112 Works

Data from: When earwig mothers do not care to share: parent-offspring competition and the evolution of family life

Jos Kramer, Maximilian Körner, Janina Diehl, Christine Scheiner, Aytül Yüksel-Dadak, Teresa Christl, Philip Kohlmeier, Joël Meunier & Janina M. C. Diehl
1. Kin competition often reduces – and sometimes entirely negates – the benefits of cooperation among relatives, and hence is often regarded as central process in social evolution. Surprisingly, however, our understanding of the role of kin competition in the evolution of family life remains fragmentary, despite the close scrutiny it received in studies on sibling rivarly. This is because much less attention has been given to local competition between parents and their offspring, and...

Data from: Water restriction causes an intergenerational trade-off and delayed mother-offspring conflict in a viviparous lizard

Andréaz Dupoué, Jean-François Le Galliard, Rémy Josserand, Dale F. DeNardo, Béatriz Decencière, Simon Agostini, Caludy Haussy & Sandrine Meylan
1. Parenting is costly and because the relationship between the mother and embryos is not mutualistic, mother-offspring conflicts may exist whenever resource are scarce. However, intergenerational trade-offs and conflicts resulting from limited access to water, a vital and depreciable resource, remain largely overlooked. 2. In this study, we examined the physiological, reproductive and life history responses to water restriction in the European Common Lizard (Zootoca vivipara). We hypothesised that, under water-limited conditions, pregnant females experience...

Data from: When new human-modified habitats favor the expansion of an amphibian pioneer species: evolutionary history of the natterjack toad (Bufo calamita) in a coal basin

Leslie Faucher, Laura Henocq, Cédric Vanappelghem, Stéphanie Rondel, Robin Quevillart, Sophie Gallina, Cécile Godé, Julie Jaquiery & Jean-François Arnaud
Human activities affect microevolutionary dynamics by inducing environmental changes. In particular, land cover conversion and loss of native habitats decrease genetic diversity and jeopardize the adaptive ability of populations. Nonetheless, new anthropogenic habitats can also promote the successful establishment of emblematic pioneer species. We investigated this issue by examining the population genetic features and evolutionary history of the natterjack toad (Bufo [Epidalea] calamita) in northern France, where populations can be found in native coastal habitats...

Data from: Does detection range matter for inferring social networks in a benthic shark using acoustic telemetry?

Johann Mourier, Nathan Charles Bass, Tristan L. Guttridge, Joanna Day & Culum Brown
Accurately estimating contacts between animals can be critical in ecological studies such as examining social structure, predator–prey interactions or transmission of information and disease. While biotelemetry has been used successfully for such studies in terrestrial systems, it is still under development in the aquatic environment. Acoustic telemetry represents an attractive tool to investigate spatio-temporal behaviour of marine fish and has recently been suggested for monitoring underwater animal interactions. To evaluate the effectiveness of acoustic telemetry...

Data from: Comparative analysis of DNA extraction methods to study the body surface microbiota of insects: a case study with ant cuticular bacteria

Caroline Birer, Niklas Tysklind, Lucie Zinger & Christophe Duplais
High-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene has considerably helped revealing the essential role of bacteria living on insect cuticles in the ecophysiology and behavior of their hosts. However, our understanding of host-cuticular microbiota feedbacks remains hampered by the difficulties to working with low bacterial DNA quantities as in individual insect cuticle samples, which are more prone to molecular biases and contaminations. Herein, we conducted a methodological benchmark on the cuticular bacterial loads retrieved from...

Data from: Implications of plant functional traits and drought survival strategies for ecological restoration

Jennifer A. Balachowski & Florence A. Volaire
1. Restoration of degraded grasslands through active revegetation often involves reestablishing populations of native grasses, which must withstand increasing drought stress to persist beyond initial establishment.. In perennial species, superior dehydration tolerance is expected to result in more conservative growth, but this tradeoff has seldom been studied among populations of herbaceous species. 2. We measured seasonal growth and foliar and root functional traits under non-limiting water conditions, followed by recovery after severe drought in four...

Data from: Lock-picks: fungal infection facilitates the intrusion of strangers into ant colonies

Enikő Csata, Natalia Timuș, Magdalena Witek, Luca Pietro Casacci, Christophe Lucas, Anne-Geneviève Bagnères, Anna Sztencel-Jabłonka, Francesca Barbero, Simona Bonelli, László Rákosy & Bálint Marko
Studies investigating host-parasite systems rarely deal with multispecies interactions, and mostly explore impacts on hosts as individuals. Much less is known about the effects at colony level, when parasitism involves host organisms that form societies. We surveyed the effect of an ectoparasitic fungus, Rickia wasmannii, on kin-discrimination abilities of its host ant, Myrmica scabrinodis, identifying potential consequences at social level and subsequent changes in colony infiltration success of other organisms. Analyses of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs),...

Data from: Interacting effects of unobserved heterogeneity and individual stochasticity in the life-history of the Southern fulmar

Stéphanie Jenouvrier, Lise M. Aubry, Christophe Barbraud, Henri Weimerskirch & Hal Caswell
1.Individuals are heterogeneous in many ways. Some of these differences are incorporated as individual states (e.g., age, size, breeding status) in population models. However, substantial amounts of heterogeneity may remain unaccounted for, due to unmeasurable genetic, maternal, or environmental factors. 2.Such unobserved heterogeneity (UH) affects the behavior of heterogeneous cohorts via intra-cohort selection and contributes to inter-individual variance in demographic outcomes such as longevity and lifetime reproduction. Variance is also produced by individual stochasticity, due...

Data from: A novel locus on chromosome 1 underlies the evolution of a melanic plumage polymorphism in a wild songbird

Yann X.C. Bourgeois, Boris Delahaie, Mathieu Gautier, Emeline Lhuillier, Pierre-Jean G. Malé, Joris A.M. Bertrand, Josselin Cornuault, Kazumasa Wakamatsu, Olivier Bouchez, Claire Mould, Jade Bruxaux, Hélène Holota, Borja Mila, Christophe Thébaud, Joris A. M. Bertrand & Yann X. C. Bourgeois
Understanding the mechanisms responsible for phenotypic diversification within and among species ultimately rests with linking naturally occurring mutations to functionally and ecologically significant traits. Colour polymorphisms are of great interest in this context because discrete colour patterns within a population are often controlled by just a few genes in a common environment. We investigated how and why phenotypic diversity arose and persists in the Zosterops borbonicus white-eye of Reunion (Mascarene archipelago), a colour polymorphic songbird...

Data from: Resurrection ecology in Artemia

Thomas Lenormand, Odrade Nougué, Roula Jabbour-Zahab, Fabien Arnaud, Laurent Dezileau, Luis-Miguel Chevin & Marta I. Sanchez
Resurrection Ecology (RE) is a very powerful approach to address a wide range of question in ecology and evolution. This approach rests on using appropriate model systems, and only few are known to be available. In this paper, we show that Artemia has multiple attractive features (short generation time, cyst bank and collections, well documented phylogeography and ecology) for a good RE model. We show in detail with a case study how cysts can be...

Data from: An a posteriori species clustering for quantifying the effects of species interactions on ecosystem functioning

Benoît Jaillard, Camille Richon, Philippe Deleporte, Michel Loreau & Cyrille Violle
1. Quantifying the effects of species interactions is key to understanding the relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning but remains elusive due to combinatorics issues. Functional groups have been commonly used to capture the diversity of forms and functions and thus simplify the reality. However, the explicit incorporation of species interactions is still lacking in functional group-based approaches. Here we propose a new approach based on an a posteriori clustering of species to quantify the...

Data from: Testing determinants of the annual individual fitness: an overall mean mixture model for de-lifing data

Pierre Dupont, Dominique Allainé, Aurélie Cohas & Roger Pradel
1. The de-lifing method (Coulson et al. 2006), though very promising for studying ecological and evolutionary changes, has been scarcely used to identify factors influential on fitness. 2. Through simulations representative of a variety of iteroparous species, we establish that a two-component normal mixture usually provides a much better representation of de-lifing data than the single normal distribution assumed in classical linear models. 3. To test determinants of the annual individual fitness, we propose the...

Data from: Parallel evolution of behaviour during independent host-shifts following maize introduction into Asia and Europe

Vincent Calcagno, Clémentine Mitoyen, Philippe Audiot, Sergine Ponsard, Giu-Zhen Gao, Zhao-Zhi Lu, Zhen-Ying Wang, Kang-Lai He, Denis Bourguet & Gui-Zhen Gao
Maize was introduced into opposite sides of Eurasia 500 years ago, in Western Europe and in Asia. This caused two host-shifts in the phytophagous genus Ostrinia, O. nubilalis (the European corn borer; ECB) and O. furnacalis (the Asian corn borer; ACB) are now major pests of maize worldwide. They originated independently from Dicot-feeding ancestors, similar to O. scapulalis (the Adzuki bean borer; ABB). Unlike other host-plants, maize is yearly harvested, and harvesting practices impose severe...

Data from: Very high MHC Class IIB diversity without spatial differentiation in the Mediterranean population of Greater Flamingos

Mark A. F. Gillingham, Arnaud Béchet, Alexandre Courtiol, Manuel Rendón-Martos, Juan A. Amat, Boudjéma Samraoui, Ortaç Onmuş, Simone Sommer & Frank Cézilly
Background: Selective pressure from pathogens is thought to shape the allelic diversity of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in vertebrates. In particular, both local adaptation to pathogens and gene flow are thought to explain a large part of the intraspecific variation observed in MHC allelic diversity. To date, however, evidence that adaptation to locally prevalent pathogens maintains MHC variation is limited to species with limited dispersal and, hence, reduced gene flow. On the one hand...

Data from: A multispecies approach reveals hot-spots and cold-spots of diversity and connectivity in invertebrate species with contrasting dispersal modes

Abigail E. Cahill, Aurelien De Jode, Sophie Dubois, Zoheir Bouzaza, Didier Aurelle, Emilie Boissin, Olivier Chabrol, Romain David, Emilie Egea, Jean-Baptiste Ledoux, Bastien Merigot, Alexandra Anh-Thu Weber & Anne Chenuil
Genetic diversity is crucial for species’ maintenance and persistence, yet is often overlooked in conservation studies. Species diversity is more often reported due to practical constraints, but it is unknown if these measures of diversity are correlated. In marine invertebrates, adults are often sessile or sedentary and populations exchange genes via dispersal of gametes and larvae. Species with a larval period are expected to have more connected populations than those without larval dispersal. We assessed...

Data from: Effects of inbreeding on a gregarious parasitoid wasp with complementary sex determination

Tania Zaviezo, Romina Retamal, Teddy Urvois, Xavier Fauvergue, Aurelie Blin & Thibaut Malausa
Inbreeding and inbreeding depression are processes in small populations of particular interest for a range of human activities such as animal breeding, species conservation or pest management. In particular, biological control programs should benefit from a thorough understanding of the causes and consequences of inbreeding because natural enemies experience repetitive bottlenecks during importation, laboratory rearing, and introduction. Predicting the effect of inbreeding in Hymenopteran parasitoid wasps, frequently used in biological control programs, is nonetheless a...

Data from: Testing models of refugial isolation, colonization and population connectivity in two species of montane salamanders

Sean M. Rovito & Sean D. Schoville
Pleistocene glaciations have profoundly affected patterns of genetic diversity within many species. Temperate alpine organisms likely experienced dramatic range shifts, given that much of their habitat was glaciated during this time. While the effects of glaciations are relatively well understood, the spatial locations of refugia and processes that gave rise to current patterns of diversity are less well known. We use a microsatellite data set to test hypotheses of population connectivity and refugial isolation in...

Data from: A reassessment of explanations for discordant introgressions of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes

Timothée Bonnet, Raphaël Leblois, Francois Rousset & Pierre-André Crochet
Hybridization is increasingly recognized as a significant evolutionary process, in particular because it can lead to introgression of genes from one species to another. A striking pattern of discordance in the amount of introgression between mitochondrial and nuclear markers exists such that substantial mitochondrial introgression is often found in combination with no or little nuclear introgression. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to explain this discordance, including positive selection for introgressing mitochondrial variants, several types of...

Data from: Metapopulation patterns of additive and nonadditive genetic variance in the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

Bruno Guinand, Marc Vandeputte, Mathilde Dupont-Nivet, Alain Vergnet, Pierrick Haffray, Hervé Chavanne & Béatrice Chatain
Describing and explaining the geographic within-species variation in phenotypes (“phenogeography”) in the sea over a species distribution range is central to our understanding of a variety of eco-evolutionary topics. However, phenogeographic studies that have a large potential to investigate adaptive variation are overcome by phylogeographic studies, still mainly focusing on neutral markers. How genotypic and phenotypic data could covary over large geographic scales remains poorly understood in marine species. We crossed 75 noninbred sires (five...

Data from: Processing of acceleration and dive data on-board satellite relay tags to investigate diving and foraging behaviour in free-ranging marine predators

Sam L. Cox, Florian Orgeret, Mathieu Gesta, Charles Rodde, I. Heizer, Henri Weimerskirch & Christophe Guinet
1. Biologging technologies are changing the way in which the marine environment is observed and monitored. However, because device retrieval is generally required to access the high resolution data they collect, use is generally restricted to those animals that predictably return to land. Data abstraction and transmission techniques aim to address this, although currently these are limited in scope and do not incorporate, for example, acceleration measurements which can quantify animal behaviours and movement patterns...

Data from: The fitness effect of mutations across environments: Fisher’s geometrical model with multiple optima

Guillaume Martin & Thomas Lenormand
When are mutations beneficial in one environment and deleterious in another? More generally, what is the relationship between mutation effects across environments? These questions are crucial to predict adaptation in heterogeneous conditions in a broad sense. Empirical evidence documents various patterns of fitness effects across environments but we still lack a framework to analyse these multivariate data. In this paper, we extend Fisher’s geometrical model to multiple environments determining distinct peaks. We derive the fitness...

Data from: The functional syndrome: linking individual trait variability to ecosystem functioning

Allan Raffard, Antoine Lecerf, Julien Cote, Mathieu Buoro, Remy Lassus & Julien Cucherousset
Phenotypic variability is increasingly assessed through functional response and effect traits, which provide a mechanistic framework for investigating how an organism responds to varying ecological factors and how these responses affect ecosystem functioning. Covariation between response and effect traits has been poorly examined at the intraspecific level, thus hampering progress in understanding how phenotypic variability alters the role of organisms in ecosystems. Using a multi-trait approach and a nine-month longitudinal monitoring of individual red-swamp crayfish...

Data from: Habitat-related variation in the plasticity of a UV sensitive photoreceptor over a small spatial scale in the palmate newt

Jean Secondi, Mélissa Martin, Delphine Goven, Pascal Mège, Stéphane Sourice & Marc Théry
Plastic phenotypes are expected to be favoured in heterogeneous environments compared with stable environments. Sensory systems are interesting to test this theory because they are costly to produce and support, and strong fitness costs are expected if they are not tuned to the local environment. Consistently, the visual system of several species changes with the conditions experienced during early development. However, there is little information on whether the amplitude of the change, i.e. the reaction...

Data from: Boldness predicts an individual's position along an exploration-exploitation foraging trade-off

Samantha C. Patrick, David Pinaud & Henri Weimerskirch
Individuals do not have complete information about the environment and therefore they face a trade-off between gathering information (exploration) and gathering resources (exploitation). Studies have shown individual differences in components of this trade-off but how stable these strategies are in a population and the intrinsic drivers of these differences is not well understood. Top marine predators are expected to experience a particularly strong trade-off as many species have large foraging ranges and their prey often...

Data from: Markov-modulated Poisson processes as a new framework for analyzing capture-recapture data

Rémi Choquet
1.Opportunistic capture-recapture data consists of observations over non-constant time-intervals and so fails to satisfy the basic assumptions of traditional capture-recapture models. Analyzing opportunistic capture-recapture data is often done by discretizing time-intervals or summarizing data, but without taking into account the continuous-time process of the state and/or the capture. 2.To deal with non-constant time-intervals, continuous-time closed capture-recapture models have been proposed by Yip et al. (1996), Hwang & Chao (2002), Schofield et al. (2017) for estimating...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    112

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    112

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    112
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    6
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    5
  • Paul Sabatier University
    5
  • University of Paris-Sud
    4
  • University of Montpellier
    4
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    3
  • University of Toulouse
    3
  • Aarhus University
    3
  • University of Lyon System
    3