99 Works

Data from: The contribution of post-copulatory mechanisms to incipient ecological speciation in sticklebacks

Joshka Kaufmann, Christophe Eizaguirre, Manfred Milinski & Tobias L. Lenz
Ecology can play a major role in species diversification. As individuals are adapting to contrasting habitats, reproductive barriers may evolve at multiple levels. While pre-mating barriers have been extensively studied, the evolution of post-mating reproductive isolation during early stages of ecological speciation remains poorly understood. In diverging three-spined stickleback ecotypes from two lakes and two rivers, we observed differences in sperm traits between lake and river males. Interestingly, these differences did not translate into ecotype-specific...

Data from: Anthropogenic hybridization between endangered migratory and commercially harvested stationary whitefish taxa (Coregonus spp.)

Jan Dierking, Luke Phelps, Kim Præbel, Gesine Ramm, Enno Prigge, Jost Borcherding, Matthias Brunke & Christophe Eizaguirre
Natural hybridization plays a key role in the process of speciation. However, anthropogenic (human induced) hybridization of historically isolated taxa raises conservation issues. Due to weak barriers to gene flow and the presence of endangered taxa, the whitefish species complex is an excellent study system to investigate the consequences of hybridization in conservation. We focused on three naturally reproductively isolated whitefish taxa in Germany: the endangered, anadromous North Sea houting (NSH) and Baltic houting (BH),...

Data from: Effects of experimental warming on biodiversity depend on ecosystem type and local species composition

Daniel S. Gruner, Matthew E. S. Bracken, Stella A. Berger, Britas Klemens Eriksson, Lars Gamfeldt, Birte Matthiessen, Stefanie Moorthi, Ulrich Sommer & Helmut Hillebrand
Climatic warming is a primary driver of change in ecosystems worldwide. Here, we synthesize responses of species richness and evenness from 187 experimental warming studies in a quantitative meta-analysis. We asked 1) whether effects of warming on diversity were detectable and consistent across terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems, 2) if effects on diversity correlated with intensity, duration, and experimental unit size of temperature change manipulations, and 3) whether these experimental effects on diversity interacted with...

Retreat of Humboldt Gletscher, North Greenland, driven by undercutting from a warmer ocean

Eric Rignot, Lu An, Nolwenn Chauché, Mathieu Morlighem, Seongsu Jeong, Michael Wood, Jeremie Mouginot, Joshua Willis, Ingo Klaucke, Wilhelm Weinrebe & Andreas Muenchow
Humboldt Gletscher is a 100-km wide, slow-moving glacier in north Greenland which holds a 19-cm global sea level equivalent. Humboldt has been the fourth largest contributor to sea level rise since 1972 but the cause of its mass loss has not been elucidated. Multi-beam echo sounding data collected in 2019 indicate a seabed 200 m deeper than previously known. Conductivity temperature depth (CTD) data reveal the presence of warm water of Atlantic origin at 0°C...

ADCP current measurements (75 kHz) during Maria S. Merian cruise MSM96

Timm Schoening, Robert Kopte, Jochen Mohrmann & Iason-Zois Gazis
Upper-ocean velocities along the cruise track of Maria S. Merian cruise MSM96 were continuously collected by a vessel-mounted Teledyne RD Instruments 75 kHz Ocean Surveyor ADCP. The transducer was located at 6.5 m below the water line. The instrument was operated in narrowband mode with 8 m bins and a blanking distance of 4.0 m, while 100 bins were recorded using a pulse of 1.43 s. The ship's velocity was calculated from position fixes obtained...

ADCP current measurements (38 kHz) during Maria S. Merian cruise MSM88/1

Colin W Devey & Robert Kopte
Upper-ocean velocities along the cruise track of Maria S. Merian cruise MSM88/1 were continuously collected by a vessel-mounted Teledyne RD Instruments 38 kHz Ocean Surveyor ADCP. The transducer was located at 6.5 m below the water line. The instrument was operated in narrowband mode with 32 m bins and a blanking distance of 16.0 m, while 50 bins were recorded using a pulse of 2.90 s. The ship's velocity was calculated from position fixes obtained...

Biometric conversion factors as a unifying platform for comparative assessment of invasive freshwater bivalves

Neil Coughlan, Eoghan Cunningham, Ross Cuthbert, Patrick Joyce, Pedro Anastacio, Filipe Banha, Nicolás Bonel, Stephanie Bradbeer, Elizabeta Briski, Vincent Butitta, Zuzana Čadková, Jaimie Dick, Karel Douda, Lawrence Eagling, Noé Ferreira-Rodríguez, Leandro Hünicken, Mattias Johansson, Louise Kregting, Anna Labecka, Deliang Li, Florencia Liquin, Jonathan Marescaux, Todd Morris, Patrycja Nowakowska, Małgorzata Ożgo … & Francisco Sylvester
1. Invasive bivalves continue to spread and negatively impact freshwater ecosystems worldwide. As different metrics for body size and biomass are frequently used within the literature to standardise bivalve related ecological impacts (e.g. respiration and filtration rates), the lack of broadly applicable conversion equations currently hinders reliable comparison across bivalve populations. To facilitate improved comparative assessment amongst studies originating from disparate geographic locations, we report body size and biomass conversion equations for six invasive freshwater...

Cellular costs underpin micronutrient limitation in phytoplankton

J. Scott P. McCain, Alessandro Tagliabue, Edward Susko, Eric P. Achterberg, Andrew E. Allen & Erin M. Bertrand
Micronutrients control phytoplankton growth in the ocean, influencing carbon export and fisheries. It is currently unclear how micronutrient scarcity affects cellular processes, and how interdependence across micronutrients arises. We show that proximate causes of micronutrient growth limitation and interdependence are governed by cumulative cellular costs of acquiring and using micronutrients. Using a mechanistic proteomic allocation model of a polar diatom focused on iron and manganese, we demonstrate how cellular processes fundamentally underpin micronutrient limitation, and...

Continuous thermosalinograph oceanography along RV Maria S. Merian cruise MSM98

Miriam Römer & Michael Schlundt
Underway temperature and salinity data was collected along the cruise track with two autonomous measurement systems. Usually, the systems are changed after 12 hours. While temperature is taken at the water inlet in about 6.5 m depth, salinity is estimated within the interior measurement container from conductivity and interior temperature. Salinity was calibrated independently for both measurement containers (MCs). No correction was done for temperature. For details to all processing steps see Data Processing Report.

Continuous thermosalinograph oceanography along RV SONNE cruise SO278

Michael Schlundt
Underway temperature and salinity data was collected along the cruise track with two autonomous measurement systems, called self-cleaning monitoring boxes (SMBs). Usually, the SMBs are changed after ~12 hours. While temperature is taken at the water inlet in about 3 m depth, salinity is estimated within the SMB from conductivity and interior temperature. No calibration was performed, neither for temperature nor for salinity. For details to all processing steps see Data Processing Report.

Continuous thermosalinograph oceanography along RV Sonne cruise SO280

Saskia Brix, Michael Schlundt, Simon Tewes & James Taylor
Underway temperature and salinity data was collected along the cruise track with two autonomous measurement systems, called self-cleaning monitoring boxes (SMBs). Usually, the SMBs are changed after 12 hours. While temperature is taken at the water inlet in about 3 m depth, salinity is estimated within the SMB from conductivity and interior temperature. Salinity was calibrated for SMB_A against discrete water samples (see additional attachment). No salinity calibration was performed for SMB_B and no temperature...

Continuous thermosalinograph oceanography along RV SONNE cruise SO276

Saskia Brix, Michael Schlundt, Simon Tewes & James Taylor
Underway temperature and salinity data was collected along the cruise track with two autonomous measurement systems, called self-cleaning monitoring boxes (SMBs). Usually, the SMBs are changed after 12 hours. However, on this cruise only SMB_B was working properly. While temperature is taken at the water inlet in about 3 m depth, salinity is estimated within the SMB from conductivity and interior temperature. No calibration was performed, neither for temperature nor for salinity. For details to...

Do alternative resources dampen functional responses of native but not alien gammarids?

Ross N Cuthbert, Syrmalenia G Kotronaki, Jasmin C Hütt, Elisabeth Renk, Niklas Warlo & Elizabeta Briski
While aquatic invasive predators are among the most impactful trophic groups, we lack understanding of whether alternative food resources mediate adverse predatory effects and stabilise native prey communities. Here, we use comparative functional responses to examine the influence of alternative food resources (Fucus sp.) on predator-prey interaction strengths from three gammarid crustaceans, with one native (Gammarus locusta) and two existing and emerging invasive (Gammarus tigrinus, Pontogammarus maeoticus, respectively) species, towards larval chironomid prey. All gammarids...

Continuous thermosalinograph oceanography along RV MARIA S. MERIAN cruise track MSM102

Sebastian Krastel & Michael Schlundt
Underway temperature and salinity data was collected along the cruise track with two autonomous measurement systems. Usually, the systems are changed after 6 hours. While temperature is taken at the water inlet in about 6.5 m depth, salinity is estimated within the interior measurement container from conductivity and interior temperature. Salinity was calibrated independently for both measurement containers (MCs). No correction was done for temperature. For details to all processing steps see Data Processing Report.

Supplementary materials: Indirect effects of trophic interactions govern carbon circulation in two beech forest soil ecosystems

Carlos Lozano Fondón, Marco Scotti, Michele Innangi, Cristina Bondavalli, Anna De Marco, Amalia Virzo De Santo, Antonietta Fioretto, Cristina Menta & Antonio Bodini
1. Forests soils harbour a vast array of organisms that govern the processing of organic matter. Through their trophic interactions, they give rise to carbon flows that sustain soil ecosystem functioning. Understanding how soil food webs shape carbon flows may enhance our knowledge about the role of biodiversity on soil processes. 2. In this work, we assembled trophic networks representing soil food webs of two beech forests during spring and autumn and compiled mass-balanced models...

Palaeontological evidence for community-level decrease in mesopelagic fish size during Pleistocene climate warming in the eastern Mediterranean

Konstantina Agiadi, Frédéric Quillévéré, Rafał Nawrot, Theo Sommeville, Marta Coll, Efterpi Koskeridou, Jan Fietzke & Martin Zuschin
Mesopelagic fishes are an important element of marine food webs, a huge, still mostly untapped food resource, and great contributors to the biological carbon pump, whose future under climate change scenarios is unknown. The shrinking of commercial fishes within decades has been an alarming observation, but its causes remain contended. Here, we investigate the effect of warming climate on mesopelagic fish size in the eastern Mediterranean Sea during a glacial-interglacial-glacial transition of the Middle Pleistocene...

Continuous thermosalinograph oceanography along RV MARIA S. MERIAN cruise track MSM-X14

Michael Schlundt
Underway temperature and salinity data was collected along the cruise track with two autonomous measurement systems. Usually, the systems are changed after 6 hours. While temperature is taken at the water inlet in about 6.5 m depth, salinity is estimated within the interior measurement container from conductivity and interior temperature. No calibration was done for temperature and salinity. For details to all processing steps see Data Processing Report.

Continuous thermosalinograph oceanography along RV SONNE cruise track SO284

Peter Brandt, Michael Schlundt & Gerd Krahmann
Underway temperature and salinity data was collected along the cruise track with two autonomous measurement systems, called self-cleaning monitoring boxes (SMBs). Usually the active (measuring) and passive (cleaning) systems are swapped every 12 hours. While temperature is taken at the water inlet in about 4 m depth, salinity is derived from conductivity and interior temperature within the SMB. Salinity was calibrated for each box independently against discrete water samples (see additional attachment). Temperature calibration was...

Data from: Genomic atolls of differentiation in coral reef fishes (Hypoplectrus spp, Serranidae)

Oscar Puebla, Eldredge Bermingham & W. Owen McMillan
Because the vast majority of species are well-diverged, relatively little is known about the genomic architecture of speciation during the early stages of divergence. Species within recent evolutionary radiations are often minimally diverged from a genomic perspective, and therefore provide rare opportunities to address this question. Here, we leverage the hamlet radiation (Hypoplectrus spp, brightly colored reef fishes from the tropical western Atlantic) to characterize genomic divergence during the early stages of speciation. Transect surveys...

Data from: Latitudinal and voltinism compensation shape thermal reaction norms for growth rate

Lisa N S Shama, Melina Campero-Paz, K. Mathias Wegner, Marjan De Block & Robby Stoks
Latitudinal variation in thermal reaction norms of key fitness traits may inform about the response of populations to climate warming, yet their adaptive nature and evolutionary potential is poorly known. We assessed the contribution of quantitative genetic, neutral genetic and environmental effects to thermal reaction norms of growth rate for populations of the damselfly Ischnura elegans. Among populations, reaction norms differed primarily in elevation suggesting that time constraints associated with shorter growth seasons in univoltine,...

Genomic footprints of a biological invasion: introduction from Asia and dispersal in Europe of the topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva)

Miguel Baltazar-Soares, Simon Blanchet, Julien Cote, Ali Serkhan Tarkan, Eva Záhorská, Rodolphe Gozlan & Christophe Eizaguirre
Facilitated by the intensification of global trading, the introduction and dispersal of species to areas in which they are historically non-native is nowadays common. From an evolutionary standpoint, invasions are paradoxical: not only non-native environments could be different from native ones for which introduced individuals would be ill-adapted, but also small founding population size should be associated with reduced adaptive potential. As such, biological invasions are considered valuable real-time evolutionary experiments. Here, we investigated the...

Data from: Macrofouling communities and the degradation of plastic bags in the sea: an in situ experiment

Nora-Charlotte Pauli, Jana S. Petermann, Chrisitan Lott & Miriam Weber
The increasing amount of plastic littered into the sea may provide a new substratum for benthic organisms. These marine fouling communities on plastic have not received much scientific attention. We present, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive analysis of their macroscopic community composition, their primary production and the polymer degradation comparing conventional polyethylene (PE) and a biodegradable starch-based plastic blend in coastal benthic and pelagic habitats in the Mediterranean Sea. The biomass of the fouling...

Single cell transcriptomics of of Abedinium reveals a new early-branching dinoflagellate lineage

Elizabeth Cooney, Noriko Okamoto, Anna Cho, Elisabeth Hehenberger, Thomas Richards, Alexandra Worden, Alyson Santoro, Brian Leander & Patrick Keeling
Dinoflagellates possess many unique cellular characteristics with unresolved evolutionary histories including nuclei with greatly expanded genomes and chromatin packaged using histone-like proteins and dinoflagellate-viral nucleoproteins instead of histones, highly reduced mitochondrial genomes with extensive RNA editing, a mix of photosynthetic and cryptic secondary plastids, and tertiary plastids. Resolving the evolutionary origin of these traits requires understanding their ancestral states and early intermediates. Several deep-branching dinoflagellate lineages are good candidates for such reconstruction, however they tend...

ADCP current measurements (75 kHz) during Maria S. Merian cruise MSM88/1

Colin W Devey & Robert Kopte
Upper-ocean velocities along the cruise track of Maria S. Merian cruise MSM88/1 were continuously collected by a vessel-mounted Teledyne RD Instruments 75 kHz Ocean Surveyor ADCP. The transducer was located at 6 m below the water line. The instrument was operated in narrowband mode with 8 m bins and a blanking distance of 8 m, while 100 bins were recorded using a pulse of 1.45 seconds. The ship's velocity was calculated from position fixes obtained...

Registration Year

  • 2023
    5
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    39
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    18
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    9
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    5
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    4
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    4
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    7
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    2
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    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    99

Affiliations

  • GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel
    54
  • GEOMAR - Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel
    43
  • Institut für Geowissenschaften, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, Kiel
    14
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    5
  • Kiel University
    5
  • Queen's University Belfast
    4
  • University of Gothenburg
    4
  • National Oceanography Centre
    3
  • University of Münster
    3
  • University of Freiburg
    3