18 Works

Data from: Thermal adaptation of cellular membranes in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster

Brandon S. Cooper, Loubna A. Hammad & Kristi L/ Montooth
1. Changes in temperature disrupt the fluidity of cellular membranes, which can negatively impact membrane integrity and cellular processes. Many ectotherms, including Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen), adjust the glycerophospholipid composition of their membranes to restore optimal fluidity when temperatures change, a type of trait plasticity termed homeoviscous adaptation. 2. Existing data suggest that plasticity in the relative abundances of the glycerophospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) underlies cellular adaptation to temporal variability in the thermal environment....

Data from: Validation of a rodent model of source memory

Jonathon Crystal, Wesley Alford, W. T. Alford & J. D. Crystal
Source memory represents the origin (source) of information. Recently, we proposed that rats (Rattus norvegicus) remember the source of information. However, an alternative to source memory is the possibility that rats selectively encoded some, but not all, information rather than retrieving an episodic memory. We directly tested this "encoding-failure" hypothesis. Here, we show that rats remember the source of information, under conditions that cannot be attributed to encoding failure. Moreover, source memory lasted at least...

Data from: The nutritionally responsive transcriptome of the polyphenic beetle Onthophagus taurus and the importance of sexual dimorphism and body region

Teiya Kijimoto, Emilie C. Snell-Rood, Melissa H. Pespeni, Guilherme Rocha, Karen Kafadar & Armin P. Moczek
Developmental responses to nutritional variation represent one of the ecologically most important classes of adaptive plasticity. However, knowledge of genome-wide patterns of nutrition-responsive gene expression is limited. Here, we studied genome-wide transcriptional responses to nutritional variation and their dependency on trait and sex in the beetle Onthophagus taurus. We find that averaged across the transcriptome, nutrition contributes less to overall variation in gene expression than do sex or body region, but that for a modest...

Data from: The relative importance of rapid evolution for plant-microbe interactions depends on ecological context

Casey P. TerHorst, Jennifer A. Lau & Jay T. Lennon
Evolution can occur on ecological time-scales, affecting community and ecosystem processes. However, the importance of evolutionary change relative to ecological processes remains largely unknown. Here, we analyse data from a long-term experiment in which we allowed plant populations to evolve for three generations in dry or wet soils and used a reciprocal transplant to compare the ecological effect of drought and the effect of plant evolutionary responses to drought on soil microbial communities and nutrient...

Data from: Extensive introgression in a malaria vector species complex revealed by phylogenomics

Michael C. Fontaine, James B. Pease, Aaron Steele, Robert M. Waterhouse, Daniel E. Neafsey, Igor V. Sharakhov, Xiofang Jiang, Andrew B. Hall, Flaminia Catteruccia, Evdoxia Kakani, Sarah N. Mitchell, Yi-Chieh Wu, Hilary A. Smith, R. Rebecca Love, Mara K. Lawniczak, Michel A. Slotman, Scott J. Emrich, Matthew W. Hahn & Nora J. Besansky
Introgressive hybridization is now recognized as a widespread phenomenon, but its role in evolution remains contested. Here we use newly available reference genome assemblies to investigate phylogenetic relationships and introgression in a medically important group of Afrotropical mosquito sibling species. We have identified the correct species branching order to resolve a contentious phylogeny, and show that lineages leading to the principal vectors of human malaria were among the first to split. Pervasive autosomal introgression between...

Data from: Variability in potential to exploit different soil organic phosphorus compounds among tropical montane tree species

Brian S. Steidinger, Benjamin L. Turner, Adriana Osorio, James W. Dalling & Adriana Corrales
We hypothesized that tropical plant species with different mycorrhizal associations reduce competition for soil phosphorus (P) by specializing to exploit different soil organic P compounds. We assayed the activity of root/mycorrhizal phosphatase enzymes of four tree species with contrasting root symbiotic relationships–arbuscular mycorrhizal (angiosperm and conifer), ectomycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal–collected from one of three soil sites within a montane tropical forest. We also measured growth and foliar P of these seedlings in an experiment with P...

Data from: Resource allocation during ontogeny is influenced by genetic, developmental, and ecological factors in the horned beetle, Onthophagus taurus

Daniel B. Schwab & Armin P. Moczek
Resource allocation trade-offs arise when developing organs are in competition for a limited pool of resources to sustain growth and differentiation. Such competition may constrain the maximal size to which structures can grow and may force a situation in which the evolutionary elaboration of one structure may only be possible at the expense of another. However, recent studies have called into question both the consistency and evolutionary importance of resource allocation trade-offs. This study focuses...

Data from: A shift from magnitude to sign epistasis during adaptive evolution of a bacterial social trait

Peter C. Zee, Helena Mendes-Soares, Yuen-Tsu Nicco Yu, Susanne A. Kraemer, Heike Keller, Stephan Ossowski, Korbinian Schneeberger & Gregory J. Velicer
While the importance of epistasis in evolution has long been recognized, remarkably little is known about the processes by which epistatic interactions evolve in real time in specific biological systems. Here, we have characterized how the epistatic fitness relationship between a social gene and an adapting genome changes radically over a short evolutionary time frame in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. We show that a highly beneficial effect of this social gene in the ancestral...

Data from: Reanalysis suggests that genomic islands of speciation are due to reduced diversity, not reduced gene flow

Tami E. Cruickshank & Matthew W. Hahn
The metaphor of “genomic islands of speciation” was first used to describe heterogeneous differentiation among loci between the genomes of closely related species. The biological model proposed to explain these differences was that the regions showing high levels of differentiation were resistant to gene flow between species, while the remainder of the genome was being homogenized by gene flow and consequently showed lower levels of differentiation. However, the conditions under which such differentiation can occur...

Data from: Exposure to parasites increases promiscuity in a freshwater snail

Deanna M. Soper, Kayla C. King, Daniela Vergara & Curt M. Lively
Under the Red Queen hypothesis, outcrossing can produce genetically variable progeny, which may be more resistant, on average, to locally adapted parasites. Mating with multiple partners may enhance this resistance by further increasing the genetic variation among offspring. We exposed Potamopyrgus antipodarum to the eggs of a sterilising, trematode parasite and tested whether this altered mating behaviour. We found that exposure to parasites increased the number of snail mating pairs and the total number of...

Data from: QTL mapping identifies candidate alleles involved in adaptive introgression and range expansion in a wild sunflower

Kenneth D. Whitney, Karl W. Broman, Nolan C. Kane, Stephen M. Hovick, Rebecca A. Randell & Loren H. Rieseberg
The wild North American sunflowers Helianthus annuus and H. debilis are participants in one of the earliest identified examples of adaptive trait introgression, and the exchange is hypothesized to have triggered a range expansion in H. annuus. However, the genetic basis of the adaptive exchange has not been examined. Here, we combine quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with field measurements of fitness to identify candidate H. debilis QTL alleles likely to have introgressed into H....

Data from: Partner diversity and identity impacts on plant productivity in Acacia-rhizobial interactions

Luke G. Barrett, James D. Bever, Andrew Bissett & Peter H. Thrall
1.Genetic variation for functionally important traits is ubiquitous in communities of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, and while some studies have described significant effects of diversity on the functioning of plant-associated microbial communities, we lack a systematic test of how rhizobial diversity influences plant productivity. 2. The complexity of potential interactions among rhizobia and plants complicates the development of general predictions regarding causal relationships between rhizobial diversity and plant productivity. For example, while rhizobial complementarity may result in...

Data from: Interactive effects of a non-native invasive grass Microstegium vimineum and herbivore exclusion on experimental tree regeneration under differing forest management

Daniel J. Johnson, S. Luke Flory, Angela Shelton, Cynthia Huebner & Keith Clay
1. Invasive plants, herbivores and site management history can play crucial roles in determining plant community composition. The net effects of invasive species on plant communities are well known, but we have a poor understanding of the relative contributions of direct competitive effects of invasive species and their interactions with herbivores and management practices. Understanding interactions among plant invasions, herbivores and management history is critical for predicting and managing long-term ecological effects of invasions on...

Data from: Runaway coevolution: adaptation to heritable and nonheritable environments

Devin M. Drown & Michael J. Wade
Populations evolve in response to the external environment, whether abiotic (e.g., climate) or biotic (e.g., other conspecifics). We investigated how adaptation to biotic, heritable environments differs from adaptation to abiotic, non-heritable environments. We found that, for the same selection coefficients, the coadaptive process between genes and heritable environments is much faster than genetic adaptation to an abiotic non-heritable environment. The increased rate of adaptation results from of the positive association generated by reciprocal selection between...

Data from: Height and clonality traits determine plant community responses to fertilization

Timothy L. Dickson, Gary G. Mittelbach, Heather L. Reynolds & Katherine L. Gross
Fertilization via agricultural inputs and nutrient deposition is one of the major threats to global terrestrial plant richness, yet we still do not fully understand the mechanisms by which fertilization decreases plant richness. Tall clonal species have recently been proposed to cause declines in plant species richness by increasing in abundance in response to fertilization and competing strongly with other species. We tested this hypothesis in a fertilization experiment in a low productivity grassland by...

Data from: Quantitative genetic analysis indicates natural selection on leaf phenotypes across wild tomato species (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon; Solanaceae)

Christopher D. Muir, James B. Pease & Leonie C. Moyle
Adaptive evolution requires both raw genetic material and an accessible path of high fitness from one fitness peak to another. In this study, we used an introgression line (IL) population to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for leaf traits thought to be associated with adaptation to precipitation in wild tomatoes (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon; Solanaceae). A QTL Sign Test showed that several traits likely evolved under directional natural selection. Leaf traits correlated across species do not...

Data from: Genome scans reveal candidate domestication and improvement genes in cultivated sunflower, as well as post-domestication introgression with wild relatives.

Gregory J. Baute, Nolan C. Kane, Christopher J. Grassa, Zhao Lai & Loren H. Rieseberg
• The development of modern crops typically involves both selection and hybridization, but to date most studies have focused on the former. In the present study we explore how both processes, and their interactions, have molded the genome of the cultivated sunflower, a globally important oilseed. • To identify genes targeted by selection during the domestication and improvement of sunflower, and to detect post-domestication hybridization with wild species, we analyzed transcriptome sequences of 80 genotypes,...

Data from: The timing of molecular and morphological changes underlying reproductive transitions in wild tomatoes (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon)

Stacey L. Vosters, Cathleen P. Jewell, Natasha A. Sherman, Frances Einterz, Benjamin K. Blackman & Leonie C. Moyle
Molecular mechanisms underlying the transition from genetic self-incompatibility to self-compatibility are well documented, but the evolution of other reproductive trait changes that accompany shifts in reproductive strategy (mating system) remain comparatively poorly understood. A notable exception is the transition from exserted styles to styles with recessed positions relative to the anthers in wild tomatoes (Solanum Section Lycopersicon). This phenotypic change has been previously attributed to specific mutation in the promoter of a gene that influences...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    18

Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Indiana University Bloomington
    18
  • University of Colorado Boulder
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  • Michigan State University
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  • California State University, Northridge
    1
  • Beloit College
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  • University of Virginia
    1