126 Works

Data from: Competitors and predators alter settlement patterns and reproductive success of an intraguild prey

Chiara Morosinotto, Alexandre Villers, Robert L. Thomson, Rauno Varjonen & Erkki Korpimäki
The spatial distribution of predators is affected by intra- and interspecific interactions within the predator guild. Studying these interactions under fluctuating food availability, while taking habitat characteristics into account, offers a quasi-experimental set up to determine the relative impact of con- and heterospecifics on reproductive success of predators. We analyzed the settlement decisions and reproductive success of Eurasian pygmy owls (Glaucidium passerinum) in the presence of both breeding conspecifics and their competitor and intraguild predator,...

Data from: Family-assisted inference of the genetic architecture of MHC variation

Arnaud Gaigher, Reto Burri, Walid H. Gharib, Pierre Taberlet, Alexandre Roulin & Luca Fumagalli
With their direct link to individual fitness, genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are a popular system to study the evolution of adaptive genetic diversity. However, owing to the highly dynamic evolution of the MHC region, the isolation, characterization and genotyping of MHC genes remain a major challenge. While high-throughput sequencing technologies now provide unprecedented resolution of the high allelic diversity observed at the MHC, in many species, it remains unclear (i) how alleles...

Data from: Responses of King penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) adults and chicks to two food-related odours

Gregory B. Cunningham, Sarah Leclaire, Camille Toscani & Francesco Bonadonna
Increasing evidence suggests that penguins are sensitive to dimethyl sulphide (DMS), a scented airborne compound that a variety of marine animals use to find productive areas of the ocean where prey is likely to be found. Here we present data showing that king penguins Aptenodytes patagonicus are also sensitive to DMS. We deployed DMS on a lake near a king penguin colony at Ratmanoff beach in the Kerguelen archipelago. We also presented DMS to ‘sleeping’...

Data from: Extreme climate events counteract the effects of climate and land-use changes in Alpine treelines

Ceres Barros, Maya Guéguen, Rolland Douzet, Marta Carboni, Isabelle Boulangeat, Niklaus E. Zimmermann, Tamara Münkemüller & Wilfried Thuiller
Climate change and extreme events, such as drought, threaten ecosystems world-wide and in particular mountain ecosystems, where species often live at their environmental tolerance limits. In the European Alps, plant communities are also influenced by land-use abandonment leading to woody encroachment of subalpine and alpine grasslands. In this study, we explored how the forest–grassland ecotone of Alpine tree lines will respond to gradual climate warming, drought events and land-use change in terms of forest expansion...

Data from: Mating success and body condition not related to foraging specializations in male fur seals

Laëtitia Kernaléguen, Yves Cherel, Christophe Guinet & John Arnould
Individual specialization is widespread among wild populations. While its fitness consequences are central in predicting the ecological and evolutionary trajectories of populations, they remain poorly understood. Long-term individual foraging specializations occur in male Antarctic (Arctocephalus gazella) and Australian (A. pusillus doriferus) fur seals. Strong selective pressure is expected in these highly dimorphic and polygynous species, raising the question of the fitness payoffs associated with different foraging strategies. We investigated the relationship between individual isotopic niche...

Data from: Temporal sampling helps unravel the genetic structure of naturally occurring populations of a phytoparasitic nematode. 2. Separating the relative effects of gene flow and genetic drift

Cécile Gracianne, Pierre-Loup Jan, Sylvain Fournet, Eric Olivier, Jean-François Arnaud, Catherine Porte, Sylvie Bardou-Valette, Marie-Christine Denis, Eric Petit & Eric J. Petit
Studying wild pathogen populations in natural ecosystems offers the opportunity to better understand the evolutionary dynamics of biotic diseases in crops and to enhance pest control strategies. We used simulations and genetic markers to investigate the spatial and temporal population genetic structure of wild populations of the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii on a wild host plant species, the sea beet (Beta vulgaris spp. maritima), the wild ancestor of cultivated beets. Our analysis of the...

Data from: Stock enhancement or sea ranching? Insights from monitoring the genetic diversity, relatedness and effective size in a seeded great scallop population (Pecten maximus)

Romain Morvezen, Pierre Boudry, Jean Laroche & Grégory Charrier
The mass release of hatchery-propagated stocks raises numerous questions concerning its efficiency in terms of local recruitment and effect on the genetic diversity of wild populations. A seeding program, consisting of mass release of hatchery-produced juveniles in the local naturally occurring population of great scallops (Pecten maximus L.), was initiated in the early 1980s in the Bay of Brest (France). The present study aims at evaluating whether this seeding program leads to actual population enhancement,...

Data from: Selective disappearance of individuals with high levels of glycated haemoglobin in a free-living bird

Charlotte Récapet, Adélaïde Sibeaux, Laure Cauchard, Blandine Doligez & Pierre Bize
Although disruption of glucose homeostasis is a hallmark of ageing in humans and laboratory model organisms, we have little information on the importance of this process in free-living animals. Poor control of blood glucose levels leads to irreversible protein glycation. Hence, levels of protein glycation are hypothesized to increase with age and to be associated with a decline in survival. We tested these predictions by measuring blood glycated haemoglobin in 274 adult collared flycatchers of...

Data from: Tempo and mode of genome evolution in a 50,000-generation experiment

Olivier Tenaillon, Jeffrey E. Barrick, Noah Ribeck, Daniel E. Deatherage, Jeffrey L. Blanchard, Aurko Dasgupta, Gabriel C. Wu, Sébastien Wielgoss, Stéphane Cruveiller, Claudine Médigue, Dominique Schneider & Richard E. Lenski
Adaptation by natural selection depends on the rates, effects and interactions of many mutations, making it difficult to determine what proportion of mutations in an evolving lineage are beneficial. Here we analysed 264 complete genomes from 12 Escherichia coli populations to characterize their dynamics over 50,000 generations. The populations that retained the ancestral mutation rate support a model in which most fixed mutations are beneficial, the fraction of beneficial mutations declines as fitness rises, and...

Data from: Migratory connectivity and effects of winter temperatures on migratory behaviour of the European robin Erithacus rubecula: a continent-wide analysis

Roberto Ambrosini, José Cuervo, Chris Du Feu, Wolfgang Fiedler, Musitelli Federica, Diego Rubolini, Beatrice Sicurella, Fernando Spina, Nicola Saino, Anders Møller & Federica Musitelli
1. Many partially migratory species show phenotypically divergent populations in terms of migratory behaviour, with climate hypothesized to be a major driver of such variability through its differential effects on sedentary and migratory individuals. 2. Based on long-term (1947–2011) bird ringing data, we analysed phenotypic differentiation of migratory behaviour among populations of the European robin Erithacus rubecula across Europe. 3. We showed that clusters of populations sharing breeding and wintering ranges varied from partial (British...

Data from: Paternal but not maternal age influences early-life performance of offspring in a long-lived seabird

Rémi Fay, Christophe Barbraud, Karine Delord & Henri Weimerskirch
Variability in demographic traits between individuals within populations has profound implications for both evolutionary processes and population dynamics. Parental effects as a source of non-genetic inheritance are important processes to consider to understand the causes of individual variation. In iteroparous species, parental age is known to influence strongly reproductive success and offspring quality, but consequences on offspring fitness component after independence are much less studied. Based on a 37 years longitudinal monitoring of a long-lived...

Data from: The determinants of tropical forest deciduousness: disentangling the effects of rainfall and geology in central Africa

Dakis-Yaoba Ouédraogo, Adeline Fayolle, Sylvie Gourlet-Fleury, Frédéric Mortier, Vincent Freycon, Nicolas Fauvet, Suzanne Rabaud, Guillaume Cornu, Fabrice Bénédet, Jean-François Gillet, Richard Oslisly, Jean-Louis Doucet, Philippe Lejeune & Charly Favier
Understanding the environmental determinants of forests deciduousness i.e. proportion of deciduous trees in a forest stand, is of great importance when predicting the impact of ongoing global climate change on forests. In this study, we examine (i) how forest deciduousness varies in relation to rainfall and geology, and (ii) whether the influence of geology on deciduousness could be related to differences in soil fertility and water content between geological substrates. The study was conducted in...

Data from: Combining familiarity and landscape features helps break down the barriers between movements and home ranges in a non-territorial large herbivore

Pascal Marchand, Mathieu Garel, Gilles Bourgoin, Antoine Duparc, Dominique Dubray, Daniel Maillard & Anne Loison
Recent advances in animal ecology have enabled identification of certain mechanisms that lead to the emergence of territories and home ranges from movements considered as unbounded. Among them, memory and familiarity have been identified as key parameters in cognitive maps driving animal navigation, but have been only recently used in empirical analyses of animal movements. At the same time, the influence of landscape features on movements of numerous species and on space division in territorial...

Data from: Comparative tests of the role of dewlap size in Anolis lizard speciation

Travis Ingram, Alexis Harrison, D. Luke Mahler, María Del Rosario Castañeda, Richard E. Glor, Anthony Herrel, Yoel E. Stuart & Jonathan B. Losos
Phenotypic traits may be linked to speciation in two distinct ways: character values may influence the rate of speciation or diversification in the trait may be associated with speciation events. Traits involved in signal transmission, such as the dewlap of Anolis lizards, are often involved in the speciation process. The dewlap is an important visual signal with roles in species recognition and sexual selection, and dewlaps vary among species in relative size as well as...

Data from: Influence of environmental parameters on movements and habitat utilization of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in the Madagascar breeding ground

Laurène Trudelle, Salvatore Cerchio, Alexandre N. Zerbini, Ygor Geyer, Francois-Xavier Mayer, Jean-Luc Jung, Maxime R. Hervé, Stéphane Pous, Jean-Baptiste Sallée, Howard C. Rosenbaum, Olivier Adam & Jean-Benoit Charrassin
Assessing the movement patterns and key habitat features of breeding humpback whales is a prerequisite for the conservation management of this philopatric species. To investigate the interactions between humpback whale movements and environmental conditions off Madagascar, we deployed 25 satellite tags in the northeast and southwest coast of Madagascar. For each recorded position, we collated estimates of environmental variables and computed two behavioural metrics: behavioural state of ‘transiting’ (consistent/directional) versus ‘localized’ (variable/non-directional), and active swimming...

Data from: Anthropogenic ecosystem disturbance and the recovery debt

David Moreno Mateos, Edward B. Barbier, Peter C. Jones, Holly P. Jones, James Aronson, Jose A. Lopez-Lopez, Michelle L. McCrackin, Paula Meli, Daniel Montoya & José Rey Benayas
Ecosystem recovery from anthropogenic disturbances, either without human intervention or assisted by ecological restoration, is increasingly occurring worldwide. As ecosystems progress through recovery, it is important to estimate any resulting deficit in biodiversity and functions. Here we use data from 3,035 sampling plots worldwide, to quantify the interim reduction of biodiversity and functions occurring during the recovery process (that is, the ‘recovery debt’). Compared with reference levels, recovering ecosystems run annual deficits of 46–51% for...

Data from: Body reserves mediate trade-offs between life history traits: new insights from small pelagic fish reproduction

Pablo Brosset, Josep Lloret, Marta Muñoz, Christian Fauvel, Elisabeth Van Beveren, Virginie Marques, Jean-Marc Fromentin, Frédéric Ménard & Claire Saraux
Limited resources in the environment prevent individuals from simultaneously maximizing all life-history traits, resulting in trade-offs. In particular, the cost of reproduction is well known to negatively affect energy investment in growth and maintenance. Here, we investigated these trade-offs during contrasting periods of high versus low fish size and body condition (before/after 2008) in the Gulf of Lions. Female reproductive allocation and performance in anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) and sardine (Sardina pilchardus) were examined based on...

Data from: Trait-matching and mass effect determine the functional response of herbivore communities to land use intensification

Gaëtane Le Provost, Nicolas Gross, Luca Börger, Hélène Deraison, Marilyn Roncoroni & Isabelle Badenhausser
1. Trait-based approaches represent a promising way to understand how trophic interactions shape animal communities. The approach relies on the identification of the traits that mediate the linkages between adjacent trophic levels, i.e. “trait-matching”. Yet, how trait-matching explains the abundance and diversity of animal communities has been barely explored. This question may be particularly critical in the context of land use intensification, currently threatening biodiversity and associated ecosystem services. 2. We collected a large dataset...

Data from: Unexpected high vulnerability of functions in wilderness areas: evidence from coral reef fishes

Stephanie D'agata, Laurent Vigliola, Nickolas A.J. Graham, Laurent Wantiez, Valeriano Parravicini, Sébastien Villéger, Gérard Mou-Tham, Phillipe Frolla, Alan M. Friedlander, Michel Kulbicki, David Mouillot & Nicholas A. J. Graham
High species richness is thought to support the delivery of multiple ecosystem functions and services under changing environments. Yet, some species might perform unique functional roles while others are redundant. Thus, the benefits of high species richness in maintaining ecosystem functioning are uncertain if functions have little redundancy, potentially leading to high vulnerability of functions. We studied the natural propensity of assemblages to be functionally buffered against loss prior to fishing activities, using functional trait...

Data from: Genetic hitchhiking and resistance evolution to transgenic Bt toxins: insights from the African stalk borer Busseola fusca (Noctuidae)

Pascal Campagne, Claire Capdevielle-Dulac, Rémy Pasquet, Stephen J. Cornell, Marlene Vanrooyen-Kruger, Jean-François Silvain, Bruno LeRu & Johnnie Van Den Berg
Since transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins were first released, resistance evolution leading to failure in control of pests populations has been observed in a number of species. Field resistance of the moth Busseola fusca was acknowledged 8 years after Bt maize was introduced in South Africa. Since then, field resistance of this corn borer has been observed at several locations, raising questions about the nature, distribution and dynamics of the resistance trait. Using...

Data from: Seascape and life-history traits do not predict self-recruitment in a coral reef fish

Marcela Herrera, Gerrit B. Nanninga, Serge Planes, Geoffrey P. Jones, Simon R. Thorrold, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Glenn R. Almany & Michael L. Berumen
The persistence and resilience of many coral reef species are dependent on rates of connectivity among sub-populations. However, despite increasing research efforts, the spatial scale of larval dispersal remains unpredictable for most marine metapopulations. Here, we assess patterns of larval dispersal in the angelfish Centropyge bicolor in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, using parentage and sibling reconstruction analyses based on 23 microsatellite DNA loci. We found that, contrary to previous findings in this system, self-recruitment...

Data from: Initial genetic diversity enhances population establishment and alters genetic structuring of a newly established Daphnia metapopulation

Christopher J. Holmes, Jelena H. Pantel, Kimberly L. Schulz & Carla E. Cáceres
When newly created habitats are initially colonized by genotypes with rapid population growth rates, later arriving colonists may be prevented from establishing. Although these priority effects have been documented in multiple systems, their duration may be influenced by the diversity of the founding population. We conducted a large-scale field manipulation to investigate how initial clonal diversity influences temporal and landscape patterns of genetic structure in a developing metapopulation. Six genotypes of obligately asexual Daphnia pulex...

Data from: Spatio-temporal modelling of auk abundance after the Erika oil spill and implications for conservation

Kévin Le Rest, Grégoire Certain, Benjamin Debétencourt & Vincent Bretagnolle
Species distribution models are widely used in applied ecology and conservation. While accounting for spatial dependences is now the rule, temporal dependences have rarely been dealt with explicitly. In this study, we analyse wintering auk distribution in the Bay of Biscay and English Channel and estimate changes in abundance within and between years while accounting for space–time dependencies. We then propose a retrospective estimate of the impact of the Erika oil spill that occurred in...

Data from: Adaptation to climate through flowering phenology: a case study in Medicago truncatula

Concetta Burgarella, Nathalie Chantret, Laurène Gay, Jean-Marie Prosperi, Maxime Bonhomme, Peter Tiffin, Nevin D. Young & Joelle Ronfort
Local climatic conditions likely constitute an important selective pressure on genes underlying important fitness-related traits such as flowering time and in many species flowering phenology and climatic gradients strongly covary. To test whether climate shapes genetic variation on flowering time genes and to identify candidate flowering genes involved in the adaptation to environmental heterogeneity, we used a large M. truncatula core collection to examine the association between nucleotide polymorphisms at 224 candidate genes and both...

Data from: Reinvestigation of Protelytron permianum (Insecta; Early Permian; USA) as an example for applying reflectance transformation imaging to insect imprint fossils

Olivier Béthoux, Artémis Llamosi & Séverine Toussaint
We reinvestigated the holotype of Protelytron permianum, one of the earliest putative stem-dermapteran (i.e. stem-earwig). We recurred to reflectance transformation imaging (RTI) to deliver exhaustive and interactive photographic data. We were able to ascertain the occurrence of broadenings located along veins of the hind wing vannus and forming an arc, as well as a series of radiating folds, alternatively concave and convex. Such an organization is diagnostic of Dermaptera, in which it is indicative of...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    126

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    126

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    126
  • University of Montpellier
    9
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    8
  • Sorbonne University
    6
  • University of Toulouse
    5
  • University of Lyon System
    5
  • University of Aberdeen
    4
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    3
  • Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
    3
  • Paul Sabatier University
    3