112 Works

Data from: Spontaneous nongenetic variation of group size creates cheater-free groups of social microbes

Michaela Amherd, Gregory J. Velicer & Olaya Rendueles
In social organisms, cheaters that gain a fitness advantage by defecting from the costs of cooperation reduce the average level of cooperation in a population. Such “cheating load” can be severe enough to cause local extinction events when cooperation is necessary for survival, but can also mediate group-level selection against cheaters across spatially structured groups that vary in cheater frequency. In cheater-laden populations, such variation could be generated by the formation of new homogeneous groups...

Data from: Multicontinental community phylogenetics of avian mixed-species flocks reveal the role of the stability of associations and of kleptoparasitism

Guillaume Péron
If understood as a way to forage socially without incurring intra-specific competition for mates or other resources, mixed-species foraging flocks are predicted to be composed of functionally similar species. In the most intensively studied mixed-species foraging system, understory forest birds, relevant functional traits are however extremely difficult to measure and best replaced by phylogenetic relatedness. A multicontinental analysis of flock phylogenetic structure revealed departures from the expected phylogenetic clustering. Long-lasting associations (> one day) were...

Data from: Phylogenetically informed spatial planning is required to conserve the mammalian tree of life

Dan F. Rosauer, Laura J. Pollock, Simon Linke & Walter Jetz
In the face of the current extinction crisis and severely limited conservation resources, safeguarding the tree of life is increasingly recognized as a high priority. We conducted a first systematic global assessment of the conservation of phylogenetic diversity (PD) that uses realistic area targets and highlights the key areas for conservation of the mammalian tree of life. Our approach offers a substantially more effective conservation solution than one focused on species. In many locations, priorities...

Data from: Generalized bootstrap supports for phylogenetic analyses of protein sequences incorporating alignment uncertainty

Maria Chatzou, Evan Wade Floden, Paolo Di Tommaso, Olivier Gascuel & Cedric Notredame
Phylogenetic reconstructions are essential in genomics data analyses and depend on accurate multiple sequence alignment (MSA) models. We show that all currently available large-scale progressive multiple alignment methods are numerically unstable when dealing with amino-acid sequences. They produce significantly different output when changing sequence input order. We used the HOMFAM protein sequences dataset to show that on datasets larger than 100 sequences, this instability affects on average 21.5% of the aligned residues. The resulting Maximum...

Data from: Selection on skewed characters and the paradox of stasis

Suzanne Bonamour, Céline Teplitsky, Anne Charmantier, Pierre-André Crochet & Luis-Miguel Chevin
Observed phenotypic responses to selection in the wild often differ from predictions based on measurements of selection and genetic variance. An overlooked hypothesis to explain this paradox of stasis is that a skewed phenotypic distribution affects natural selection and evolution. We show through mathematical modelling that, when a trait selected for an optimum phenotype has a skewed distribution, directional selection is detected even at evolutionary equilibrium, where it causes no change in the mean phenotype....

Data from: Morphological integration in the appendicular skeleton of two domestic taxa: the horse and donkey

Pauline Hanot, Anthony Herrel, Claude Guintard & Raphaël Cornette
Organisms are organized into suites of anatomical structures that typically covary when developmentally or functionally related, and this morphological integration plays a determinant role in evolutionary processes. Artificial selection on domestic species causes strong morphological changes over short time spans, frequently resulting in a wide and exaggerated phenotypic diversity. This raises the question of whether integration constrains the morphological diversification of domestic species and how natural and artificial selection may impact integration patterns. Here, we...

Data from: Clonal structure through space and time: high stability in the holothurian Stichopus chloronotus (Echinodermata)

Agathe Pirog, Pauline Gélin, Alexandre Bédier, Stephane Georget, Gregoire Bianchetti, Patrick Frouin & Helene Magalon
Sea cucumbers are increasingly exploited for human consumption and for their curative properties, and many wild populations are now depleted or in danger of extinction. While aquaculture is seen as an alternative to fisheries and as a mean to restore wild populations, more knowledge is needed on their reproductive strategies to render this practice efficient, notably for fissiparous holothurians, which are some of the mobile animals able of asexual reproduction by transverse fission. Little information...

Data from: Immune priming specificity within and across generations reveals the range of pathogens affecting evolution of immunity in an insect

Julien Dhinaut, Manon Chogne & Yannick Moret
1. Many organisms can improve their immune response as a function of their immunological experience or that of their parents. This phenomenon, called immune priming, has likely evolved from repetitive challenges by the same pathogens during the host lifetime or across generation. 2. All pathogens may not expose host to the same probability of re-infection and immune priming is expected to evolve from pathogens exposing the host to the greatest probability of re-infection. Under this...

Data from: The palaeogenetics of cat dispersal in the ancient world

Claudio Ottoni, Wim Van Neer, Bea De Cupere, Julien Daligault, Silvia Guimaraes, Joris Peters, Nikolai Spassov, Mary E. Prendergast, Nicole Boivin, Arturo Morales-Muñiz, Adrian Bălăşescu, Cornelia Becker, Norbert Benecke, Adina Boroneant, Hijlke Buitenhuis, Jwana Chahoud, Alison Crowther, Laura Llorente, Nina Manaseryan, Hervé Monchot, Vedat Onart, Marta Osypińska, Olivier Putelat, Eréndira M. Quintana Morales, Jacqueline Studer … & Eva-Maria Geigl
The cat has long been important to human societies as a pest-control agent, object of symbolic value and companion animal, but little is known about its domestication process and early anthropogenic dispersal. Here we show, using ancient DNA analysis of geographically and temporally widespread archaeological cat remains, that both the Near Eastern and Egyptian populations of Felis silvestris lybica contributed to the gene pool of the domestic cat at different historical times. While the cat’s...

Data from: Habitat specialization and climate affect arthropod fitness: a comparison of generalist vs. specialist spider species in Arctic and temperate biomes

Camille Ameline, Charlène Puzin, Joseph J. Bowden, Kevin Lambeets, Philippe Vernon & Julien Pétillon
Life history trade-offs are a key notion in evolutionary biology, notably for understanding how selection shapes the diversity of traits among species. Despite the frequent study of such trade-offs, few studies synchronously investigate the effects of multiple factors, such as niche specialization and adaptation to harsh environments. We compared reproduction (fecundity and egg quality) in two sympatric couples (one habitat generalist and one specialist) of congeneric wolf spider species, in both Arctic and temperate habitats....

Data from: Higher iridescent-to-pigment optical effect in flowers facilitates learning, memory and generalization in foraging bumblebees

Géraud De Premorel, Martin Giurfa, Christine Andraud & Doris Gomez
Iridescence—change of colour with changes in the angle of viewor of illumination— is widespread in the living world but its functions remain poorly understood. The presence of iridescence has been suggested in flowers where diffraction gratings generate iridescent colours. Such colours have been suggested to serve plant–pollinator communication. Here we tested whether a higher iridescence relative to corolla pigmentation would facilitate discrimination, learning and retention of iridescent visual targets. We conditioned bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) to...

Data from: Offspring development and life-history variation in a water flea depends upon clone-specific integration of genetic, non-genetic and environmental cues

Ewan Harney, Steve Paterson & Stewart J. Plaistow
1. Theory predicts that offspring developmental strategies involve the integration of genetic, non-genetic and environmental ‘cues’. But it is unclear how cue integration is achieved during development, and whether this pattern is general or genotype-specific. 2. In order to test this, we manipulated the maternal and offspring environments of three genetically distinct clones of the water flea Daphnia magna taken from different populations. We then quantified the effect that the genotype, maternal environment and the...

Data from: Food availability modulates differences in parental effort between dispersing and philopatric birds

Charlotte Récapet, Pierre Bize & Blandine Doligez
Dispersal entails costs and might have to be traded off against other life-history traits. Dispersing and philopatric individuals may thus exhibit alternative life-history strategies. Importantly, these differences could also partly be modulated by environmental variation. Our previous results in a patchy population of a small passerine, the collared flycatcher, suggest that, as breeding density, a proxy of habitat quality, decreases, dispersing individuals invest less in reproduction but maintain a stable oxidative balance, whereas philopatric individuals...

Data from: Among-individual heterogeneity in maternal behaviour and physiology affects reproductive allocation and offspring life-history traits in the garter snake Thamnophis elegans

Eric J. Gangloff, Amanda M. Sparkman & Anne M. Bronikowski
Accumulating evidence suggests that within-individual plasticity of behavioural and physiological traits is limited, resulting in stable among-individual differences in these aspects of the phenotype. Furthermore, these traits often covary within individuals, resulting in a continuum of correlated phenotypic variation among individuals within populations and species. This heterogeneity, in turn, affects individual fitness and can have cross-generational effects. Patterns of trait covariation, among-individual differences, and subsequent fitness consequences have long been recognized in reptiles. Here, we...

Data from: The relationship between plumage colouration, problem-solving and learning performance in great tits Parus major

Laure Cauchard, Stéphanie M. Doucet, Neeltje J. Boogert, Bernard Angers & Blandine Doligez
Recent studies suggest that individuals with better problem-solving and/or learning performance have greater reproductive success, and that individuals may thus benefit from choosing mates based on these performances. However, directly assessing these performances in candidate mates could be difficult. Instead, the use of indirect cues related to problem-solving and/or learning performance, such as condition-dependent phenotypic traits, might be favored. We investigated whether problem-solving and learning performance on a novel non-foraging task correlated with sexually selected...

Data from: Wintering areas predict age-related breeding phenology in a migratory passerine bird

Cosme López-Calderón, Keith A. Hobson, Alfonso Marzal, Javier Balbontín, Marivel Reviriego, Sergio Magallanes, Luz García-Longoria, Florentino De Lope & Anders P. Møller
Understanding connections between breeding, stopover and wintering grounds for long-distance migratory birds can provide important insight into factors influencing demography and the strength of carry-over effects among various periods of the annual cycle. Using previously described, multi-isotope (δ13C, δ15N, δ2H) feather isoscapes for Africa, we identified the most probable wintering areas for house martins (Delichon urbica) breeding at Badajoz in southwestern Spain. We identified two most-probable wintering areas differing in latitude in West Africa. We...

Data from: Shared evolutionary origin of MHC polymorphism in sympatric lemurs

Eva Kaesler, Peter M. Kappeler, Markus Brameier, Janina Demeler, Cornelia Kraus, Josué H. Rakotoniaina, Anni M. Hämäläinen & Elise Huchard
Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) play a central role in adaptive immune responses of vertebrates. They exhibit remarkable polymorphism, often crossing species boundaries with similar alleles or allelic motifs shared across species. This pattern may reflect parallel parasite-mediated selective pressures, either favouring the long maintenance of ancestral MHC allelic lineages across successive speciation events by balancing selection (‘trans-species polymorphism’), or alternatively favouring the independent emergence of functionally similar alleles post-speciation via convergent evolution....

Data from: Cooperative defence operates by social modulation of biogenic amine levels in the honeybee brain

Morgane Nouvian, Souvik Mandal, Charlène Jamme, Charles Claudianos, Patrizia D'Ettorre, Judith Reinhard, Andrew B. Barron & Martin Giurfa
The defence of a society often requires that some specialized members coordinate to repel a threat at personal risk. This is especially true for honeybee guards, which defend the hive and may sacrifice their lives upon stinging. Central to this cooperative defensive response is the sting alarm pheromone, which has isoamyl acetate (IAA) as its main component. Although this defensive behaviour has been well described, the neural mechanisms triggered by IAA to coordinate stinging have...

Data from: Maternal oxidative stress and reproduction: testing the constraint, cost and shielding hypotheses in a wild mammal

Vincent A. Viblanc, Quentin Schull, Jeffrey D. Roth, Juliette Rabdeau, Claire Saraux, Pierre Uhlrich, François Criscuolo & F. Stephen Dobson
1. Oxidative stress has been proposed as a central causal mechanism underlying the life history trade-off between current and future reproduction and survival in wild animals. 2. Whereas mixed evidence suggests that maternal oxidative stress may act both as a constraint and a cost to reproduction, some studies have reported a lack of association between reproduction and maternal oxidative stress. 3. The oxidative shielding hypothesis offers an alternative explanation, suggesting that mothers may pre-emptively mitigate...

Data from: Lineages of Silene nutans developed rapid, strong, asymmetric postzygotic reproductive isolation in allopatry

Helene Martin, Pascal Touzet, Mathilde Dufay, Cécile Godé, Eric Schmitt, Emna Lahiani, Lynda F. Delph & Fabienne Van Rossum
Reproductive isolation can rise either as a consequence of genomic divergence in allopatry or as a byproduct of divergent selection in parapatry. To determine whether reproductive isolation in gynodioecious Silene nutans results from allopatric divergence or from ecological adaptation following secondary contact, we investigated the pattern of postzygotic reproductive isolation and hybridization in natural populations using two phylogeographic lineages, western (W1) and eastern (E1). Experimental crosses between the lineages identified strong, asymmetric postzygotic isolation between...

Data from: Leaf carbon and oxygen isotopes are coordinated with the leaf economics spectrum in Mediterranean rangeland species

Iván Prieto, José I. Querejeta, Jules Segrestin, Florence Volaire & Catherine Roumet
The leaf economics spectrum (LES) describes covariation of traits relevant to carbon and nutrient economics across plant species, but much less is known about the relationship between the LES and leaf water economy. We propose an approach combining the measurement of two leaf traits related to water use economy, leaf carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopic composition, and the measurement of leaf morphological and nutrient traits to investigate the link between leaf carbon and nutrient...

Data from: Scale dependence of the diversity–stability relationship in a temperate grassland

Yunhai Zhang, Nianpeng He, Michel Loreau, Qingmin Pan & Xingguo Han
1. A positive relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem stability has been reported in many ecosystems; however, it has yet to be determined whether and how spatial scale affects this relationship. Here, for the first time, we assessed the effects of alpha, beta and gamma diversity on ecosystem stability and the scale dependence of the slope of the diversity–stability relationship. 2. By employing a long-term (33 years) dataset from a temperate grassland, northern China, we calculated...

Data from: Personality, immune response and reproductive success: an appraisal of the pace-of-life syndrome hypothesis

Karine Monceau, Francois-Xavier Dechaume-Moncharmont, Jerome Moreau, Camille Lucas, Rémi Capoduro, Sébastien Motreuil & Yannick Moret
The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis is an extended concept of the life-history theory that includes behavioural traits. The studies challenging the POLS hypothesis often focus on the relationships between a single personality trait and a physiological and/or life-history trait. While pathogens represent a major selective pressure, few studies have been interested in testing relationships between behavioural syndrome, and several fitness components including immunity. The aim of this study was to address this question in the...

Data from: Cultural influence of social information use in pedestrian road-crossing behaviours

Marie Pelé, Caroline Bellut, Elise Debergue, Charlotte Gauvin, Anne Jeanneret, Thibault Leclere, Lucie Nicolas, Florence Pontier, Diorne Zausa & Cedric Sueur
Social information use is common in a wide range of group-living animals, notably in humans. The role it plays in decision-making could be a key to understanding how social groups make collective decisions. The observation of road-crossing behaviours in the presence of other individuals is an ideal means to study the influence of social information on decision-making. This study investigated the influence of culture on social information used by pedestrians in a potentially dangerous scenario,...

Data from: Joint evolution of differential seed dispersal and self-fertilization

Ryosuke Iritani, Pierre-Olivier Cheptou & P.-O. Cheptou
Differential seed dispersal, in which selfed and outcrossed seeds possess different dispersal propensities, represents a potentially important individual-level association. A variety of traits can mediate differential seed dispersal, including inflorescence and seed size variation. However, how natural selection shapes such associations is poorly known. Here, we developed theoretical models for the evolution of mating system and differential seed dispersal in metapopulations, incorporating heterogeneous pollination, dispersal cost, cost of outcrossing, and environment-dependent inbreeding depression. We considered...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    112

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    112

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    112
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    6
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    5
  • Paul Sabatier University
    5
  • University of Paris-Sud
    4
  • University of Montpellier
    4
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    3
  • University of Toulouse
    3
  • Aarhus University
    3
  • University of Lyon System
    3