101 Works

Data from: Landscape context and substrate characteristics shape fungal communities of dead spruce in urban and semi-natural forests

Aku Korhonen, Otto Miettinen, Johan Kotze & Leena Hamberg
Data from: Korhonen, A., Miettinen, O., Kotze, D.J., & Hamberg, L. (2022). Landscape context and substrate characteristics shape fungal communities of dead spruce in urban and semi-natural forests. Environmental Microbiology. DOI: 10.1111/1462-2920.15903 This dataset contains occurrence data of 475 fungal ITS2 sequence clusters (OTUs) across 360 sequenced samples originating from dead wood of Norway spruce (Picea abies). Wood samples were collected from 90 downed spruce trunks, at four points from each trunk. Trunks were at...

Data from: Pulse of inflammatory proteins in the pregnant uterus of European polecats (Mustela putorius) leading to the time of implantation

Heli Lindeberg, Richard J.S. Burchmore, Malcolm W. Kennedy & Richard J. S. Burchmore
Uterine secretory proteins protect the uterus and conceptuses against infection, facilitate implantation, control cellular damage resulting from implantation, and supply pre-implantation embryos with nutrients. Unlike in humans, the early conceptus of the European polecat (Mustela putorius; ferret) grows and develops free in the uterus until implanting at about 12 days after mating. We found that the proteins appearing in polecat uteri changed dramatically with time leading to implantation. Several of these proteins have also been...

Data from: Night reveals individuality in a shoaling fish

Laura Härkönen, Nico Alioravainen, Anssi Vainikka & Pekka Hyvärinen
Many animals rely heavily on visual cues from their environment, and therefore show circadian rhythmicity in their behavioral activities. In group-living animals, individuals’ activity rhythms must be synchronized not only with diel light-dark cycle but also with other group members. Increasing evidence has recently shown that circadian behaviors of animals are consistent within individuals and different between individuals, but the sources and consistency of diel activity variation in social context are less known. Using radio...

Data from: Low but significant genetic differentiation underlies biologically meaningful phenotypic divergence in a large Atlantic salmon population

Tutku Aykanat, Susan E. Johnston, Eero Niemelä, Panu Orell, Jaakko Erkinaro & Craig R. Primmer
Despite decades of research assessing the genetic structure of natural populations, the biological meaning of low yet significant genetic divergence often remains unclear due to a lack of associated phenotypic and ecological information. At the same time, structured populations with low genetic divergence and overlapping boundaries can potentially provide excellent models to study adaptation and reproductive isolation in cases where high-resolution genetic markers and relevant phenotypic and life history information are available. Here, we combined...

Data from: Estimating population density of the white-tailed deer in Finland using non-invasive genetic sampling and spatial capture–recapture

Jenni Poutanen, Jyrki Pusenius, Mikael Wikström & Jon E. Brommer
The white-tailed deer is an important game species in Finland. We evaluated the potential of estimating the white-tailed deer pre-harvest density using non-invasive DNA collection within a spatial capture–recapture (SCR) framework. We sampled faeces during three weekly visits in autumn 2015 from 180, 20 x 20 m plots clustered in groups of four. Individual identification was based on 12–14 microsatellites. Of the 245 faecal samples collected, an individual could be identified from only 36 (15%)....

Data from: Quantifying in situ phenotypic variability in the hydraulic properties of four tree species across their distribution range in Europe

Sylvain Delzon, N. González-Muñoz, J. M. Torres-Ruiz, G. Capdeville, F. Sterck, P. Copini, G. Petit, G. Von Arx, A. Lintunen, L. Grönlund, T. Hölttä, M. C. Caldeira, R. Lobo-Do-Vale & M. Peltoniemi
Many studies have reported that hydraulic properties vary considerably between tree species, but little is known about their intraspecific variation and, therefore, their capacity to adapt to a warmer and drier climate. Here, we quantify phenotypic divergence and clinal variation for embolism resistance, hydraulic conductivity and branch growth, in four tree species, two angiosperms (Betula pendula, Populus tremula) and two conifers (Picea abies, Pinus sylvestris), across their latitudinal distribution in Europe. Growth and hydraulic efficiency...

Data from: Ignoring spatial effects results in inadequate models for variation in littoral macroinvertebrate diversity

Kimmo T. Tolonen, Annika Vilmi, Satu-Maaria Karjalainen, Seppo Hellsten, Tapio Sutela & Jani Heino
Studies focusing on the effects of spatial processes versus environmental filtering on aquatic metacommunities have so far been focused almost entirely on relatively isolated systems, such as sets of different lakes or streams. In contrast, metacommunity patterns and underlying processes within a single aquatic system have received less attention. In this study, we aimed to examine how strongly variations in different diversity indices are affected by spatial processes (dispersal) versus local environmental conditions (species sorting)...

Data from: Genetic substructure and admixture as important factors in linkage disequilibrium-based estimation of effective number of breeders in recovering wildlife populations

Alexander Kopatz, Hans Geir Eiken, Julia Schregel, Jouni Aspi, Ilpo Kojola & Snorre B. Hagen
The number of effective breeders (Nb) and effective population size (Ne) are population parameters reflective of evolutionary potential, susceptibility to stochasticity, and viability. We have estimated these parameters using the linkage disequilibrium-based approach with LDNE through the latest phase of population recovery of the brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Finland (1993–2010; N = 621). This phase of the recovery was recently documented to be associated with major changes in genetic composition. In particular, differentiation between...

Data from: Severity of impacts of an introduced species corresponds with regional eco-evolutionary experience

Kimberley T. Davis, Ragan M. Callaway, Alex Fajardo, Anibal Pauchard, Martin A Nunez, Rob W Brooker, Bruce D. Maxwell, Romina D Dimarco, Duane A Peltzer, Bill Mason, Seppo Ruotsalainen, Anne C S McIntosh, Robin J Pakeman, Alyssa Laney Smith & Michael Gundale
Invasive plant impacts vary widely across introduced ranges. We tested the hypothesis that differences in the eco-evolutionary experience of native communities with the invader correspond with the impacts of invasive species on native vegetation, with impacts increasing with ecological novelty. We compared plant species richness and composition beneath Pinus contorta to that in adjacent vegetation and other P. contorta stands across a network of sites in its native (Canada and USA) and non-native (Argentina, Chile,...

Data from: Rapid sex-specific evolution of age at maturity is shaped by genetic architecture in Atlantic salmon

Yann Czorlich, Tutku Aykanat, Jaakko Erkinaro, Panu Orell & Craig R. Primmer
Understanding the mechanisms by which populations adapt to their environments is a fundamental aim in biology. However, it remains challenging to identify the genetic basis of traits, provide evidence of genetic changes and quantify phenotypic responses. Age at maturity in Atlantic salmon represents an ideal trait to study contemporary adaptive evolution as it has been associated with a single locus in the vgll3 region, and has also strongly changed in recent decades. Here, we provide...

Soil property, microbial abundance, and plant and invertebrate biomass data across a natural soil temperature gradient in Iceland from August 2018

Sinikka Robinson, Eoin O'Gorman, Beat Frey, Marleena Hagner & Juha Mikola
This is a dataset of soil physiochemical properties, bacterial and fungal abundance, and above and belowground plant and invertebrate biomass, sampled at 40 plots in the Hengill geothermal valley, Iceland, from 15th to 22nd August 2018. The plots span a temperature gradient of 10-35 °C over the sampling period, and this temperature gradient is consistent over time. The dataset also includes data on the decomposition rate of soil organic matter, which was sampled at 60...

Selection of indicators for assessing and managing the impacts of bottom trawling on seabed habitats

Jan Geert Hiddink, Michel Kaiser, Marija Sciberras, Robert McConnaughey, Tessa Mazor, Ray Hilborn, Jeremy Collie, C. Roland Pitcher, Ana Parma, Petri Suuronen, Adriaan Rijnsdorp & Simon Jennings
1. Bottom-trawl fisheries are the most-widespread source of anthropogenic physical disturbance to seabed habitats. Development of fisheries-, conservation- and ecosystem-based management strategies requires the selection of indicators of the impact of bottom trawling on the state of benthic biota. Many indicators have been proposed, but no rigorous test of a range of candidate indicators against 9 commonly-agreed criteria (concreteness, theoretical basis, public awareness, cost, measurement, historical data, sensitivity, responsiveness, specificity) has been performed. 2. Here,...

Data from: Assessing the effectiveness of a national protected area network in maintaining carnivore populations

Julien Terraube, Jasper Van Doninck, Pekka Helle & Mar Cabeza
Protected areas (PAs) are essential to prevent further biodiversity loss yet their effectiveness varies largely with governance and external threats. Although methodological advances have permitted assessments of PA effectiveness in mitigating deforestation, we still lack similar studies for the impact of PAs on wildlife populations. Here we demonstrate the application ofuse an innovative combination of matching methods and hurdle-mixed models with a large-scale and long-term dataset of unprecedented coverage for Finland’s large carnivore species. We...

Morphological trait database of saproxylic beetles

Jonas Hagge, Jörg Müller, Tone Birkemoe, Jörn Buse, Rune Haubo Bojesen Christensen, Martin M. Gossner, Axel Gruppe, Christoph Heibl, Andrea Jarzabek-Müller, Sebastian Seibold, Juha Siitonen, João Gonçalo Soutinho, Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson, Simon Thorn & Lukas Drag
The extinction of species is a non-random process, and understanding why some species are more likely to go extinct than others is critical for conservation efforts. Functional trait-based approaches offer a promising tool to achieve this goal. In forests, deadwood-dependent (saproxylic) beetles comprise a major part of threatened species, but analyses of their extinction risk have been hindered by the availability of suitable morphological traits. To better understand the mechanisms underlying extinction in insects, we...

Microsatellite variation in Nordic semi-domestic reindeer

Knut Røed, Kjersti Kvie, Bård-Jørgen Bårdsen, Sauli Laaksonen, Hannes Lohi, Juoko Kumpula, Kjell-Åke Aronsson, Birgitta Åhman, Jørn Våge & Øystein Holand
We have analyzed DNA microsatellites and the mitochondrial control region in reindeer from 31 different husbandry areas in Norway, Sweden and Finland in order to better understand the processes that underlie the genetic variability of the Nordic domestic herds. The distinct differentiation found in the nuclear markers but less so in the mitochondrial marker, gives evidence of an origin from a common ancestral population which later evolved into the two main gene pools characterizing the...

Wild reindeer, wolf and moose population dynamics in Eastern Finland

Ilpo Kojola
Background. The alternative prey hypothesis describes the mechanism for apparent competition whereby the mortality of the secondary prey species increases (and population size decreases) by the increased predation by the shared predator if the population size of the primary prey decreases. Apparent competition is a process where the abundance of two co-existing prey species are negatively associated because they share a mutual predator, which negatively affects the abundance of both prey. Here, we examined whether...

Rumen bacteria, archaea and ciliate protozoa data from animal trial with Nordic Red dairy cows

Ilma Tapio
Four multiparous dairy cows fitted with rumen cannula were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square with 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to examine how starch level and oil mixture impact dry matter (DM) intake and digestibility, milk yield and composition, rumen fermentation, ruminal methane (CH4) emissions, and microbial diversity. Experimental treatments were comprised of high (HS) or low (LS) levels of starch containing 0 or 30 g of a mixture of...

Host plant phenology, insect outbreaks and herbivore communities – The importance of timing

Adam Ekholm, Ayco J. M. Tack, Pertti Pulkkinen & Tomas Roslin
1. Climate change may alter the dynamics of outbreak species by changing the phenological synchrony between herbivores and their host plants. As host plant phenology has a genotypic component that may interact with climate, infestation levels among genotypes might change accordingly. When the outbreaking herbivore is active early in the season, its infestation levels may also leave a detectable imprint on herbivores colonizing the plant later in the season. 2. In this study, we first...

Data from: Stabilizing selection and adaptive evolution in a combination of two traits in an arctic ungulate

Håkon Holand, Thomas Kvalnes, Knut Røed, Øystein Holand, Bernt-Erik Sæther & Jouko Kumpula
Stabilizing selection is thought to be common in wild populations and act as one of the main evolutionary mechanisms which constrain phenotypic variation. When multiple traits interact to create a combined phenotype, correlational selection may be an important process driving adaptive evolution. Here we report on phenotypic selection and evolutionary changes in two natal traits in a semi-domestic population of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) in northern Finland. The population has been closely monitored since 1969, and...

High genomic diversity in the bank vole at the northern apex of a range expansion: the role of multiple colonizations and end-glacial refugia

Silvia Marková, Michaela Horníková, Hayley Lanier, Heikki Henttonen, Jeremy Searle, Lawrence Weider & Petr Kotlík
The history of repeated northern glacial cycling and southern climatic stability has long dominated explanations for how genetic diversity is distributed within temperate species in Eurasia and North America. However, growing evidence indicates the importance of cryptic refugia for northern colonization dynamics. An excellent geographic region to assess this is Fennoscandia, where recolonization at the end of the last glaciation was restricted to specific routes and temporal windows. We used genomic data to analyze genetic...

Offspring phenotype is shaped by the non-sperm fraction of semen

Jukka Kekäläinen, Annalaura Jokiniemi, Matti Janhunen & Hannu Huuskonen
In a large majority of animal species, the only contribution of males to the next generation has been assumed to be their genes (sperm). However, along with sperm, seminal plasma contains a wide array of extracellular factors that have many important functions in reproduction. Yet, the potential intergenerational effects of these factors are virtually unknown. We investigated these effects in European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus) by experimentally manipulating the presence and identity of seminal plasma and...

Data from: SNPs to discriminate different classes of hybrid between wild Atlantic salmon and aquaculture escapees

Victoria L. Pritchard, Jaakko Erkinaro, Matthew P. Kent, Eero Niemelä, Panu Orell, Sigbjørn Lien & Craig R. Primmer
Many wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) populations are threatened by introgressive hybridization from domesticated fish that have escaped from aquaculture facilities. A detailed understanding of the hybridization dynamics between wild salmon and aquaculture escapees requires discrimination of different hybrid classes, however markers currently available to discriminate the two types of parental genome have limited power to do this. Using a high-density Atlantic salmon SNP array in combination with pooled-sample allelotyping and an Fst outlier approach,...

Data from: Temporal dynamics of Puumala hantavirus infection in cyclic populations of bank voles

Liina Voutilainen, Eva R. Kallio, Jukka Niemimaa, Olli Vapalahti & Heikki Henttonen
Understanding the dynamics of zoonotic pathogens in their reservoir host populations is a prerequisite for predicting and preventing human disease epidemics. The human infection risk of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) is highest in northern Europe, where populations of the rodent host (bank vole, Myodes glareolus) undergo cyclic fluctuations. We conducted a 7-year capture-mark-recapture study to monitor seasonal and multiannual patterns of the PUUV infection rate in bank vole populations exhibiting a 3-year density cycle. Infected bank...

Data from: Global warming will affect the maximum potential abundance of boreal plant species

Sara Villén-Pérez, Juha Heikkinen, Maija Salemaa & Raisa Mäkipää
Forecasting the impact of future global warming on biodiversity requires understanding how temperature limits the distribution of species. Here we rely on Liebig’s Law of Minimum to estimate the effect of temperature on the maximum potential abundance that a species can attain at a certain location. We develop 95%-quantile regressions to model the influence of effective temperature sum on the maximum potential abundance of 25 common understory plant species of Finland, along 868 nationwide plots...

Time spent in distinct life-history stages has sex-specific effects on reproductive fitness in wild Atlantic salmon

Kenyon Mobley, Hanna Granroth-Wilding, Mikko Ellmen, Panu Orell, Jaakko Erkinaro & Craig Primmer
In species with complex life cycles, life history theory predicts that fitness is affected by conditions encountered in previous life history stages. Here, we use a four-year pedigree to investigate if time spent in two distinct life history stages has sex-specific reproductive fitness consequences in anadromous Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). We determined the amount of years spent in fresh water as juveniles (freshwater age, FW, measured in years), and years spent in the marine environment...

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