123 Works

Data from: Variable effects of temperature on insect herbivory

Nathan P. Lemoine, Deron E. Burkepile & John D. Parker
Rising temperatures can influence the top-down control of plant biomass by increasing herbivore metabolic demands. Unfortunately, we know relatively little about the effects of temperature on herbivory rates for most insect herbivores in a given community. Evolutionary history, adaptation to local environments, and dietary factors may lead to variable thermal response curves across different species. Here we characterized the effect of temperature on herbivory rates for 21 herbivore-plant pairs, encompassing 14 herbivore and 12 plant...

Data from: Globally, functional traits are weak predictors of juvenile tree growth, and we do not know why

C. E. Timothy Paine, Lucy Amissah, Harald Auge, Christopher Baraloto, Martin Baruffol, Nils Bourland, Helge Bruelheide, Kasso Daïnou, Roland C. De Gouvenain, Jean-Louis Doucet, Susan Doust, Paul V. A. Fine, Claire Fortunel, Josephine Haase, Karen D. Holl, Hervé Jactel, Xuefei Li, Kaoru Kitajima, Julia Koricheva, Cristina Martínez-Garza, Christian Messier, Alain Paquette, Christopher Philipson, Daniel Piotto, Lourens Poorter … & Andy Hector
1. Plant functional traits, in particular specific leaf area (SLA), wood density and seed mass, are often good predictors of individual tree growth rates within communities. Individuals and species with high SLA, low wood density and small seeds tend to have faster growth rates. 2. If community-level relationships between traits and growth have general predictive value, then similar relationships should also be observed in analyses that integrate across taxa, biogeographic regions and environments. Such global...

Data from: Meek mothers with powerful daughters: effects of novel host environments and small trait differences on parasitoid competition

Gabriela Hamerlinck, Nathan P. Lemoine, Glen R. Hood, Karen C. Abbott & Andrew A. Forbes
Outcomes of competition may depend both on subtle differences in traits relevant to fitness and on how those traits are expressed in the context of the environment. Environmental effects on traits impacting population dynamics are often overlooked in studies of parasitic wasp (parasitoid) competition. Lineages of the parasitoid Diachasma alloeum (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) differ in relative ovipositor length (a trait affecting the proportion of hosts available for parasitism). Since the size of natal hosts affects the...

Data from: Distributions of irritative zones are related to individual alterations of resting-state networks in focal epilepsy

Yinchen Song, Basavaraju G. Sanganahalli, Fahmeed Hyder, Wei-Chiang Lin & Jorge J. Riera
Alterations in the connectivity patterns of the fMRI-based resting-state networks (RSNs) have been reported in several types of epilepsies. Evidence pointed out these alterations might be associated with the genesis and propagation of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). IEDs also evoke blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) responses, which have been used to delineate irritative zones during preoperative work-up. Therefore, one may expect a relationship between the topology of the IED-evoked BOLD response network and the altered spatial patterns...

Data from: The influence of host plant extrafloral nectaries on multitrophic interactions: an experimental investigation

Suzanne Koptur, Ian M. Jones & Jorge E. Peña
A field experiment was conducted with outplantings of the native perennial shrub Senna mexicana var. chapmanii in a semi-natural area adjacent to native pine rockland habitat in southern Florida. The presence of ants and the availability of extrafloral nectar were manipulated in a stratified random design. Insect communities were monitored and recorded over a period of six months with a view to addressing three main questions. Do ants provide biotic defense against key herbivores on...

Data from: Fire frequency drives habitat selection by a diverse herbivore guild impacting top–down control of plant communities in an African savanna

Deron E. Burkepile, Dave I. Thompson, Richard W. S. Fynn, Sally E. Koerner, Stephanie Eby, Navashni Govender, Nicole Hagenah, Nathan P. Lemoine, Katherine J. Matchett, Kevin R. Wilcox, Scott L. Collins, Kevin P. Kirkman, Alan K. Knapp & Melinda D. Smith
In areas with diverse herbivore communities such as African savannas, the frequency of disturbance by fire may alter the top–down role of different herbivore species on plant community dynamics. In a seven year experiment in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, we examined the habitat use of nine common herbivore species across annually burned, triennially burned and unburned areas. We also used two types of exclosures (plus open access controls) to examine the impacts of...

Data from: Worldwide exploration of the microbiome harbored by the cnidarian model, Exaiptasia pallida (Agassiz in Verrill, 1864) indicates a lack of bacterial association specificity at a lower taxonomic rank

Tanya Brown, Christopher Otero, Alejandro Grajales, Estefania Rodriguez & Mauricio Rodriguez-Lanetty
Examination of host-microbe interactions in early diverging metazoans, such as cnidarians, is of great interest from an evolutionary perspective to understand how host-microbial consortia have evolved. To address this problem, we analyzed whether the bacterial community associated with the cosmopolitan and model sea anemone Exaiptasia pallida shows specific patterns across worldwide populations ranging from the Caribbean Sea, and the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. By comparing sequences of the V1–V3 hypervariable regions of the bacterial 16S...

Data from: Carbon recovery dynamics following disturbance by selective logging in Amazonian forests

Camille Piponiot, Plinio Sist, Lucas Mazzei, Marielos Peña-Claros, Francis E. Putz, Ervan Rutishauser, Alexander Shenkin, Nataly Ascarrunz, Celso P. De Azevedo, Christopher Baraloto, Mabiane França, Marcelino Guedes, Eurídice N. Honorio Coronado, Marcus V. N. D'Oliveira, Ademir R. Ruschel, Katia E. Da Silva, Eleneide Doff Sotta, Cintia R. De Souza, Edson Vidal, Thales A. P. West, Bruno Hérault & Thales AP West
When 2 Mha of Amazonian forests are disturbed by selective logging each year, more than 90 Tg of carbon (C) is emitted to the atmosphere. Emissions are then counterbalanced by forest regrowth. With an original modelling approach, calibrated on a network of 133 permanent forest plots (175 ha total) across Amazonia, we link regional differences in climate, soil and initial biomass with survivors' and recruits' C fluxes to provide Amazon-wide predictions of post-logging C recovery....

Data from: A journey on plate tectonics sheds light on European crayfish phylogeography

Lucian Pârvulescu, Jorge L. Pérez-Moreno, Cristian Panaiotu, Lucian Drăguț, Anne Schrimpf, Ioana‐Diana Popovici, Claudia Zaharia, András Weiperth, Blanka Gál, Christoph D. Schubart & Heather Bracken-Grissom
Crayfish can be used as model organisms in phylogeographic and divergence time studies if reliable calibrations are available. This study presents a comprehensive investigation into the phylogeography of the European stone crayfish (Austropotamobius torrentium) and includes samples from previously unstudied sites. Two mitochondrial markers were used to reveal evolutionary relationships among haplogroups throughout the species’ distributional range and to estimate the divergence time by employing both substitution rates and geological calibration methods. Our haplotype network...

Data from: Indirect legacy effects of an extreme climactic event on a marine megafaunal community

Robert Nowicki, Michael Heithaus, Jordan Thomson, Derek Burkholder, Kirk Gastrich & Aaron Wirsing
While extreme climactic events (ECEs) are predicted to become more frequent, reliably predicting their impacts on consumers remains challenging– particularly for large consumers in marine environments. Many studies that do evaluate ECE effects focus primarily on direct effects, though indirect effects can be equally or more important. Here, we investigate the indirect impacts of the 2011 “Ningaloo Niño” marine heatwave ECE on a diverse megafauna community in Shark Bay, Western Australia. We use an 18...

Data from: Population structure, connectivity and demographic history of an apex marine predator, the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas

Agathe Pirog, Virginie Ravigné, Michaël Fontaine, Adrien Rieux, Aude Gilabert, Geremy Cliff, Eric Clua, Ryan Daly, Michael Heithaus, Jeremy Kiszka, Philip Matich, John Nevill, Amy Smoothey, Andrew Temple, Per Berggren, Sebastien Jaquemet & Hélène Magalon
Knowledge of population structure, connectivity and effective population size remains limited for many marine apex predators, including the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas. This large-bodied coastal shark is distributed worldwide in warm temperate and tropical waters, and uses estuaries and rivers as nurseries. As an apex predator, the bull shark likely plays a vital ecological role within marine food webs, but is at risk due to inshore habitat degradation and various fishing pressures. We investigated the...

Archive data for: Loss of predation risk from apex predators can exacerbate marine tropicalization caused by extreme climatic events

Robert Nowicki, Jordan Thomson, James Fourqurean, Aaron Wirsing & Michael Heithaus
1. Extreme climatic events (ECEs) and predator removal represent some of the most widespread stressors to ecosystems. Though species interactions can alter ecological effects of climate change (and vice versa), it is less understood whether, when, and how predator removal can interact with ECEs to exacerbate their effects. Understanding the circumstances under which such interactions might occur is critical because predator loss is widespread and ECEs can generate rapid phase shifts in ecosystems which can...

Datafile - In situ adaptation and ecological release facilitate the occupied niche expansion of an invasive Madagascan day gecko in Florida

Thomas Fieldsend, Nicolas Dubos, Kenneth Krysko, Christopher Raxworthy & Sparkle Malone
Aim To investigate whether the frequently advocated climate-matching species distribution modelling approach could predict the well-characterized colonization of Florida by the Madagascar giant day gecko Phelsuma grandis. Location Madagascar and Florida, USA. Methods To determine the climatic conditions associated with the native range of P. grandis, we used native-range presence-only records and Bioclim climatic data to build a Maxent species distribution model and projected the climatic thresholds of the native range onto Florida. We then...

Elemental inheritance evaluation for geochemical elements in soil of the Daliangshan, China

Zhen-Jie Zhang, Hong Liu & Yuan Ouyang
Table S1

Additional file 2 of Genome-wide identification of key enzyme-encoding genes and the catalytic roles of two 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase involved in flavonoid biosynthesis in Cannabis sativa L.

Xuewen Zhu, Yaolei Mi, Xiangxiao Meng, Yiming Zhang, Weiqiang Chen, Xue Cao, Huihua Wan, Wei Yang, Jun Li, Sifan Wang, Zhichao Xu, Atia Tul Wahab, Shilin Chen & Wei Sun
Additional file 2: Table S2. Quantitative primers of the selected enzyme-encoding genes of flavonoid metabolic pathway in C. sativa.

Data from: A phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia: an RNA-seq approach

Vanessa L. González, Sónia C. S. Andrade, Rüdiger Bieler, Timothy M. Collins, Casey W. Dunn, Paula M. Mikkelsen, John D. Taylor, Gonzalo Giribet & V. L. Gonzalez
Bivalves are an ancient and ubiquitous group of aquatic invertebrates with an estimated 10 000–20 000 living species. They are economically significant as a human food source, and ecologically important given their biomass and effects on communities. Their phylogenetic relationships have been studied for decades, and their unparalleled fossil record extends from the Cambrian to the Recent. Nevertheless, a robustly supported phylogeny of the deepest nodes, needed to fully exploit the bivalves as a model...

Data from: The emergence of the lobsters: phylogenetic relationships, morphological evolution and divergence time comparisons of an ancient group (Decapoda: Achelata, Astacidea, Glypheidea, Polychelida)

Heather D. Bracken-Grissom, Shane T. Ahyong, Richard D. Wilkinson, Rodney M. Felmann, Carrie E. Schweitzer, Jesse W. Breinholt, Matthew Bendall, Ferran Palero, Tin-Yam Chan, Darryl L. Felder, Rafael Robles, Ka-Hou Chu, Ling-Ming Tsang, Dohyup Kim, Joel W. Martin, Keith A. Crandall & Rodney M. Feldmann
Lobsters are a ubiquitous and economically important group of decapod crustaceans that includes the infraorders Polychelida, Glypheidea, Astacidea and Achelata. They include familiar forms such as the spiny, slipper, clawed lobsters and crayfish and unfamiliar forms such as the deep-sea and “living fossil” species. The high degree of morphological diversity among these infraorders has led to a dynamic classification and conflicting hypotheses of evolutionary relationships. In this study, we estimated phylogenetic relationships amongst the major...

Data from: Conserved genetic regions across angiosperms as tools to develop single copy nuclear markers in gymnosperms: an example using cycads

Dayana E. Salas-Leiva, Alan W. Meerow, Javier Francisco-Ortega, Michael Calonje, M. Patrick Griffith, Dennis W. Stevenson & Kyoko Nakamura
Several individuals of the Caribbean Zamia clade and other cycad genera were used to identify single copy nuclear genes for phylogeographic and phylogenetic studies in Cycadales. Two strategies were employed to select target loci: 1) a tblastX search of Arabidopsis conserved ortholog sequence (COS) set and, 2) a tblastX search of Arabidopsis-Populus-Vitis-Oryza Shared Single Copy genes (APVO SSC) against the EST Zamia databases in Genbank. From the first strategy, 30 loci were selected, and from...

Data from: Quantity over quality: light intensity, but not red/far-red ratio, affects extrafloral nectar production in Senna mexicana var. chapmanii

Ian M. Jones & Suzanne Koptur
Extrafloral nectar (EFN) mediates food-for-protection mutualisms between plants and insects and provides plants with a form of indirect defense against herbivory. Understanding sources of variation in EFN production is important because such variations affect the number and identity of insect visitors and the effectiveness of plant defense. Light represents a potentially crucial tool for regulating resource allocation to defense, as it not only contributes energy but may help plants to anticipate future conditions. Low red/far-red...

Data from: Morphological and molecular evolution and their consequences for conservation and taxonomy in the Le Conte's Thrasher (Toxostoma lecontei)

Hernán Vázquez-Miranda, Josie A. Griffin, Jay M. Sheppard, Jordan M. Herman, Octavio Rojas-Soto & Robert M. Zink
We evaluated geographic variation and subspecific taxonomy in the Le Conte's Thrasher (Toxostoma lecontei) by analyzing DNA sequences from 16 nuclear loci, one mitochondrial DNA locus, and four study skin characters, and compared these data sets with previously published data on plumage coloration and different mtDNA genes. Morphological support for the southernmost taxon, T. l. arenicola, is relatively weak: multivariate analyses of morphometrics or back coloration do not provide diagnostic support, although one color character...

Data from: Symbiotic immuno-suppression: is disease susceptibility the price of bleaching resistance?

Daniel G. Merselis, Diego Lirman & Mauricio Rodriguez-Lanetty
Accelerating anthropogenic climate change threatens to destroy coral reefs worldwide through the processes of bleaching and disease. These major contributors to coral mortality are both closely linked with thermal stress intensified by anthropogenic climate change. Disease outbreaks typically follow bleaching events, but a direct positive linkage between bleaching and disease has been debated. By tracking 152 individual coral ramets through the 2014 mass bleaching in a South Florida coral restoration nursery, we revealed a highly...

Data from: A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Christopher Stephen Bird, Ana Veríssimo, Sarah Magozzi, Kátya G. Abrantes, Alex Aguilar, Hassan Al-Reasi, Adam Barnett, Dana M. Bethea, Gérard Biais, Asuncion Borrell, Marc Bouchoucha, Mariah Boyle, Edward J. Brooks, Juerg Brunnschweiler, Paco Bustamante, Aaron Carlisle, Diana Catarino, Stéphane Caut, Yves Cherel, Tiphaine Chouvelon, Diana Churchill, Javier Ciancio, Julien Claes, Ana Colaço, Dean L. Courtney … & Clive N. Trueman
Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits...

Data from: The changing nature of collaboration in tropical ecology and conservation

Timothy M. Perez & J. Aaron Hogan
Collaboration can improve conservation initiatives through increases in article impact and by the building scientific understating required for conservation practice. We investigated temporal trends in collaboration in the tropical ecology and conservation literature by examining patterns of authorship for 2,271 articles published from 2000 to 2016 in Biotropica and the Journal of Tropical Ecology. Consistent with trends in other studies and scientific disciplines, we found that the mean number of authors per article increased from...

Data from: When is an herbivore not an herbivore? Detritivory facilitates herbivory in a freshwater system

Jessica L. Sanchez & Joel C. Trexler
1. Herbivory is thought to be an inefficient diet, but it independently evolved from carnivorous ancestors in many metazoan groups, suggesting that plant-eating is adaptive in some circumstances. In this study, we tested two hypotheses to explain the adaptive evolution of herbivory: 1) the Heterotroph Facilitation hypothesis (herbivory is adaptive because herbivores supplement their diets with heterotrophic microbes); and 2) the Lipid Allocation hypothesis (herbivory is adaptive because algae, which have high lipid concentrations, are...

Data from: Thermal quality influences habitat use of two anole species

Michelle E. Thompson, Brian J. Halstead & Maureen A. Donnelly
Regeneration of secondary forests on previously deforested or degraded land is one of the most dominant forms of land-use change in the tropics. However, the response of animal communities to forest regeneration is poorly understood. To evaluate support for thermal quality as a mechanism driving reptile species distributions during secondary forest succession, we measured operative temperatures and occupancy in three successional forest stages (pasture, secondary forest, and old growth forest) for two anole species common...

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