112 Works

Data from: Food availability modulates differences in parental effort between dispersing and philopatric birds

Charlotte Récapet, Pierre Bize & Blandine Doligez
Dispersal entails costs and might have to be traded off against other life-history traits. Dispersing and philopatric individuals may thus exhibit alternative life-history strategies. Importantly, these differences could also partly be modulated by environmental variation. Our previous results in a patchy population of a small passerine, the collared flycatcher, suggest that, as breeding density, a proxy of habitat quality, decreases, dispersing individuals invest less in reproduction but maintain a stable oxidative balance, whereas philopatric individuals...

Data from: Generalized bootstrap supports for phylogenetic analyses of protein sequences incorporating alignment uncertainty

Maria Chatzou, Evan Wade Floden, Paolo Di Tommaso, Olivier Gascuel & Cedric Notredame
Phylogenetic reconstructions are essential in genomics data analyses and depend on accurate multiple sequence alignment (MSA) models. We show that all currently available large-scale progressive multiple alignment methods are numerically unstable when dealing with amino-acid sequences. They produce significantly different output when changing sequence input order. We used the HOMFAM protein sequences dataset to show that on datasets larger than 100 sequences, this instability affects on average 21.5% of the aligned residues. The resulting Maximum...

Data from: Phylogenetically informed spatial planning is required to conserve the mammalian tree of life

Dan F. Rosauer, Laura J. Pollock, Simon Linke & Walter Jetz
In the face of the current extinction crisis and severely limited conservation resources, safeguarding the tree of life is increasingly recognized as a high priority. We conducted a first systematic global assessment of the conservation of phylogenetic diversity (PD) that uses realistic area targets and highlights the key areas for conservation of the mammalian tree of life. Our approach offers a substantially more effective conservation solution than one focused on species. In many locations, priorities...

Data from: Morphological integration in the appendicular skeleton of two domestic taxa: the horse and donkey

Pauline Hanot, Anthony Herrel, Claude Guintard & Raphaël Cornette
Organisms are organized into suites of anatomical structures that typically covary when developmentally or functionally related, and this morphological integration plays a determinant role in evolutionary processes. Artificial selection on domestic species causes strong morphological changes over short time spans, frequently resulting in a wide and exaggerated phenotypic diversity. This raises the question of whether integration constrains the morphological diversification of domestic species and how natural and artificial selection may impact integration patterns. Here, we...

Data from: Selection on skewed characters and the paradox of stasis

Suzanne Bonamour, Céline Teplitsky, Anne Charmantier, Pierre-André Crochet & Luis-Miguel Chevin
Observed phenotypic responses to selection in the wild often differ from predictions based on measurements of selection and genetic variance. An overlooked hypothesis to explain this paradox of stasis is that a skewed phenotypic distribution affects natural selection and evolution. We show through mathematical modelling that, when a trait selected for an optimum phenotype has a skewed distribution, directional selection is detected even at evolutionary equilibrium, where it causes no change in the mean phenotype....

Data from: A circannual perspective on daily and total flight distances in a long-distance migratory raptor, the Montagu's harrier, Circus pygargus

Almut E. Schlaich, Willem Bouten, Vincent Bretagnolle, Henning Heldbjerg, Raymond H. G. Klaassen, Iben H. Sørensen, Alexandre Villers & Christiaan Both
Long-distance migrants are particularly recognized for the distances covered on migration, yet little is known about the distances they cover during the rest of the year. GPS-tracks of 29 Montagu's harriers from breeding areas in France, The Netherlands and Denmark showed that harriers fly between 35 653 and 88 049 km yr−1, of which on average only 28.5% is on migration. Mean daily distances during migration were 296 km d−1 in autumn and 252 km...

Data from: Conserved G-matrices of morphological and life-history traits among continental and island blue tit populations

Boris Delahaie, Anne Charmantier, Stéphane Chantepie, Dany Garant, Melody Porlier & Céline Teplitsky
The genetic variance–covariance matrix (G-matrix) summarizes the genetic architecture of multiple traits. It has a central role in the understanding of phenotypic divergence and the quantification of the evolutionary potential of populations. Laboratory experiments have shown that G-matrices can vary rapidly under divergent selective pressures. However, because of the demanding nature of G-matrix estimation and comparison in wild populations, the extent of its spatial variability remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigate spatial variation...

Data from: An assessment of phylogenetic tools for analyzing the interplay between interspecific interactions and phenotypic evolution

Jonathan P. Drury, Gregory F. Grether, , Hélène Morlon & T Garland
Much ecological and evolutionary theory predicts that interspecific interactions often drive phenotypic diversification and that species phenotypes in turn influence species interactions. Several phylogenetic comparative methods have been developed to assess the importance of such processes in nature; however, the statistical properties of these methods have gone largely untested. Focusing mainly on scenarios of competition between closely-related species, we assess the performance of available comparative approaches for analyzing the interplay between interspecific interactions and species...

Data from: Among-individual heterogeneity in maternal behaviour and physiology affects reproductive allocation and offspring life-history traits in the garter snake Thamnophis elegans

Eric J. Gangloff, Amanda M. Sparkman & Anne M. Bronikowski
Accumulating evidence suggests that within-individual plasticity of behavioural and physiological traits is limited, resulting in stable among-individual differences in these aspects of the phenotype. Furthermore, these traits often covary within individuals, resulting in a continuum of correlated phenotypic variation among individuals within populations and species. This heterogeneity, in turn, affects individual fitness and can have cross-generational effects. Patterns of trait covariation, among-individual differences, and subsequent fitness consequences have long been recognized in reptiles. Here, we...

Data from: Aging parasites produce offspring with poor fitness prospects

Cédric Lippens, Bruno Faivre, Clothilde Lechenault & Gabriele Sorci
Senescing individuals have poor survival prospects and low fecundity. They can also produce offspring with reduced survival and reproductive success. We tested the effect of parental age on the performance of descendants in the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus, an intestinal parasite of rodents. We found that offspring of senescing worms had reduced within-host survival and reduced egg shedding over the first month post-infection compared with offspring produced by young parents. These results suggest that declining offspring...

Data from: Offspring development and life-history variation in a water flea depends upon clone-specific integration of genetic, non-genetic and environmental cues

Ewan Harney, Steve Paterson & Stewart J. Plaistow
1. Theory predicts that offspring developmental strategies involve the integration of genetic, non-genetic and environmental ‘cues’. But it is unclear how cue integration is achieved during development, and whether this pattern is general or genotype-specific. 2. In order to test this, we manipulated the maternal and offspring environments of three genetically distinct clones of the water flea Daphnia magna taken from different populations. We then quantified the effect that the genotype, maternal environment and the...

Data from: The relationship between plumage colouration, problem-solving and learning performance in great tits Parus major

Laure Cauchard, Stéphanie M. Doucet, Neeltje J. Boogert, Bernard Angers & Blandine Doligez
Recent studies suggest that individuals with better problem-solving and/or learning performance have greater reproductive success, and that individuals may thus benefit from choosing mates based on these performances. However, directly assessing these performances in candidate mates could be difficult. Instead, the use of indirect cues related to problem-solving and/or learning performance, such as condition-dependent phenotypic traits, might be favored. We investigated whether problem-solving and learning performance on a novel non-foraging task correlated with sexually selected...

Data from: Shared evolutionary origin of MHC polymorphism in sympatric lemurs

Eva Kaesler, Peter M. Kappeler, Markus Brameier, Janina Demeler, Cornelia Kraus, Josué H. Rakotoniaina, Anni M. Hämäläinen & Elise Huchard
Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) play a central role in adaptive immune responses of vertebrates. They exhibit remarkable polymorphism, often crossing species boundaries with similar alleles or allelic motifs shared across species. This pattern may reflect parallel parasite-mediated selective pressures, either favouring the long maintenance of ancestral MHC allelic lineages across successive speciation events by balancing selection (‘trans-species polymorphism’), or alternatively favouring the independent emergence of functionally similar alleles post-speciation via convergent evolution....

Data from: Multicontinental community phylogenetics of avian mixed-species flocks reveal the role of the stability of associations and of kleptoparasitism

Guillaume Péron
If understood as a way to forage socially without incurring intra-specific competition for mates or other resources, mixed-species foraging flocks are predicted to be composed of functionally similar species. In the most intensively studied mixed-species foraging system, understory forest birds, relevant functional traits are however extremely difficult to measure and best replaced by phylogenetic relatedness. A multicontinental analysis of flock phylogenetic structure revealed departures from the expected phylogenetic clustering. Long-lasting associations (> one day) were...

Data from: A nonrandom subset of olfactory genes is associated with host preference in the fruit fly Drosophila orena

Aaron A. Comeault, Antonio Serrato-Capuchina, David A. Turissini, Patrick J. McLaughlin, Jean R. David & Daniel R. Matute
Specialization onto different host plants has been hypothesized to be a major driver of diversification in insects, and traits controlling olfaction have been shown to play a fundamental role in host preferences. A diverse set of olfactory genes control olfactory traits in insects, and it remains unclear whether specialization onto different hosts is likely to involve a nonrandom subset of these genes. Here, we test the role of olfactory genes in a novel case of...

Data from: Spontaneous nongenetic variation of group size creates cheater-free groups of social microbes

Michaela Amherd, Gregory J. Velicer & Olaya Rendueles
In social organisms, cheaters that gain a fitness advantage by defecting from the costs of cooperation reduce the average level of cooperation in a population. Such “cheating load” can be severe enough to cause local extinction events when cooperation is necessary for survival, but can also mediate group-level selection against cheaters across spatially structured groups that vary in cheater frequency. In cheater-laden populations, such variation could be generated by the formation of new homogeneous groups...

Data from: Mapping and explaining wolf recolonization in France using dynamic occupancy models and opportunistic data

Julie Louvrier, Christophe Duchamp, Valentin Lauret, Eric Marboutin, Sarah Cubaynes, Rémi Choquet, Christian Miquel & Olivier Gimenez
While large carnivores are recovering in Europe, assessing their distributions can help to predict and mitigate conflicts with human activities. Because they are highly mobile, elusive and live at very low density, modeling their distributions presents several challenges due to i) their imperfect detectability, ii) their dynamic ranges over time and iii) their monitoring at large scales consisting mainly of opportunistic data without a formal measure of the sampling effort. Here, we focused on wolves...

Data from: Interpreting ELISA analyses from wild animal samples: some recurrent issues and solutions

Romain Garnier, Raül Ramos, Ana Sanz-Aguilar, Maud Poisbleau, Henri Weimerskirch, Sarah Burthe, Jeremy Tornos & Thierry Boulinier
1. Many studies in disease and immunological ecology rely on the use of assays that quantify the amount of specific antibodies (immunoglobulin) in samples. Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assays (ELISAs) are increasingly used in ecology due to their availability for a broad array of antigens and the limited amount of sampling material they require. Two recurrent methodological issues are nevertheless faced by researchers: (i) the limited availability of immunological assays and reagents developed for non-model species,...

Data from: Tillage and herbicide reduction mitigate the gap between conventional and organic farming effects on foraging activity of insectivorous bats

Kévin Barré, Isabelle Le Viol, Romain Julliard, François Chiron & Christian Kerbiriou
The increased use of pesticides and tillage intensification is known to negatively affect biodiversity. Changes in these agricultural practices such as herbicide and tillage reduction have variable effects among taxa, especially at the top of the trophic network including insectivorous bats. Very few studies compared the effects of agricultural practices on such taxa, and overall, only as a comparison of conventional versus organic farming without accurately accounting for underlying practices, especially in conventional where many...

Data from: Modelling unbiased dispersal kernels over continuous space by accounting for spatial heterogeneity in marking and observation efforts

Joël Chadoeuf, Alexandre Millon, Jean-Luc Bourrioux, Thierry Printemps, Benoit Van Hecke, Vincent Lecoustre & Vincent Bretagnolle
1. Although a key demographic trait determining the spatial dynamics of wild populations, dispersal is notoriously difficult to estimate in the field. Indeed, dispersal distances obtained from the monitoring of marked individuals typically lead to biased estimations of dispersal kernels as a consequence of i) restricted spatial scale of the study areas compared to species potential dispersal and ii) heterogeneity in marking and observation efforts and therfore in detection probability across space. 2. Here we...

Data from: Higher iridescent-to-pigment optical effect in flowers facilitates learning, memory and generalization in foraging bumblebees

Géraud De Premorel, Martin Giurfa, Christine Andraud & Doris Gomez
Iridescence—change of colour with changes in the angle of viewor of illumination— is widespread in the living world but its functions remain poorly understood. The presence of iridescence has been suggested in flowers where diffraction gratings generate iridescent colours. Such colours have been suggested to serve plant–pollinator communication. Here we tested whether a higher iridescence relative to corolla pigmentation would facilitate discrimination, learning and retention of iridescent visual targets. We conditioned bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) to...

Data from: A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Christopher Stephen Bird, Ana Veríssimo, Sarah Magozzi, Kátya G. Abrantes, Alex Aguilar, Hassan Al-Reasi, Adam Barnett, Dana M. Bethea, Gérard Biais, Asuncion Borrell, Marc Bouchoucha, Mariah Boyle, Edward J. Brooks, Juerg Brunnschweiler, Paco Bustamante, Aaron Carlisle, Diana Catarino, Stéphane Caut, Yves Cherel, Tiphaine Chouvelon, Diana Churchill, Javier Ciancio, Julien Claes, Ana Colaço, Dean L. Courtney … & Clive N. Trueman
Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits...

Data from: Do cryptic species matter in macroecology? Sequencing European groundwater crustaceans yields smaller ranges but does not challenge biodiversity determinants

David Eme, Maja Zagmajster, Teo Delić, Cene Fiser, Jean-François Flot, Lara Konecny-Dupré, Snaebjorn Palsson, Fabio Stoch, Valerija Zakšek, Christophe J. Douady & Florian Malard
Ecologists increasingly rely on molecular delimitation methods (MMs) to identify species boundaries, thereby potentially increasing the number of putative species because of the presence of morphologically cryptic species. It has been argued that cryptic species could challenge our understanding of what determine large-scale biodiversity patterns which have traditionally been documented from morphology alone. Here, we used morphology and three MMs to derive four different sets of putative species among the European groundwater crustaceans. Then, we...

Data from: Lack of evidence for selection favouring MHC haplotypes that combine high functional diversity

Arnaud Gaigher, Alexandre Roulin, Walid H. Gharib, Pierre Taberlet, Reto Burri & Luca Fumagalli
High rates of gene duplication and the highest levels of functional allelic diversity in vertebrate genomes are the main hallmarks of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), a multigene family with a primordial role in pathogen recognition. The usual tight linkage among MHC gene duplicates may provide an opportunity for the evolution of haplotypes that associate functionally divergent alleles and thus grant the transmission of optimal levels of diversity to coming generations. Even though such associations...

Data from: Joint evolution of differential seed dispersal and self-fertilization

Ryosuke Iritani, Pierre-Olivier Cheptou & P.-O. Cheptou
Differential seed dispersal, in which selfed and outcrossed seeds possess different dispersal propensities, represents a potentially important individual-level association. A variety of traits can mediate differential seed dispersal, including inflorescence and seed size variation. However, how natural selection shapes such associations is poorly known. Here, we developed theoretical models for the evolution of mating system and differential seed dispersal in metapopulations, incorporating heterogeneous pollination, dispersal cost, cost of outcrossing, and environment-dependent inbreeding depression. We considered...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    112

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    112

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    112
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    6
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    5
  • Paul Sabatier University
    5
  • University of Paris-Sud
    4
  • University of Montpellier
    4
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    3
  • University of Toulouse
    3
  • Aarhus University
    3
  • University of Lyon System
    3