8 Works

Data from: Best practices for justifying fossil calibrations

James F. Parham, Philip C. J. Donoghue, Christopher J. Bell, Tyler D. Calway, Jason J. Head, Patricia A. Holroyd, Jun G. Inoue, Randall B. Irmis, Walter G. Joyce, Daniel T. Ksepka, José S. L. Patané, Nathan D. Smith, James E. Tarver, Marcel Van Tuinen, Ziheng Yang, Kenneth D. Angielczyk, Jenny M. Greenwood, Christy A. Hipsley, Jacobs Louis, Peter J. Makovicky, Johannes Müller, Krister T. Smith, Jessica M. Theodor, Rachel C. M. Warnock, Michael J. Benton … & Louis Jacobs
Our ability to correlate biological evolution with climate change, geological evolution, and other historical patterns is essential to understanding the processes that shape biodiversity. Combining data from the fossil record with molecular phylogenetics represents an exciting synthetic approach to this challenge. The first molecular divergence dating analysis (Zuckerkandl and Pauling 1962) was based on a measure of the amino acid differences in the hemoglobin molecule; with replacement rates established (calibrated) using inaccurate paleontological age estimates...

Data from: Hierarchical polygyny in multiparous lesser flat-headed bats

Panyu Hua, Libiao Zhang, Guangjian Zhu, Gareth Jones, Shuyi Zhang & Stephen James Rossiter
How males gain access to mates and the potential for female choice will determine whether polygyny can operate at several levels, from within litters and groups to the wider population. Female lesser flat-headed bats (Tylonycteris pachypus) form maternity groups in bamboo stems. Unusually for bats, they are multiparous, providing the opportunity to test whether multi-level polygyny differs among males depending on whether they roost with females, with males, or are solitary. We genotyped 662 individuals...

Data from: Social organisation and genetic structure: insights from co-distributed bat populations

Stephen J. Rossiter, Akbar Zubaid, Adura Mohd-Adnan, Matthew J. Struebig, Thomas H. Kunz, Sucharita Gopal, Eric J. Petit & Tigga Kingston
The impact of ecology and social organisation on genetic structure at landscape spatial scales, where gene dynamics shape evolution as well as determine susceptibility to habitat fragmentation, is poorly understood. Attempts to assess these effects must take into account the potentially confounding effects of history. We used microsatellites to compare genetic structure in seven bat species with contrasting patterns of roosting ecology and social organisation, all of which are co-distributed in an ancient forest habitat...

Data from: Taxonomic structure of the fossil record is shaped by sampling bias

Graeme T. Lloyd, Jeremy R. Young & Andrew B. Smith
Understanding biases that affect how species are partitioned into higher taxa is critical for much of palaeobiology, as higher taxa are commonly used to estimate species diversity through time. Using the deep-sea record of coccolithophorid microfossils over the last 150 million years (myr), we demonstrate that sampling and taxonomic effort are important drivers of the species/genus ratio. An unexpected two-stepped change in the ratio of species to genera over the last 150 myr correlates strongly...

Data from: Best practices for justifying fossil calibrations

James F. Parham, Philip C. J. Donoghue, Christopher J. Bell, Tyler D. Calway, Jason J. Head, Patricia A. Holroyd, Jun G. Inoue, Randall B. Irmis, Walter G. Joyce, Daniel T. Ksepka, José S. L. Patané, Nathan D. Smith, James E. Tarver, Marcel Van Tuinen, Ziheng Yang, Kenneth D. Angielczyk, Jenny M. Greenwood, Christy A. Hipsley, Jacobs Louis, Peter J. Makovicky, Johannes Müller, Krister T. Smith, Jessica M. Theodor, Rachel C. M. Warnock, Michael J. Benton … & Louis Jacobs
Our ability to correlate biological evolution with climate change, geological evolution, and other historical patterns is essential to understanding the processes that shape biodiversity. Combining data from the fossil record with molecular phylogenetics represents an exciting synthetic approach to this challenge. The first molecular divergence dating analysis (Zuckerkandl and Pauling 1962) was based on a measure of the amino acid differences in the hemoglobin molecule; with replacement rates established (calibrated) using inaccurate paleontological age estimates...

Data from: Taxonomic structure of the fossil record is shaped by sampling bias

Graeme T. Lloyd, Jeremy R. Young & Andrew B. Smith
Understanding biases that affect how species are partitioned into higher taxa is critical for much of palaeobiology, as higher taxa are commonly used to estimate species diversity through time. Using the deep-sea record of coccolithophorid microfossils over the last 150 million years (myr), we demonstrate that sampling and taxonomic effort are important drivers of the species/genus ratio. An unexpected two-stepped change in the ratio of species to genera over the last 150 myr correlates strongly...

Data from: Hierarchical polygyny in multiparous lesser flat-headed bats

Panyu Hua, Libiao Zhang, Guangjian Zhu, Gareth Jones, Shuyi Zhang & Stephen James Rossiter
How males gain access to mates and the potential for female choice will determine whether polygyny can operate at several levels, from within litters and groups to the wider population. Female lesser flat-headed bats (Tylonycteris pachypus) form maternity groups in bamboo stems. Unusually for bats, they are multiparous, providing the opportunity to test whether multi-level polygyny differs among males depending on whether they roost with females, with males, or are solitary. We genotyped 662 individuals...

Data from: Social organisation and genetic structure: insights from co-distributed bat populations

Stephen J. Rossiter, Akbar Zubaid, Adura Mohd-Adnan, Matthew J. Struebig, Thomas H. Kunz, Sucharita Gopal, Eric J. Petit & Tigga Kingston
The impact of ecology and social organisation on genetic structure at landscape spatial scales, where gene dynamics shape evolution as well as determine susceptibility to habitat fragmentation, is poorly understood. Attempts to assess these effects must take into account the potentially confounding effects of history. We used microsatellites to compare genetic structure in seven bat species with contrasting patterns of roosting ecology and social organisation, all of which are co-distributed in an ancient forest habitat...

Registration Year

  • 2011
    8

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    8

Affiliations

  • University College London
    8
  • University of Bristol
    4
  • National University of Malaysia
    2
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    2
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    2
  • University of California System
    2
  • Humboldt University of Berlin
    2
  • Instituto Butantan
    2
  • Senckenberg Museum
    2
  • Center For Remote Sensing
    2