199 Works

Data from: Matrix composition and patch edges influence plant-herbivore interactions in marine landscapes

Jordi F. Pagès, Alessandro Gera, Javier Romero & Teresa Alcoverro
The functioning of ecosystems can be strongly driven by landscape attributes. Despite its importance, however, our understanding of how landscape influences ecosystem function derives mostly from species richness and abundance patterns, with few studies assessing how these relate to actual functional rates. We examined the influence of landscape attributes on the rates of herbivory in seagrass meadows, where herbivory has been identified as a key process structuring these relatively simple systems. The study was conducted...

Data from: Medically important differences in snake venom composition are dictated by distinct postgenomic mechanisms

Nicholas R. Casewell, Simon C. Wagstaff, Wolfgang Wüster, Darren A. N. Cook, Fiona M. S. Bolton, Sarah I. King, Davinia Pla, Libia Sanz, Juan J. Calvete & Robert A. Harrison
Variation in venom composition is a ubiquitous phenomenon in snakes and occurs both interspecifically and intraspecifically. Venom variation can have severe outcomes for snakebite victims by rendering the specific antibodies found in antivenoms ineffective against heterologous toxins found in different venoms. The rapid evolutionary expansion of different toxin-encoding gene families in different snake lineages is widely perceived as the main cause of venom variation. However, this view is simplistic and disregards the understudied influence that...

Data from: Polyploidy and microsatellite variation in the relict tree Prunus lusitanica L.: how effective are refugia in preserving genotypic diversity of clonal taxa?

Carlos García-Verdugo, Juan Antonio Calleja, Pablo Vargas, Luis Silva, Orlanda Moreira & Fernando Pulido
Refugia are expected to preserve genetic variation of relict taxa, especially in polyploids, because high gene dosages could prevent genetic erosion in small isolated populations. However, other attributes linked to polyploidy, such as asexual reproduction, may strongly limit the levels of genetic variability in relict populations. Here, ploidy levels and patterns of genetic variation at nuclear microsatellite loci were analysed in Prunus lusitanica, a polyploid species with clonal reproduction that is considered a paradigmatic example...

Data from: Litter movement pathways across terrestrial-aquatic ecosystem boundaries affect litter colonization and decomposition in streams

Manuela Abelho & Enrique Descals
1. Streams and their riparian zones are connected by spatial flows of organic matter, and constitute a model example of a meta-ecosystem. Fluxes of leaf litter from the riparian zone to the stream are a major energy source in stream food webs. Leaf litter can enter the stream vertically, falling from the tree and into the stream, or laterally, washing into the stream after a period of exposure in the terrestrial ecosystem. The latter can...

Data from: Detection of tephra layers in Antarctic sediment cores with hyperspectral imaging

Ismael F. Aymerich, Marc Oliva, Santiago Giralt & Julio Martín-Herrero
Tephrochronology uses recognizable volcanic ash layers (from airborne pyroclastic deposits, or tephras) in geological strata to set unique time references for paleoenvironmental events across wide geographic areas. This involves the detection of tephra layers which sometimes are not evident to the naked eye, including the so-called cryptotephras. Tests that are expensive, time-consuming, and/or destructive are often required. Destructive testing for tephra layers of cores from difficult regions, such as Antarctica, which are useful sources of...

Data from: Bet-hedging as a mechanism for the evolution of polyandry, revisited

Yukio Yasui & Francisco Garcia-Gonzalez
Females that mate with multiple males (polyandry) may reduce the risk that their eggs are fertilized by a single unsuitable male. About 25 years ago it was hypothesized that bet-hedging could function as a mechanism favoring the evolution of polyandry, but this idea is controversial because theory indicates that bet-hedging via polyandry can compensate the costs of mating only in small populations. Nevertheless, populations are often spatially structured, and even in the absence of spatial...

Data from: Ontogenetic reduction in thermal tolerance is not alleviated by earlier developmental acclimation in Rana temporaria

Urtzi Enriquez-Urzelai, Martina Sacco, Antonio S. Palacio, Pol Pintanel, Miguel Tejedo & Alfredo G. Nicieza
Complex life-histories may promote the evolution of different strategies to allow optimal matching to the environmental conditions that organisms can encounter in contrasting environments. For ectothermic animals, we need to disentangle the role of stage-specific thermal tolerances and developmental acclimation to predict the effects of climate change on spatial distributions. However, the interplay between these mechanisms has been poorly explored. Here we study whether developmental larval acclimation to rearing temperatures affects the thermal tolerance of...

Data from: The interplay of landscape composition and configuration: new pathways to manage functional biodiversity and agro-ecosystem services across Europe

Emily A. Martin, Matteo Dainese, Yann Clough, András Báldi, Riccardo Bommarco, Vesna Gagic, Michael Garratt, Andrea Holzschuh, David Kleijn, Anikó Kovács-Hostyánszki, Lorenzo Marini, Simon G. Potts, Henrik G. Smith, Diab Al Hassan, Matthias Albrecht, Georg K. S. Andersson, Josep Asis, Stephanie Aviron, Mario Balzan, Laura Baños-Picón, Ignasi Bartomeus, Peter Batary, Françoise Burel, Berta Caballero-López, Elena D. Concepcion … & Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter
Managing agricultural landscapes to support biodiversity and ecosystem services is a key aim of a sustainable agriculture. However, how the spatial arrangement of crop fields and other habitats in landscapes impacts arthropods and their functions is poorly known. Synthesising data from 49 studies (1515 landscapes) across Europe, we examined effects of landscape composition (% habitats) and configuration (edge density) on arthropods in fields and their margins, pest control, pollination and yields. Configuration effects interacted with...

Data from: When one phenotype is not enough - divergent evolutionary trajectories govern venom variation in a widespread rattlesnake species

Giulia Zancolli, Juan J. Calvete, Michael D. Cardwell, Harry W. Greene, William K. Hayes, Matthew J. Hegarty, Hans-Werner Herrmann, Andrew T. Holycross, Dominic I. Lannutti, John F. Mulley, Libia Sanz, Zachary D. Travis, Joshua R. Whorley, Catharine E. Wüster & Wolfgang Wuster
Understanding the origin and maintenance of phenotypic variation, particularly across a continuous spatial distribution, represents a key challenge in evolutionary biology. For this, animal venoms represent ideal study systems: they are complex, variable, yet easily quantifiable molecular phenotypes with a clear function. Rattlesnakes display tremendous variation in their venom composition, mostly through strongly dichotomous venom strategies, which may even coexist within single species. Here, through dense, widespread population-level sampling of the Mojave rattlesnake, Crotalus scutulatus,...

Data from: Fitter frogs from polluted ponds: the complex impacts of human-altered environments

Steven P. Brady, Francisco J. Zamora-Camacho, Fredrik A.A. Eriksson, Debora Goedert, Mar Comas & Ryan Calsbeek
Human-modified habitats rarely yield outcomes that are aligned with conservation ideals. Landscapes that are subdivided by roads are no exception, precipitating negative impacts on populations due to fragmentation, pollution, and road kill. Although many populations in human modified habitats show evidence for local adaptation, rarely does environmental change yield outright benefits for populations of conservation interest. Contrary to expectations, we report surprising benefits experienced by amphibian populations breeding and dwelling in proximity to roads. We...

Data from: Sorption and desorption of bicyclopyrone on soils

Kurt Spokas, Bea Gamiz, Sharon Schneider, Kathleen Hall & Wenlin Chen
Bicyclopyrone is a herbicide that is targeted for the control of herbicide-resistant weeds. However, there is a lack of extensive data on its sorption and factors that control its sorption in the soil system. In this study, we evaluated a series of 25 different soils, with a variety of soil properties to assess if an empirical relationship could be developed to predict the sorption coefficient for bicyclopyrone. Overall, there were no statistically significant relationships observed...

Data from: The evolution of iris colour in relation to nocturnality in owls

Arianna Passarotto, Deseada Parejo, Angel Cruz‐Miralles & J. M. Aviles
Birds, due to their multiple colourful displays, constitute a classic paradigm for the study of colour evolution. Although avian eyes are remarkably coloured, the functional basis behind inter‐specific variability in iris colouration remains poorly understood. Owls are an ideal system to shed light on the role of ecology in promoting iris colour evolution as they show inter‐specific variation in iris colour and in niche specialization with some species being strictly nocturnal and others active during...

Data from: Detecting slow introgression of invasive alleles in an extensively restocked game bird

Ines Sanchez-Donoso, Jisca Huisman, Jorge Echegaray, Manel Puigcerver, José Domingo Rodríguez-Teijeiro, Frank Hailer & Carles Vilà
Interbreeding of two species in the wild implies introgression of alleles from one species into the other only when admixed individuals survive and successfully backcross with the parental species. Consequently, estimating the proportion of first generation hybrids in a population may not inform about the evolutionary impact of hybridization. Samples obtained over a long time span may offer a more accurate view of the spreading of introgressed alleles in a species’ gene pool. Common quail...

Data from: Deciphering the adjustment between environment and life history in annuals: lessons from a geographically-explicit approach in Arabidopsis thaliana

Esperanza Manzano-Piedras, Arnald Marcer, Carlos Alonso-Blanco & F. Xavier Picó
The role that different life-history traits may have in the process of adaptation caused by divergent selection can be assessed by using extensive collections of geographically-explicit populations. This is because adaptive phenotypic variation shifts gradually across space as a result of the geographic patterns of variation in environmental selective pressures. Hence, large-scale experiments are needed to identify relevant adaptive life-history traits as well as their relationships with putative selective agents. We conducted a field experiment...

Data from: Candidate gene analysis suggests untapped genetic complexity in melanin-based pigmentation in birds

Yann X. C. Bourgeois, Joris A. M. Bertrand, Boris Delahaie, Josselin Cornuault, Thomas Duval, Borja Milá & Christophe Thébaud
Studies on melanin-based color variation in a context of natural selection have provided a wealth of information on the link between phenotypic and genetic variation. Here, we evaluated associations between melanic plumage patterns and genetic polymorphism in the Réunion grey white-eye (Zosterops borbonicus), a species in which mutations on MC1R do not seem to play any role in explaining melanic variation. This species exhibits five plumage color variants that can be grouped into three color...

Data from: Tackling intraspecific genetic structure in distribution models better reflects species geographical range

Arnald Marcer, Belén Méndez-Vigo, Carlos Alonso-Blanco & F. Xavier Picó
Genetic diversity provides insight into heterogeneous demographic and adaptive history across organisms’ distribution ranges. For this reason, decomposing single species into genetic units may represent a powerful tool to better understand biogeographical patterns as well as improve predictions of the effects of GCC (global climate change) on biodiversity loss. Using 279 georeferenced Iberian accessions, we used classes of three intraspecific genetic units of the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana obtained from the genetic analyses of nuclear...

Data from: Extreme genetic structure in a social bird species despite high dispersal capacity

Francisco Morinha, José A. Dávila, Bastos Estela, João A. Cabral, Óscar Frías, José L. González, Paulo Travassos, Diogo Carvalho, Borja Milá & Guillermo Blanco
Social barriers have been shown to reduce gene flow and contribute to genetic structure among populations in species with high cognitive capacity and complex societies, such as cetaceans, apes and humans. In birds, high dispersal capacity is thought to prevent population divergence unless major geographic or habitat barriers induce isolation patterns by dispersal, colonization or adaptation limitation. We report that Iberian populations of the red-billed chough, a social, gregarious corvid with high dispersal capacity, show...

Data from: Are females in good condition better able to cope with costly males?

Maider Iglesias-Carrasco, Michael D. Jennions, Susanne R.K. Zajitschek & Megan L. Head
The costs of mating for a female might depend on both her phenotype and that of her mate. Sexually antagonistic male traits that negatively affect females are often condition-dependent, so a male’s rearing environment can affect the costs he imposes on his mate. Likewise, a female’s ability to resist male-imposed costs might be condition-dependent. We experimentally manipulated female and male body condition in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus by rearing larvae on a good or...

Effects of episodic nutrients enrichments on P-limited planktonic communities: Lake Redon ENEX 2013 experiment

Jordi Catalan, Marisol Felip, Pau Giménez-Grau, Aitziber Zufiaurre, Lluis Camarero & Sergi Pla-Rabés
Planktonic communities are naturally subjected to episodic nutrient enrichments that may stress or redress the imbalances in limiting nutrients. Human-enhanced atmospheric nitrogen deposition has caused profound N:P imbalance in many remote oligotrophic lakes in which phosphorus has largely become limiting. These lakes offer an opportunity to investigate the planktonic community response to nutrient fluctuations in P-limited conditions. The ENEX experiment in Lake Redon (Pyrenees), performed during August 2013, aimed to investigate the structural and stoichiometric...

Data from: Bypass of genetic constraints during mutator evolution to antibiotic resistance

Alejandro Couce, Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas, Jesús Blázquez, A. Rodriguez-Rojas & J. Blazquez
Genetic constraints can block many mutational pathways to optimal genotypes in real fitness landscapes, yet the extent to which this can limit evolution remains to be determined. Interestingly, mutator bacteria elevate only specific types of mutations, and therefore could be very sensitive to genetic constraints. Testing this possibility is not only clinically relevant, but can also inform about the general impact of genetic constraints in adaptation. Here, we evolved 576 populations of two mutator and...

Data from: Systems biology of tissue-specific response to Anaplasma phagocytophilum reveals differentiated apoptosis in the tick vector Ixodes scapularis

Nieves Ayllón, Margarita Villar, Ruth C. Galindo, Katherine M. Kocan, Radek Sima, Juan A. López, Jesús Vázquez, Pilar Alberdi, Alejandro Cabezas-Cruz, Petr Kopáček & José De La Fuente
Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging pathogen that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Infection with this zoonotic pathogen affects cell function in both vertebrate host and the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. Global tissue-specific response and apoptosis signaling pathways were characterized in I. scapularis nymphs and adult female midguts and salivary glands infected with A. phagocytophilum using a systems biology approach combining transcriptomics and proteomics. Apoptosis was selected for pathway-focused analysis due to its role in bacterial infection...

Data from: Host nest site choice depends on risk of cuckoo parasitism in magpie hosts

Mónica Expósito-Granados, Deseada Parejo, Juan Gabriel Martínez, Marta Precioso, Mercedes Molina-Morales & Jesús M. Avilés
Avian brood parasites impose large fitness costs on their hosts and, thus, brood parasitism has selected for an array of host defensive mechanisms to avoid them. So far most studies have focused on antiparasite defenses operating at the egg and chick stages and neglected defenses that may work prior to parasite egg deposition. Here, we experimentally explore the possibility that hosts, as part of a front-line defense, might minimize parasitism costs through informed nest site...

Data from: The relevance of gene flow in metapopulation dynamics of an oceanic island endemic, Olea europaea subsp guanchica

Carlos García-Verdugo, Alan D Forrest, Michael F Fay & Pablo Vargas
Theoretical and empirical studies suggest that geographical isolation and extinction-recolonization dynamics are two factors causing strong genetic structure in metapopulations. Here, we investigated the effect of population age structure and isolation by distance in the patterns of genetic diversity in a tree species (Olea europaea subsp. guanchica) sporadically affected by volcanic events across the Canarian archipelago. Genetic variation was assessed at six nuclear microsatellites (nDNA) and six chloroplast fragments (cpDNA) in nine subpopulations sampled on...

Data from: Major histocompatability complex variation in insular populations of the Egyptian vulture: inferences about the roles of genetic drift and selection

Rosa Agudo, Miguel Alcaide, Ciro Rico, Jesus Angel Lemus, Guillermo Blanco, Fernando Hiraldo & Jose Antonio Donázar
Insular populations have attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists because of their morphological and ecological peculiarities with respect to their mainland counterparts. Founder effects and genetic drift are known to distribute neutral genetic variability in these demes. However, elucidating whether these evolutionary forces have also shaped adaptive variation is crucial to evaluate the real impact of reduced genetic variation in small populations. Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) are classical examples of evolutionarily relevant...

Data from: Phylogenetic ecology of widespread uncultured clades of the Kingdom Euryarchaeota

Albert Barberán, Antoni Fernández-Guerra, Jean-Christophe Auguet, Pierre E Galand & Emilio O Casamayor
Despite its widespread distribution and high levels of phylogenetic diversity, microbes are poorly understood creatures. We applied a phylogenetic ecology approach in the Kingdom Euryarchaeota (Archaea) to gain insight into the environmental distribution and evolutionary history of one of the most ubiquitous and largely unknown microbial groups. We compiled 16S rRNA gene sequences from our own sequence libraries and public genetic databases for two of the most widespread mesophilic Euryarchaeota clades, Lake Dagow Sediment (LDS)...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    9
  • 2020
    9
  • 2019
    24
  • 2018
    25
  • 2017
    32
  • 2016
    24
  • 2015
    19
  • 2014
    23
  • 2013
    11
  • 2012
    10

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    199

Affiliations

  • Spanish National Research Council
    199
  • University of Barcelona
    21
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    10
  • Centre for Research on Ecology and Forestry Applications
    10
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    9
  • Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales
    6
  • University of Oviedo
    4
  • Ghent University
    4
  • Nature Conservation Foundation
    4
  • Harvard University
    4