9 Works

Data from: Spatial separation without territoriality in shark communities

Yannis P. Papastamatiou, Thomas W. Bodey, Alan M. Friedlander, Christopher G. Lowe, Darcy Bradley, Kevin Weng, Victoria Priestley & Jennifer E. Caselle
Spatial separation within predator communities can arise via territoriality but also from competitive interactions between and within species. However, linking competitive interactions to predator distribution patterns is difficult and theoretical models predict different habitat selection patterns dependent on habitat quality and how competition manifests itself. While models generally consider competitors to be either equal in ability, or for one phenotype to have a fixed advantage over the other, few studies consider that an animal may...

Data from: Form–function relationships in a marine foundation species depend on scale: a shoot to global perspective from a distributed ecological experiment

Jennifer L. Ruesink, John J. Stachowicz, Pamela L. Reynolds, Christoffer Boström, Mathieu Cusson, James Douglass, Johan Eklöf, Aschwin H. Engelen, Masakazu Hori, Kevin Hovel, Katrin Iken, Per-Olav Moksnes, Masahiro Nakaoka, Mary I. O'Connor, Jeanine L. Olsen, Erik E. Sotka, Matthew A. Whalen & Emmett J. Duffy
Form-function relationships in plants underlie their ecosystem roles in supporting higher trophic levels through primary production, detrital pathways, and habitat provision. For widespread, phenotypically-variable plants, productivity may differ not only across abiotic conditions, but also from distinct morphological or demographic traits. A single foundation species, eelgrass (Zostera marina), typically dominates north temperate seagrass meadows, which we studied across 14 sites spanning 32-61° N latitude and two ocean basins. Body size varied by nearly two orders...

Data from: The effects of climate change on a mega-diverse country: predicted shifts in mammalian species richness and turnover in continental Ecuador.

Paula Iturralde-Pólit, Olivier Dangles, Santiago F. Burneo & Christine N. Meynard
Ecuador is one of 17 nations with the greatest diversity in the world, sheltering lowland and mountain regions that are considered global biodiversity hotspots. While these regions are projected to be highly impacted by climate change, it is not clear what would be the consequences for faunal diversity and conservation. To address this issue, we used an ensemble of 8 species distribution models (SDM) to determine future shifts and identify areas of high changes in...

Data from: Particle-association lifestyle is a phylogenetically conserved trait in bathypelagic prokaryotes

Guillem Salazar Guiral, Francisco Cornejo-Castillo, Encarna Borrull, Cristina Díez-Vives, Elena Lara, Dolors Vaqué, Jesús Arrieta, Carlos Duarte, Josep Gasol & Silvia Acinas
The free-living (FL) and particle-attached (PA) marine microbial communities have repeatedly been proved to differ in their diversity and composition in the photic ocean and also recently in the bathypelagic ocean at a global scale. However, although high taxonomic ranks have been proved to exhibit preferences for a PA or FL mode of life, it remains poorly understood whether two clear lifestyles do exist and how these are distributed across the prokaryotic phylogeny. We studied...

Data from: A multispecies approach reveals hot-spots and cold-spots of diversity and connectivity in invertebrate species with contrasting dispersal modes

Abigail E. Cahill, Aurelien De Jode, Sophie Dubois, Zoheir Bouzaza, Didier Aurelle, Emilie Boissin, Olivier Chabrol, Romain David, Emilie Egea, Jean-Baptiste Ledoux, Bastien Merigot, Alexandra Anh-Thu Weber & Anne Chenuil
Genetic diversity is crucial for species’ maintenance and persistence, yet is often overlooked in conservation studies. Species diversity is more often reported due to practical constraints, but it is unknown if these measures of diversity are correlated. In marine invertebrates, adults are often sessile or sedentary and populations exchange genes via dispersal of gametes and larvae. Species with a larval period are expected to have more connected populations than those without larval dispersal. We assessed...

Data from: Genome architecture enables local adaptation of Atlantic cod despite high connectivity

Julia M. I. Barth, Paul R. Berg, Per R. Jonsson, Sara Bonanomi, Hanna Corell, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen, Kjetill S. Jakobsen, Kerstin Johannesson, Per Erik Jorde, Halvor Knutsen, Per-Olav Moksnes, Bastiaan Star, Nils Chr. Stenseth, Henrik Svedäng, Sissel Jentoft & Carl André
Adaptation to local conditions is a fundamental process in evolution; however, mechanisms maintaining local adaptation despite high gene flow are still poorly understood. Marine ecosystems provide a wide array of diverse habitats that frequently promote ecological adaptation even in species characterized by strong levels of gene flow. As one example, populations of the marine fish Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are highly connected due to immense dispersal capabilities but nevertheless show local adaptation in several key...

Data from: Expert, crowd, students or algorithm: who holds the key to deep-sea imagery ‘big data’ processing?

Marjolaine Matabos, Maia Hoeberechts, Carol Doya, Jacopo Aguzzi, Jessica Nephin, Tom E. Reimchen, Steve Leaver, Roswitha M. Marx, Alexandra Branzan Albu, Ryan Fier, Ulla Fernandez-Arcaya, S. Kim Juniper & Thomas E. Reimchen
1. Recent technological development has increased our capacity to study the deep sea and the marine benthic realm, particularly with the development of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories. Since 2006, Ocean Networks Canada cabled observatories, has acquired nearly 65 TB and over 90,000 hours of video data from seafloor cameras and Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs). Manual processing of these data is time-consuming and highly labour-intensive, and cannot be comprehensively undertaken by individual researchers. These videos contain valuable...

Data from: Changes in the location of biodiversity–ecosystem function hot spots across the seafloor landscape with increasing sediment nutrient loading

Simon F. Thrush, Judi E. Hewitt, Casper Kraan, A. M. Lohrer, Conrad A. Pilditch & Emily Douglas
Declining biodiversity and loss of ecosystem function threatens the ability of habitats to contribute ecosystem services. However, the form of the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem function (BEF) and how relationships change with environmental change is poorly understood. This limits our ability to predict the consequences of biodiversity loss on ecosystem function, particularly in real-world marine ecosystems that are species rich, and where multiple ecosystem functions are represented by multiple indicators. We investigated spatial variation...

Data from: Impact of disease on the survival of three commercially fished species

John M. Hoenig, Maya L. Groner, Matthew W. Smith, Wolfgang K. Vogelbein, David M. Taylor, , John T. Swenarton, David T. Gauthier, Philip Sadler, Mark A. Matsche, Ashley N. Haines, Hamish J. Small, Roger Pradel, Rémi Choquet & Jeffrey D. Shields
Recent increases in emergent infectious diseases have raised concerns about the population stability of some marine species. The complexity and expense of studying diseases in marine systems often dictate that conservation and management decisions are made without quantitative data on population-level impacts of disease. Mark-recapture is a powerful, underutilized, tool for calculating impacts of disease on population size and structure, even in the absence of etiological information. We applied logistic regression models to mark-recapture data...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Institute of Marine Science
    9
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • University of Gothenburg
    2
  • College of William & Mary
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  • College of Charleston
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • University of California System
    1
  • University of Groningen
    1
  • University of Waikato
    1
  • University of Algarve
    1