112 Works

Data from: Population differentiation or species formation across the Indian and the Pacific Oceans? An example from the brooding marine hydrozoan Macrorhynchia phoenicea

Bautisse Postaire, Pauline Gélin, J. Henrich Bruggemann, Marine Pratlong & Helene Magalon
Assessing population connectivity is necessary to construct effective marine protected areas. This connectivity depends, among other parameters, inherently on species dispersal capacities. Isolation by distance (IBD) is one of the main modes of differentiation in marine species, above all in species presenting low dispersal abilities. This study reports the genetic structuring in the tropical hydrozoan Macrorhynchia phoenicea α (sensu Postaire et al., 2016a), a brooding species, from 30 sampling sites in the Western Indian Ocean...

Data from: Habitat-related variation in the plasticity of a UV sensitive photoreceptor over a small spatial scale in the palmate newt

Jean Secondi, Mélissa Martin, Delphine Goven, Pascal Mège, Stéphane Sourice & Marc Théry
Plastic phenotypes are expected to be favoured in heterogeneous environments compared with stable environments. Sensory systems are interesting to test this theory because they are costly to produce and support, and strong fitness costs are expected if they are not tuned to the local environment. Consistently, the visual system of several species changes with the conditions experienced during early development. However, there is little information on whether the amplitude of the change, i.e. the reaction...

Data from: Resource composition mediates the effects of intraspecific variability in nutrient recycling on ecosystem processes

Charlotte Evangelista, Antoine Lecerf, J. Robert Britton & Julien Cucherousset
Despite the growing evidence for individual variation in trophic niche within populations, its potential indirect effects on ecosystem processes remains poorly understood. In particular, few studies have investigated how intraspecific trophic variability can modulate the effects of consumers on ecosystems through potential changes in nutrient excretion rates. Here, we first quantified the level of intraspecific trophic variability in 11 wild populations of the omnivorous fish Lepomis gibbosus. Outputs from stomach content and stable isotope analyses...

Data from: Pulsed food resources, but not forest cover, determines lifetime reproductive success in a forest-dwelling rodent

Katrine S. Hoset, Alexandre Villers, Ralf Wistbacka & Vesa Selonen
1. The relative contributions of habitat and food availability on fitness may provide evidence for key habitat features needed to safeguard population persistence. However, defining habitat quality for a species can be a complex task, especially if knowledge on the relationship between individual performance and habitat quality is lacking. 2. Here, we determined the relative importance of availability of suitable forest habitat, body mass, and food from masting tree species on female lifetime reproductive success...

Data from: Evidence for a genetic sex determination in Cnidaria, the Mediterranean red coral (Corallium rubrum)

Marine Pratlong, Anne Haguenauer, Sandrine Chenesseau, Kelly Brener, Guillaume Mitta, Eve Toulza, M. Bonabaud, S. Rialle, Didier Aurelle & Pierre Pontarotti
Sexual reproduction is widespread among eukaryotes, and the sex-determining processes vary greatly among species. While genetic sex determination (GSD) has been intensively described in bilaterian species, no example has yet been recorded among non-bilaterians. However, the quasi-ubiquitous repartition of GSD among multicellular species suggests that similar evolutionary forces can promote this system, and that these forces could occur also in non-bilaterians. Studying sex determination across the range of Metazoan diversity is indeed important to understand...

Data from: Boldness predicts an individual's position along an exploration-exploitation foraging trade-off

Samantha C. Patrick, David Pinaud & Henri Weimerskirch
Individuals do not have complete information about the environment and therefore they face a trade-off between gathering information (exploration) and gathering resources (exploitation). Studies have shown individual differences in components of this trade-off but how stable these strategies are in a population and the intrinsic drivers of these differences is not well understood. Top marine predators are expected to experience a particularly strong trade-off as many species have large foraging ranges and their prey often...

Data from: Combining noninvasive genetics and a new mammalian sex-linked marker provides new tools to investigate population size, structure and individual behaviour: an application to bats

Diane Zarzoso-Lacoste, Pierre-Loup Jan, Lisa Lehnen, Thomas Girard, Anne-Laure Besnard, Sebastien J. Puechmaille & Eric J. Petit
Monitoring wild populations is crucial for their effective management. Noninvasive genetic methods provide robust data from individual free-ranging animals, which can be used in capture-mark-recapture (CMR) models to estimate demographic parameters without capturing or disturbing them. However, sex- and status-specific behaviour, which may lead to differences in detection probabilities, is rarely considered in monitoring. Here, we investigated population size, sex ratio, sex- and status-related behaviour in 19 Rhinolophus hipposideros maternity colonies (Northern France) with a...

Data from: Landscape features impact connectivity between soil populations: a comparative study of gene flow in earthworms

Lise Dupont, Magally Torres-Leguizamon, Peggy René-Corail & Jérôme Mathieu
Landscape features are known to alter the spatial genetic variation of aboveground organisms. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the genetic structure of belowground organisms also responds to landscape structure. Microsatellite markers were used to carry out a landscape genetic study of two endogeic earthworm species, Allolobophora chlorotica (N = 440, eight microsatellites) and Aporrectodea icterica (N = 519, seven microsatellites), in an agricultural landscape in the North of France, where landscape features were characterized...

Data from: Empirical phylogenies and species abundance distributions are consistent with pre-equilibrium dynamics of neutral community models with gene flow

Anne-Sophie Bonnet-Lebrun, Andrea Manica, Anders Eriksson, Ana S.L. Rodrigues & Ana S. L. Rodrigues
Community characteristics reflect past ecological and evolutionary dynamics. Here, we investigate whether it is possible to obtain realistically shaped modelled communities – i.e., with phylogenetic trees and species abundance distributions shaped similarly to typical empirical bird and mammal communities – from neutral community models. To test the effect of gene flow, we contrasted two spatially explicit individual-based neutral models: one with protracted speciation, delayed by gene flow, and one with point mutation speciation, unaffected by...

Data from: Asexual queen succession mediates an accelerated colony life cycle in the termite Silvestritermes minutus

Romain Fougeyrollas, Jan Křivánek, Virginie Roy, Klára Dolejšová, Sophie Frechault, Yves Roisin, Robert Hanus & David Sillam-Dussès
Mixed modes of reproduction, combining sexual processes with thelytokous parthenogenesis, occur in all major clades of social insects. In several species of termites, queens maximize their genetic input into nondispersing replacement queens through parthenogenesis, while maintaining genetically diverse sterile offspring and dispersing reproductives via sexual reproduction. This so-called asexual queen succession (AQS) has multiple independent origins and its presumed advantages are diverse as well, ranging from multiplication of colony reproductive potential to extension of its...

Data from: The double edged sword: the demographic consequences of the evolution of self-fertilisation

Diala Abu Awad & Sylvain Billiard
Phylogenies indicate that the transition from outcrossing to selfing is frequent, with selfing populations being more prone to extinction. The rates of transition to selfing and extinction, acting on different timescales, could explain the observed distributions of extant selfing species among taxa. However, phylogenetic and theoretical studies consider these mechanisms independently, i.e. transitions do not cause extinction. Here, we theoretically explore the demographic consequences of the evolution of self-fertilization. Deleterious mutations and mutations modifying the...

Data from: The effects of climate change on a mega-diverse country: predicted shifts in mammalian species richness and turnover in continental Ecuador.

Paula Iturralde-Pólit, Olivier Dangles, Santiago F. Burneo & Christine N. Meynard
Ecuador is one of 17 nations with the greatest diversity in the world, sheltering lowland and mountain regions that are considered global biodiversity hotspots. While these regions are projected to be highly impacted by climate change, it is not clear what would be the consequences for faunal diversity and conservation. To address this issue, we used an ensemble of 8 species distribution models (SDM) to determine future shifts and identify areas of high changes in...

Data from: The functional syndrome: linking individual trait variability to ecosystem functioning

Allan Raffard, Antoine Lecerf, Julien Cote, Mathieu Buoro, Remy Lassus & Julien Cucherousset
Phenotypic variability is increasingly assessed through functional response and effect traits, which provide a mechanistic framework for investigating how an organism responds to varying ecological factors and how these responses affect ecosystem functioning. Covariation between response and effect traits has been poorly examined at the intraspecific level, thus hampering progress in understanding how phenotypic variability alters the role of organisms in ecosystems. Using a multi-trait approach and a nine-month longitudinal monitoring of individual red-swamp crayfish...

Data from: Chaos and the (un)predictability of evolution in a changing environment

Artur Rego Costa, Florence Débarre, Luis-Miguel Chevin & Artur Rego-Costa
Among the factors that may reduce the predictability of evolution, chaos, characterized by a strong dependence on initial conditions, has received much less attention than randomness due to genetic drift or environmental stochasticity. It was recently shown that chaos in phenotypic evolution arises commonly under frequency-dependent selection caused by competitive interactions mediated by many traits. This result has been used to argue that chaos should often make evolutionary dynamics unpredictable. However, populations also evolve largely...

Data from: Booming far: the long-range vocal strategy of a lekking bird

Clément Cornec, Yves Hingrat, Thierry Aubin & Fanny Rybak
The pressures of selection acting on transmission of information by acoustic signals are particularly high in long-distance communication networks. Males of the North African houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata undulata) produce extremely low-frequency vocalizations called 'booms' as a component of their courtship displays. These displays are performed on sites separated by a distance of on average 550 m, constituting exploded leks. Here, we investigate the acoustic features of booms involved in species-specific identity. We first assessed...

Data from: Markov-modulated Poisson processes as a new framework for analyzing capture-recapture data

Rémi Choquet
1.Opportunistic capture-recapture data consists of observations over non-constant time-intervals and so fails to satisfy the basic assumptions of traditional capture-recapture models. Analyzing opportunistic capture-recapture data is often done by discretizing time-intervals or summarizing data, but without taking into account the continuous-time process of the state and/or the capture. 2.To deal with non-constant time-intervals, continuous-time closed capture-recapture models have been proposed by Yip et al. (1996), Hwang & Chao (2002), Schofield et al. (2017) for estimating...

Data from: Landscape genetic analyses reveal fine-scale effects of forest fragmentation in an insular tropical bird

Aurélie Khimoun, William Peterman, Cyril Eraud, Bruno Faivre, Nicolas Navarro & Stéphane Garnier
Within the framework of landscape genetics, resistance surface modelling is particularly relevant to explicitly test competing hypotheses about landscape effects on gene flow. To investigate how fragmentation of tropical forest affects population connectivity in a forest specialist bird species, we optimized resistance surfaces without a priori specification, using least-cost (LCP) or resistance (IBR) distances. We implemented a two-step procedure in order (i) to objectively define the landscape thematic resolution (level of detail in classification scheme...

Data from: A test of the hierarchical model of litter decomposition

Mark A. Bradford, G. F. Veen, Anne Bonis, Ella M. Bradford, Aimee T. Classen, J. Hans C. Cornelissen, Thomas W. Crowther, Jonathan R. De Long, Gregoire T. Freschet, Paul Kardol, Marta Manrubia-Freixa, Daniel S. Maynard, Gregory S. Newman, Richard S. P. Van Logtestijn, Maria Viketoft, David A. Wardle, William R. Wieder, Stephen A. Wood & Wim H. Van Der Putten
Our basic understanding of plant litter decomposition informs the assumptions underlying widely applied soil biogeochemical models, including those embedded in Earth system models. Confidence in projected carbon cycle-climate feedbacks therefore depends on accurate knowledge about the controls regulating the rate at which plant biomass is decomposed into products such as CO2. Here, we test underlying assumptions of the dominant conceptual model of litter decomposition. The model posits that a primary control on the rate of...

Data from: Mowing exacerbates the loss of ecosystem stability under nitrogen enrichment in a temperate grassland

Yunhai Zhang, Michel Loreau, Nianpeng He, Guangming Zhang & Xingguo Han
Summary: 1. Global reactive nitrogen (N) is projected to further increase in the coming years. Previous studies have demonstrated that N enrichment weakens the temporal stability of ecosystem primary productivity through decreased biodiversity and species asynchrony. Mowing is a globally common practice in grasslands; and infrequent mowing can maintain or increase plant diversity under N enrichment conditions. However, it is unclear how infrequent mowing affects ecosystem stability in the face of N enrichment. 2. By...

Data from: Assortative mating by colored ornaments in blue tits: space and time matter

Amélie Fargevieille, Arnaud Grégoire, Anne Charmantier, Maria Del Rey Granado & Claire Doutrelant
Assortative mating is a potential outcome of sexual selection and estimating its level is important to better understand local adaptation and underlying trait evolution. However, assortative mating studies frequently base their conclusions on small numbers of individuals sampled over short periods of time and limited spatial scales even though spatiotemporal variation is common. Here, we characterized assortative mating patterns over 10 years in four populations of the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus), a passerine bird. We...

Data from: The route of infection determines Wolbachia antibacterial protection in Drosophila

Vanika Gupta, Radhakrishnan B. Vasanthakrishnan, Jonathon Siva-Jothy, Katy M. Monteith, Sam P. Brown & Pedro F. Vale
Bacterial symbionts are widespread among metazoans and provide a range of beneficial functions. Wolbachia-mediated protection against viral infection has been extensively demonstrated in Drosophila. In mosquitoes that are artificially transinfected with Drosophila melanogaster Wolbachia (wMel), protection from both viral and bacterial infections has been demonstrated. However, no evidence for Wolbachia-mediated antibacterial protection has been demonstrated in Drosophila to date. Here, we show that the route of infection is key for Wolbachia-mediated antibacterial protection. Drosophila melanogaster...

Data from: Evolution of virulence under intensive farming: salmon lice increase skin lesions and reduce host growth in salmon farms

Mathias S. Ugelvik, Arne Skorping, Olav Moberg & Adele Mennerat
Parasites rely on resources from a host and are selected to achieve an optimal combination of transmission and virulence. Human-induced changes in parasite ecology, such as intensive farming of hosts, might not only favor increased parasite abundances, but also alter the selection acting on parasites and lead to life history evolution. The trade-off between transmission and virulence could be affected by intensive farming practices such as high host density and the use of anti-parasitic drugs,...

Data from: Offspring telomere length in the long lived Alpine swift is negatively related to the age of their biological father and foster mother

François Criscuolo, Sandrine Zahn & Pierre Bize
A growing body of studies is showing that offspring telomere length (TL) can be influenced by the age of their parents. Such a relationship might be explained by variation in TL at conception (gamete effect) and/or by alteration of early growth conditions in species providing parental care. In a long-lived bird with bi-parental care, the Alpine swift (Apus melba), we exchanged an uneven number of 2 to 4-day-old nestlings between pairs as part of a...

Data from: High-throughput sequencing of transposable element insertions suggests adaptive evolution of the invasive Asian Tiger Mosquito towards temperate environments

Clément Goubert, Hélène Henri, Guillaume Minard, Claire Valiente Moro, Patrick Mavingui, Cristina Vieira & Matthieu Boulesteix
Invasive species represent unique opportunities to evaluate the role of local adaptation during colonization of new environments. Among these species, the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a threatening vector of several human viral diseases, including dengue and chikungunya, and raises concerns about the Zika fever. Its broad presence in both temperate and tropical environments has been considered the reflection of great “ecological plasticity.” However, no study has been conducted to assess the role of...

Data from: Habitat filtering determines the functional niche occupancy of plant communities worldwide

Yuanzhi Li, Bill Shipley, Jodi N. Price, Vinícius De L. Dantas, Riin Tamme, Mark Westoby, Andrew Siefert, Brandon S. Schamp, Marko J. Spasojevic, Vincent Jung, Daniel C. Laughlin, Sarah J. Richardson, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Christian Schöb, Antonio Gazol, Honor C. Prentice, Nicolas Gross, Jacob Overton, Marcus V. Cianciaruso, Frédérique Louault, Chiho Kamiyama, Tohru Nakashizuka, Kouki Hikosaka, Takehiro Sasaki, Masatoshi Katabuchi … & Marco A. Batalha
How the patterns of niche occupancy vary from species-poor to species-rich communities is a fundamental question in ecology that has a central bearing on the processes that drive patterns of biodiversity. As species richness increases, habitat filtering should constrain the expansion of total niche volume, while limiting similarity should restrict the degree of niche overlap between species. Here, by explicitly incorporating intraspecific trait variability, we investigate the relationship between functional niche occupancy and species richness...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    112

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    112

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    112
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    6
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    5
  • Paul Sabatier University
    5
  • University of Paris-Sud
    4
  • University of Montpellier
    4
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    3
  • University of Toulouse
    3
  • Aarhus University
    3
  • University of Lyon System
    3