee colony dynamics (brood size, adult population and...

Data from: Novel energy-saving strategies to multiple stressors in birds: the ultradian regulation of body temperature

Glenn J. Tattersall, Damien Roussel, Yann Voituron & Loïc Teulier
This study aimed to examine thermoregulatory responses in birds facing two commonly experienced stressors, cold and fasting. Logging devices allowing long-term and precise access to internal body temperature were placed within the gizzards of ducklings acclimated to cold (CA) (5°C) or thermoneutrality (TN) (25°C). The animals were then examined under three equal 4-day periods: ad libitum feeding, fasting and re-feeding. Through the analysis of daily as well as short-term, or ultradian, variations of body temperature,...

Data from: Long-term dynamics in microbial eukaryotes communities: a paleolimnological view based on sedimentary DNA

Eric Capo, Didier Debroas, Fabien Arnaud, Typhaine Guillemot, Vincent Bichet, Laurent Millet, Emilie Gauthier, Charly Massa, Anne-Lise Develle, Cecile Pignol, Franck Lejzerowicz & Isabelle Domaizon
Assessing the extent to which changes in lacustrine biodiversity are affected by anthropogenic or climatic forces requires extensive palaeolimnological data. We used high-throughput sequencing to generate time-series data encompassing over 2200 years of microbial eukaryotes (protists and Fungi) diversity changes from the sedimentary DNA record of two lakes (Lake Bourget in French Alps and Lake Igaliku in Greenland). From 176 samples, we sequenced a large diversity of microbial eukaryotes, with a total 16 386 operational...

Data from: A combined field survey and molecular identification protocol for comparing forest arthropod biodiversity across spatial scales

Brent C. Emerson, Juliane Casquet, Heriberto López, Pedro Cardoso, Paulo A. V. Borges, Noémy Mollaret, Pedro Oromí, Dominique Strasberg & Christophe Thébaud
Obtaining fundamental biodiversity metrics such as alpha, beta and gamma diversity for arthropods is often complicated by a lack of prior taxonomic information and/or taxonomic expertise, which can result in unreliable morphologically based estimates. We provide a set of standardized ecological and molecular sampling protocols that can be employed by researchers whose taxonomic skills may be limited, and where there may be a lack of robust a priori information regarding the regional pool of species....

Data from: Evolution of a butterfly dispersal syndrome

Delphine Legrand, Nicolas Larranaga, Romain Bertrand, Simon Ducatez, Olivier Calvez, Virginie M. Stevens & Michel Baguette
The existence of dispersal syndromes contrasting disperser from resident phenotypes within populations has been intensively documented across taxa. However, how such suites of phenotypic traits emerge and are maintained is largely unknown, although deciphering the processes shaping the evolution of dispersal phenotypes is a key in ecology and evolution. In this study, we created artificial populations of a butterfly, in which we controlled for individual phenotypes and measured experimentally the roles of selection and genetic...

Data from: Incomplete lineage sorting in mammalian phylogenomics

Celine Scornavacca & Nicolas Galtier
The impact of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) on phylogenetic conflicts among genes, and the related issue of whether to account for ILS in species tree reconstruction, are matters of intense controversy. Here, focusing on full-genome data in placental mammals, we empirically test two assumptions underlying current usage of tree-building methods that account for ILS. We show that in this dataset (i) distinct exons from a common gene do not share a common genealogy, and (ii)...

Data from: Initiation of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection in the absence of physical contact with infected hosts – a field study in a high altitude lake

Elodie A. Courtois, Adeline Loyau, Mégane Bourgoin & Dirk S. Schmeller
Understanding transmission is a critical prerequisite for predicting disease dynamics and impacts on host populations. It is well established that Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the amphibian fungal pathogen responsible for chytridiomycosis, can be transmitted directly, through physical contact with an infected host. However, indirect pathways of transmission remain poorly investigated. We conducted a five-week long field infection experiment at a high altitude mountain lake in the French Pyrenees to investigate Bd transmission pathways in larval midwife...

Data from: The first iguanian lizard from the Mesozoic of Africa

Sebastian Apesteguía, Juan D. Daza, Tiago R. Rodrigues Simões & Jean Claude Rage
The fossil record shows that iguanian lizards were widely distributed during the Late Cretaceous. However, the biogeographic history and early evolution of one of its most diverse and peculiar clades (acrodontans) remain poorly known. Here, we present the first Mesozoic acrodontan from Africa, which also represents the oldest iguanian lizard from that continent. The new taxon comes from the Kem Kem Beds in Morocco (Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous) and is based on a partial lower jaw....

Data from: Using a forest dynamics model to link community assembly processes and traits structure

Mickaël Chauvet, Georges Kunstler, Jacques Roy & Xavier Morin
1. Trait-based approaches have been increasingly used to understand the role of environmental and biotic filters on species assembly. However, our understanding of the relationships between traits and community assembly processes remain limited. Indeed, various assembly processes may lead to similar functional patterns, and the effects of a given process may vary with the considered traits. Especially, competition can result in trait divergence or convergence depending on whether the trait is related to niche differences...

Data from: A new integrative framework for large-scale assessments of biodiversity and community dynamics, using littoral gastropods and crabs of British Columbia, Canada

Magalie Castelin, Niels Van Steenkiste, Eric Pante, Rick Harbo, Geoff Lowe, Scott R. Gilmore, Thomas W. Therriault & Cathryn L. Abbott
Improving our understanding of species responses to environmental changes is an important contribution ecologists can make to facilitate effective management decisions. Novel synthetic approaches to assessing biodiversity and ecosystem integrity are needed, ideally including all species living in a community and the dynamics defining their ecological relationships. Here we present and apply an integrative approach that links high-throughput, multi-character taxonomy with community ecology. The overall purpose is to enable the coupling of biodiversity assessments with...

Data from: The evolutionary origins of hierarchy

Henok Mengistu, Joost Huizinga, Jean-Baptiste Mouret & Jeff Clune
Hierarchical organization—the recursive composition of sub-modules—is ubiquitous in biological networks, including neural, metabolic, ecological, and genetic regulatory networks, and in human-made systems, such as large organizations and the Internet. To date, most research on hierarchy in networks has been limited to quantifying this property. However, an open, important question in evolutionary biology is why hierarchical organization evolves in the first place. It has recently been shown that modularity evolves because of the presence of a...

Data from: Introduced Drosophila subobscura populations perform better than native populations during an oviposition choice task due to increased fecundity but similar learning ability

Julien Foucaud, Céline Moreno, Marta Pascual, Enrico L. Rezende, Luis E. Castañeda, Patricia Gibert & Frederic Mery
The success of invasive species is tightly linked to their fitness in a putatively novel environment. While quantitative components of fitness have been studied extensively in the context of invasive species, fewer studies have looked at qualitative components of fitness, such as behavioral plasticity, and their interaction with quantitative components, despite intuitive benefits over the course of an invasion. In particular, learning is a form of behavioral plasticity that makes it possible to finely tune...

Data from: Palenque de San Basilio in Colombia: genetic data supports an oral history of a paternal ancestry in Congo

Naser Ansari-Pour, Yves Moñino, Constanza Duque, Natalia Gallego, Gabriel Bedoya, Mark G. Thomas & Neil Bradman
The Palenque, a black community in rural Colombia, have an oral history of fugitive African slaves founding a free village near Cartagena in the seventeenth century. Recently, linguists have identified some 200 words in regular use that originate in a Kikongo language, with Yombe, mainly spoken in the Congo region, being the most likely source. The non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) and mitochondrial DNA were analysed to establish whether there was greater similarity...

Data from: Adaptation services of floodplains and wetlands under transformational climate change

Matthew J. Colloff, Sandra Lavorel, Russell M. Wise, Michael Dunlop, Ian C. Overton & Kristen J. Williams
Adaptation services are the ecosystem processes and services that benefit people by increasing their ability to adapt to change. Benefits may accrue from existing but newly-used services where ecosystems persist, or from novel services supplied following ecosystem transformation. Ecosystem properties that enable persistence or transformation are important adaptation services because they support future options. The adaptation services approach can be applied to decisions on trade-offs between currently valued services and benefits from maintaining future options....

Registration Year

  • 2016
    126

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    126

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    126
  • University of Montpellier
    9
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    8
  • Sorbonne University
    6
  • University of Toulouse
    5
  • University of Lyon System
    5
  • University of Aberdeen
    4
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    3
  • Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
    3
  • Paul Sabatier University
    3