7 Works

Data from: Analysis of animal accelerometer data using hidden Markov models

Vianey Leos-Barajas, Theoni Photopoulou, Roland Langrock, Toby A. Patterson, Yuuki Y. Watanabe, Megan Murgatroyd & Yannis P. Papastamatiou
Use of accelerometers is now widespread within animal biologging as they provide a means of measuring an animal's activity in a meaningful and quantitative way where direct observation is not possible. In sequential acceleration data, there is a natural dependence between observations of behaviour, a fact that has been largely ignored in most analyses. Analyses of acceleration data where serial dependence has been explicitly modelled have largely relied on hidden Markov models (HMMs). Depending on...

Abu Dhabi Blue Carbon project

Lisa Schile, J. Boone Kauffman, J. Patrick Megonigal, James Fourqurean & Stephen Crooks
Coastal ecosystems produce and sequester significant amounts of carbon (‘blue carbon’), which has been well documented in humid and semi-humid regions of temperate and tropical climates but less so in arid regions where mangroves, marshes, and seagrasses exist near the limit of their tolerance for extreme temperature and salinity. To better understand these unique systems, we measured whole-ecosystem carbon stocks (above- and belowground biomass and soil) in 58 sites across the United Arab Emirates in...

Data from: Carbon recovery dynamics following disturbance by selective logging in Amazonian forests

Camille Piponiot, Plinio Sist, Lucas Mazzei, Marielos Peña-Claros, Francis E. Putz, Ervan Rutishauser, Alexander Shenkin, Nataly Ascarrunz, Celso P. De Azevedo, Christopher Baraloto, Mabiane França, Marcelino Guedes, Eurídice N. Honorio Coronado, Marcus V. N. D'Oliveira, Ademir R. Ruschel, Katia E. Da Silva, Eleneide Doff Sotta, Cintia R. De Souza, Edson Vidal, Thales A. P. West, Bruno Hérault & Thales AP West
When 2 Mha of Amazonian forests are disturbed by selective logging each year, more than 90 Tg of carbon (C) is emitted to the atmosphere. Emissions are then counterbalanced by forest regrowth. With an original modelling approach, calibrated on a network of 133 permanent forest plots (175 ha total) across Amazonia, we link regional differences in climate, soil and initial biomass with survivors' and recruits' C fluxes to provide Amazon-wide predictions of post-logging C recovery....

Data from: Fire frequency drives habitat selection by a diverse herbivore guild impacting top–down control of plant communities in an African savanna

Deron E. Burkepile, Dave I. Thompson, Richard W. S. Fynn, Sally E. Koerner, Stephanie Eby, Navashni Govender, Nicole Hagenah, Nathan P. Lemoine, Katherine J. Matchett, Kevin R. Wilcox, Scott L. Collins, Kevin P. Kirkman, Alan K. Knapp & Melinda D. Smith
In areas with diverse herbivore communities such as African savannas, the frequency of disturbance by fire may alter the top–down role of different herbivore species on plant community dynamics. In a seven year experiment in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, we examined the habitat use of nine common herbivore species across annually burned, triennially burned and unburned areas. We also used two types of exclosures (plus open access controls) to examine the impacts of...

Data from: Meek mothers with powerful daughters: effects of novel host environments and small trait differences on parasitoid competition

Gabriela Hamerlinck, Nathan P. Lemoine, Glen R. Hood, Karen C. Abbott & Andrew A. Forbes
Outcomes of competition may depend both on subtle differences in traits relevant to fitness and on how those traits are expressed in the context of the environment. Environmental effects on traits impacting population dynamics are often overlooked in studies of parasitic wasp (parasitoid) competition. Lineages of the parasitoid Diachasma alloeum (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) differ in relative ovipositor length (a trait affecting the proportion of hosts available for parasitism). Since the size of natal hosts affects the...

Data from: Changing light conditions in pine rockland habitats affect the intensity and outcome of ant–plant interactions

Ian M. Jones, Suzanne Koptur, Hilma R. Gallegos, Joseph P. Tardanico, Patricia A. Trainer & Jorge Peña
Extrafloral nectar (EFN) mediates food-for-protection mutualisms between plants and ants. Such mutualisms exist within a complex web of biotic interactions, and in a framework provided by the abiotic environment. Both biotic and abiotic factors, therefore, affect the outcome of ant–plant interactions. We conducted an experiment to determine the effects of ant activity, and light intensity, on herbivory rates, growth, and reproductive fitness in Senna mexicana var. chapmanii, a perennial legume native to pine rockland habitats...

Data from: Global population genetic dynamics of a highly migratory, apex predator shark

Andrea M. Bernard, Kevin A. Feldheim, Michael R. Heithaus, Sabine P. Wintner, Bradley M. Wetherbee & Mahmood S. Shivji
Knowledge of genetic connectivity dynamics in the world's large-bodied, highly migratory, apex predator sharks across their global ranges is limited. One such species, the tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier), occurs worldwide in warm temperate and tropical waters, uses remarkably diverse habitats (nearshore to pelagic) and possesses a generalist diet that can structure marine ecosystems through top-down processes. We investigated the phylogeography and the global population structure of this exploited, phylogenetically enigmatic shark by using 10 nuclear...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • Florida International University
    7
  • University of Florida
    2
  • Colorado State University
    2
  • University of KwaZulu-Natal
    2
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1
  • University of Notre Dame
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • Instituto de Investigaciones de la Amazonía Peruana
    1
  • University of Rhode Island
    1
  • University of Botswana
    1