112 Works

Data from: Phenotypic shift in Wolbachia virulence towards its native host across serial horizontal passages

Winka Le Clec'h, Jessica Dittmer, Maryline Raimond, Didier Bouchon & Mathieu Sicard
Vertical transmission mode is predicted to decrease the virulence of symbionts. However, Wolbachia, a widespread vertically transmitted endosymbiont, exhibits both negative and beneficial effects on arthropod fitness. This ‘Jekyll and Hyde’ behaviour, as well as its ability to live transiently outside host cells and to establish new infections via horizontal transmission, may reflect the capacity of Wolbachia to exhibit various phenotypes depending on the prevailing environmental constraints. To study the ability of Wolbachia to readily...

Data from: Unexpected collective larval dispersal but little support for sweepstakes reproductive success in the highly dispersive brooding mollusk Crepidula fornicata

Florentine Riquet, Thierry Comtet, Thomas Broquet & Frederique Viard
In many marine invertebrates, long-distance dispersal is achieved during an extended pelagic larval phase. Although such dispersal should result in high gene flow over broad spatial scales, fine-scale genetic structure has often been reported, a pattern attributed to interfamilial variance in reproductive success and limited homogenization during dispersal. To examine this hypothesis, the genetic diversity of dispersing larvae must be compared with the post-dispersal stages, i.e. benthic recruits and adults. Such data remain however scarce...

Data from: Invest more and die faster: the life history of a parasite on intensive farms

Adele Mennerat, Mathias Stølen Ugelvik, Camilla Håkonsrud Jensen & Arne Skorping
Organisms are expected to respond to alterations in their survival by evolutionary changes in their life history traits. As agriculture and aquaculture have become increasingly intensive in the past decades, there has been growing interest in their evolutionary effects on the life histories of agri- and aquacultural pests, parasites and pathogens. In this study we used salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) to explore how modern farming might have affected life history evolution in parasites. We infected...

Data from: Lack of evidence for selection favouring MHC haplotypes that combine high functional diversity

Arnaud Gaigher, Alexandre Roulin, Walid H. Gharib, Pierre Taberlet, Reto Burri & Luca Fumagalli
High rates of gene duplication and the highest levels of functional allelic diversity in vertebrate genomes are the main hallmarks of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), a multigene family with a primordial role in pathogen recognition. The usual tight linkage among MHC gene duplicates may provide an opportunity for the evolution of haplotypes that associate functionally divergent alleles and thus grant the transmission of optimal levels of diversity to coming generations. Even though such associations...

Data from: Disentangling competitive versus climatic drivers of tropical forest mortality

Michiel Pillet, Emilie Joetzjer, Camille Belmin, Jérôme Chave, Philippe Ciais, Aurélie Dourdain, Margaret Evans, Bruno Hérault, Sebastiaan Luyssaert & Benjamin Poulter
1. Tropical forest mortality is controlled by biotic and abiotic processes, but how these processes interact to determine forest structure is not well understood. Using long-term demography data from permanent forest plots at the Paracou Tropical Forest Research Station in French Guiana, we analyzed the relative influence of competition and climate on tree mortality. We found that self-thinning is evident at the stand level, and is associated with clumped mortality at smaller scales (< 2...

Data from: PTEN controls glandular morphogenesis through a juxtamembrane β-Arrestin1/ARHGAP21 scaffolding complex

Arman Javadi, Ravi K. Deevi, Emma Evergren, Elodie Blondel-Tepaz, George S. Baillie, Mark G.H. Scott, Frederick Charles Campbell & Mark GH Scott
PTEN controls three-dimensional (3D) glandular morphogenesis by coupling juxtamembrane signalling to mitotic spindle machinery. While molecular mechanisms remain unclear, PTEN interacts through its C2 membrane-binding domain with the scaffold protein β-Arrestin1. Because β-Arrestin1 binds and suppresses the Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein ARHGAP21, we hypothesize that PTEN controls Cdc42-dependent morphogenic processes through a β-Arrestin1-ARHGAP21 complex. Here we show that PTEN knockdown (KD) impairs β-Arrestin1 membrane localization, β-Arrestin1-ARHGAP21 interactions, Cdc42 activation, mitotic spindle orientation and 3D glandular morphogenesis....

Data from: Reproductive success is energetically linked to foraging efficiency in Antarctic fur seals

Tiphaine Jeanniard-Du-Dot, Andrew W. Trites, John P.Y. Arnould, Christophe Guinet & John P. Y. Arnould
The efficiency with which individuals extract energy from their environment defines their survival and reproductive success, and thus their selective contribution to the population. Individuals that forage more efficiently (i.e., when energy gained exceeds energy expended) are likely to be more successful at raising viable offspring than individuals that forage less efficiently. Our goal was to test this prediction in large long-lived mammals under free-ranging conditions. To do so, we equipped 20 lactating Antarctic fur...

Data from: Do cryptic species matter in macroecology? Sequencing European groundwater crustaceans yields smaller ranges but does not challenge biodiversity determinants

David Eme, Maja Zagmajster, Teo Delić, Cene Fiser, Jean-François Flot, Lara Konecny-Dupré, Snaebjorn Palsson, Fabio Stoch, Valerija Zakšek, Christophe J. Douady & Florian Malard
Ecologists increasingly rely on molecular delimitation methods (MMs) to identify species boundaries, thereby potentially increasing the number of putative species because of the presence of morphologically cryptic species. It has been argued that cryptic species could challenge our understanding of what determine large-scale biodiversity patterns which have traditionally been documented from morphology alone. Here, we used morphology and three MMs to derive four different sets of putative species among the European groundwater crustaceans. Then, we...

Data from: A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Christopher Stephen Bird, Ana Veríssimo, Sarah Magozzi, Kátya G. Abrantes, Alex Aguilar, Hassan Al-Reasi, Adam Barnett, Dana M. Bethea, Gérard Biais, Asuncion Borrell, Marc Bouchoucha, Mariah Boyle, Edward J. Brooks, Juerg Brunnschweiler, Paco Bustamante, Aaron Carlisle, Diana Catarino, Stéphane Caut, Yves Cherel, Tiphaine Chouvelon, Diana Churchill, Javier Ciancio, Julien Claes, Ana Colaço, Dean L. Courtney … & Clive N. Trueman
Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits...

Data from: Fire coral clones demonstrate phenotypic plasticity among reef habitats

Caroline Eve Dubé, Emilie Boissin, Jeffrey A. Maynard & Serge Planes
Clonal populations are often characterized by reduced levels of genotypic diversity, which can translate into lower numbers of functional phenotypes, both of which impede adaptation. Study of partially clonal animals enables examination of the environmental settings under which clonal reproduction is favoured. Here, we gathered genotypic and phenotypic information from 3,651 georeferenced colonies of the fire coral Millepora platyphylla in five habitats with different hydrodynamic regimes in Moorea, French Polynesia. In the upper slope where...

Data from: A from-benchtop-to-desktop workflow for validating HTS data and for taxonomic identification in diet metabarcoding studies

Emmanuel Corse, Emese Meglécz, Gaït Archambaud, Morgane Ardisson, Jean-François Martin, Christelle Tougard, Rémi Chappaz & Vincent Dubut
The main objective of this work was to develop and validate a robust and reliable ‘from benchtop-to-desktop’ metabarcoding workflow to investigate the diet of invertebrate-eaters. We applied our workflow to fecal DNA samples of an invertebrate-eating fish species. A fragment of the COI gene was amplified by combining two minibarcoding primer sets to maximize the taxonomic coverage. Amplicons were sequenced by an Illumina MiSeq platform. We developed a filtering approach based on a series of...

Data from: Phylotranscriptomic consolidation of the jawed vertebrate timetree

Iker Irisarri, Denis Baurain, Henner Brinkmann, Frédéric Delsuc, Jean-Yves Sire, Alexander Kupfer, Jörn Petersen, Michael Jarek, Axel Meyer, Miguel Vences & Hervé Philippe
Phylogenomics is extremely powerful but introduces new challenges as no agreement exists on “standards” for data selection, curation and tree inference. We use jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata) as model to address these issues. Despite considerable efforts in resolving their evolutionary history and macroevolution, few studies have included a full phylogenetic diversity of gnathostomes and some relationships remain controversial. We tested a novel bioinformatic pipeline to assemble large and accurate phylogenomic datasets from RNA sequencing and find...

Data from: Connecting genomic patterns of local adaptation and niche suitability in teosintes

Jonas Aguirre-Liguori, Maud Tenaillon, Alejandra Vázquez-Lobo, Brandon Gaut, Juan Jaramillo-Correa, Salvador Montes-Hernandez, Valeria Souza, L. E. Eguiarte, J. P. Jaramillo-Correa & M. I. Tenaillon
The central-abundance hypothesis predicts that local adaptation is a function of the distance to the center of a species’ geographic range. To test this hypothesis, we gathered genomic diversity data from 49 populations, 646 individuals and 33,464 SNPs of two wild relatives of maize, the teosintes Zea mays ssp. parviglumis and Zea. mays. ssp. mexicana. We examined the association between the distance to their climatic and geographic centroids and the enrichment of SNPs bearing signals...

Data from: Nod factors potentiate auxin signaling for transcriptional regulation and lateral root formation in Medicago truncatula

Violaine Herrbach, Ximena Chirinos, David Rengel, Kokoévi Agbevenou, Rémy Vincent, Stephanie Pateyron, Stéphanie Huguet, Sandrine Balzergue, Asher Pasha, Nicholas Provart, Clare Gough & Sandra Bensmihen
Nodulation (Nod) factors (NFs) are symbiotic molecules produced by rhizobia that are essential for establishment of the rhizobium–legume endosymbiosis. Purified NFs can stimulate lateral root formation (LRF) in Medicago truncatula, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. Using a combination of reporter constructs, pharmacological and genetic approaches, we show that NFs act on early steps of LRF in M. truncatula, independently of the ethylene signaling pathway and of the cytokinin receptor MtCRE1, but...

Data from: Projected distributions of Southern Ocean albatrosses, petrels and fisheries as a consequence of climatic change

Lucas Krüger, J. A. Ramos, J. C. Xavier, D. Grémillet, J. González-Solís, M. V. Petry, R. A. Phillips, R. M. Wanless & V. H. Paiva
Given the major ongoing influence of environmental change on the oceans, there is a need to understand and predict the future distributions of marine species in order to plan appropriate mitigation to conserve vulnerable species and ecosystems. In this study we use tracking data from seven large seabird species of the Southern Ocean (Black-browed Albatross Thalassarche melanophris, Grey-headed Albatross T. chrysostoma, Northern Giant Petrel Macronectes halli, Southern Giant Petrel M. giganteus, Tristan Albatross Diomedea dabbenena...

Data from: Riders in the sky (islands): using a mega-phylogenetic approach to understand plant species distribution and coexistence at the altitudinal limits of angiosperm plant life

Hannah E. Marx, Cédric Dentant, Julien Renaud, Romain Delunel, David C. Tank & Sébastien Lavergne
Aim: Plants occurring on high-alpine summits are generally expected to persist due to adaptations to extreme selective forces caused by the harshest climates where angiosperm life is known to thrive. We assessed the relative effects of this strong environmental filter and of other historical and stochastic factors driving plant community structure in very high-alpine conditions. Location: European Alps, Écrins National Park, France. Methods: Using species occurrence data collected from floristic surveys on 15 summits (2,791–4,102...

Data from: Impact of disease on the survival of three commercially fished species

John M. Hoenig, Maya L. Groner, Matthew W. Smith, Wolfgang K. Vogelbein, David M. Taylor, , John T. Swenarton, David T. Gauthier, Philip Sadler, Mark A. Matsche, Ashley N. Haines, Hamish J. Small, Roger Pradel, Rémi Choquet & Jeffrey D. Shields
Recent increases in emergent infectious diseases have raised concerns about the population stability of some marine species. The complexity and expense of studying diseases in marine systems often dictate that conservation and management decisions are made without quantitative data on population-level impacts of disease. Mark-recapture is a powerful, underutilized, tool for calculating impacts of disease on population size and structure, even in the absence of etiological information. We applied logistic regression models to mark-recapture data...

Data from: Patch dynamics and temporal dispersal partly shape annual plant communities in ephemeral habitat patches

Lucie Mahaut, Guillaume Fried & Sabrina Gaba
Most organisms in ephemeral habitat patches have resting stages which form a local species pool in response to temporal variations in the patch’s availability and suitability. Temporal dispersal from the local species pool may, therefore, be an important process shaping the community assembly, particularly soon after patch creation, and possibly interacting with environmental filtering. As the temporal variation of the environmental conditions has a major effect on the composition of the local species pool, we...

Data from: Multi-scale and antagonist selection on life-history traits in parasitoids: a community ecology perspective

Yannick Outreman, Thiago Oliveira Andrade, Philippe Louâpre, Liliane Krespi, Cyrille Violle & Joan Van Baaren
1) Life-history traits within ecological communities can be influenced by regional environmental conditions (external filters) and community-wide density-dependent processes (internal filters). While traits in a regional context may converge to a narrow range of values because of environmental filtering, species belonging to a guild may present contrasting traits as a means of niche differentiation, allowing coexistence whilst exploiting the same resources. 2) To disentangle the role of external and internal filters on phenotypic diversity within...

Data from: High-throughput sequencing of transposable element insertions suggests adaptive evolution of the invasive Asian Tiger Mosquito towards temperate environments

Clément Goubert, Hélène Henri, Guillaume Minard, Claire Valiente Moro, Patrick Mavingui, Cristina Vieira & Matthieu Boulesteix
Invasive species represent unique opportunities to evaluate the role of local adaptation during colonization of new environments. Among these species, the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a threatening vector of several human viral diseases, including dengue and chikungunya, and raises concerns about the Zika fever. Its broad presence in both temperate and tropical environments has been considered the reflection of great “ecological plasticity.” However, no study has been conducted to assess the role of...

Data from: Evolutionary origins of teeth in jawed vertebrates: conflicting data from acanthothoracid dental plates (‘Placodermi’)

Moya Meredith Smith, Brett Clark, Daniel Goujet & Zerina Johanson
Placoderms (Devonian fossil fishes) are resolved phylogenetically to the base of jawed vertebrates and provide important evidence for evolutionary origins of teeth, particularly with respect to the Arthrodira. The arthrodires represent a derived group of placoderms; the dentition of other more primitive placoderms such as the acanthothoracids is less well known. Articulated acanthothoracid dental plates are rare; x-ray computed tomography of a single, unique specimen, along with 3D segmentation of bone, oral denticles and vascular...

Data from: Hidden survival heterogeneity of three common eider populations in response to climate fluctuations

Loreleï Guéry, Sébastien Descamps, Roger Pradel, Sveinn Are Hanssen, Kjell Einar Erikstad, Geir W. Gabrielsen, H. Grant Gilchrist & Joël Bêty
(1) Understanding how individuals and populations respond to fluctuations in climatic conditions is critical to explain and anticipate changes in ecological systems. Most such studies focus on climate impacts on single populations without considering inter- and intra-population heterogeneity. However, comparing geographically dispersed populations limits the risk of faulty generalizations and helps to improve ecological and demographic models. (2) We aimed to determine whether differences in migration tactics among and within populations would induce inter- or...

Data from: Direct transfer of learned behaviour via cell fusion in non-neural organisms

David Vogel & Audrey Dussutour
Cell fusion is a fundamental phenomenon observed in all eukaryotes. Cells can exchange resources such as molecules or organelles during fusion. In this paper, we ask whether a cell can also transfer an adaptive response to a fusion partner. We addressed this question in the unicellular slime mould Physarum polycephalum, in which cell–cell fusion is extremely common. Slime moulds are capable of habituation, a simple form of learning, when repeatedly exposed to an innocuous repellent,...

Data from: Fine nurse variations explain discrepancies in the stress-interaction relationship in alpine regions

Fabien Anthelme, Rosa I. Meneses, Nerida N. Huaman Valero, Paola Pozo & Olivier Dangles
Despite a large consensus on increasing facilitation among plants with increasing stress in alpine regions, a number of different outcomes of interaction have been observed, which impedes the generalisation of the ‘stress-gradient hypothesis’ (SGH). With the aim to reconcile the different viewpoints on the stress-interaction relationship in alpine environments we hypothesized that fine nurse variations within a single life form (cushion) may explain this pattern variability To test this hypothesis, we compared the magnitude of...

Data from: Assortative mating by colored ornaments in blue tits: space and time matter

Amélie Fargevieille, Arnaud Grégoire, Anne Charmantier, Maria Del Rey Granado & Claire Doutrelant
Assortative mating is a potential outcome of sexual selection and estimating its level is important to better understand local adaptation and underlying trait evolution. However, assortative mating studies frequently base their conclusions on small numbers of individuals sampled over short periods of time and limited spatial scales even though spatiotemporal variation is common. Here, we characterized assortative mating patterns over 10 years in four populations of the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus), a passerine bird. We...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    112

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    112

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    112
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    6
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    5
  • Paul Sabatier University
    5
  • University of Paris-Sud
    4
  • University of Montpellier
    4
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    3
  • University of Toulouse
    3
  • Aarhus University
    3
  • University of Lyon System
    3