21 Works

Data from: Concordance of bacterial communities of two tick species and blood of their shared rodent host

Evelyn C. Rynkiewicz, Chris Hemmerich, Clay Fuqua, Keith Clay & Douglas B. Rusch
High-throughput sequencing is revealing that most macro-organisms house diverse microbial communities. Of particular interest are disease vectors whose microbiome could potentially affect pathogen transmission and vector competence. We investigated bacterial community composition and diversity of the ticks Dermacentor variabilis (n = 68) and Ixodes scapularis (n = 15) and blood of their shared rodent host, Peromyscus leucopus (n = 45) to quantify bacterial diversity and concordance. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified from genomic DNA...

Data from: Plant-soil feedbacks shift from negative to positive with decreasing light in forest understory species

Lauren M. Smith & Heather L. Reynolds
Net pairwise plant–soil feedbacks (PSF) may be an important factor structuring plant communities, yet the influence of abiotic context on PSF is not yet understood. Abiotic factors such as light availability can alter plant–soil interactions, potentially resulting in strong context dependence of PSF. Here, we present an experiment in which we measured whole-soil net pairwise feedbacks amongst six common forest understory species across a gradient of light availability. Light treatments were imposed throughout both phases...

Data from: Evolving from static to dynamic signals: evolutionary compensation between two communicative signals

Emilia P. Martins, Alison G. Ossip-Klein, J. Jaime Zúñiga-Vega, Cuauhcihuatl Vital García, Stephanie M. Campos & Diana K. Hews
Signals that convey related information may impose selection on each other, creating evolutionary links between different components of the communicative repertoire. Here, we ask about the consequences of the evolutionary loss of one signal (a colour patch) on another (a motion display) in Sceloporus lizards. We present data on male lizards of four species: two pairs of sister taxa representing two independent evolutionary losses of the static colour patch (S. cozumelae and S. parvus; S....

Data from: Social feedback and the emergence of rank in animal society

Elizabeth A. Hobson & Simon DeDeo
Dominance hierarchies are group-level properties that emerge from the aggression of individuals. Although individuals can gain critical benefits from their position in a hierarchy, we do not understand how real-world hierarchies form. Nor do we understand what signals and decision-rules individuals use to construct and maintain hierarchies in the absence of simple cues such as size or spatial location. A study of conflict in two groups of captive monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) found that a...

Data from: A garter snake transcriptome: pyrosequencing, de novo assembly, and sex-specific differences

Tonia S. Schwartz, Hongseok Tae, Youngik Yang, Keithanne Mockaitis, John L. Van Hemert, Stephen R. Proulx, Jeong-Hyeon Choi & Anne M. Bronikowski
Background: The reptiles, characterized by both diversity and unique evolutionary adaptations, provide a comprehensive system for comparative studies of metabolism, physiology, and development. However, molecular resources for ectothermic reptiles are severely limited, hampering our ability to study the genetic basis for many evolutionarily important traits such as metabolic plasticity, extreme longevity, limblessness, venom, and freeze tolerance. Here we use massively parallel sequencing (454 GS-FLX Titanium) to generate a transcriptome of the western terrestrial garter snake...

Data from: Resources, key traits, and the size of fungal epidemics in Daphnia populations

David J. Civitello, Rachel M. Penczykowski, Aimee N. Smith, Marta S. Shocket, Meghan A. Duffy & Spencer R. Hall
1. Parasites can profoundly affect host populations and ecological communities. Thus, it remains critical to identify mechanisms that drive variation in epidemics. Resource availability can drive epidemics via traits of hosts and parasites that govern disease spread. 2. Here, we map resource–trait–epidemic connections to explain variation in fungal outbreaks (Metschnikowia bicuspidata) in a zooplankton host (Daphnia dentifera) among lakes. We predicted epidemics would grow larger in lakes with more phytoplankton via three energetic mechanisms. First,...

Data from: \"Transcriptome sequencing of the Antarctic Colobanthus quitensis (Kunth) Bartl (Caryophillaceae)\" in Genomic Resources Notes Accepted 1 February 2015 – 31 March 2015

Laura Bertini, Silvia Proietti & Carla Caruso
This article documents the public availability of raw transcriptome sequence data and assembled contigs of the Antarctic plant Colobanthus quitensis grown in two different climatic conditions. BLAST hits are also provided.

Data from: Direct and indirect genetic effects in life history traits of flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum)

Esther D. Ellen, Katrijn Peeters, Merel Verhoeven, Rieta Gols, Jeffrey A. Harvey, Michael J. Wade, Marcel Dicke & Piter Bijma
Indirect genetic effects (IGEs) are the basis of social interactions among conspecifics, and can affect genetic variation of non-social as well as social traits. We used flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum) of two phenotypically distinguishable populations to estimate genetic (co)variances and the effect of IGEs on three life-history traits: development time (DT), growth rate (GR), and pupal body mass (BM). We found that GR was strongly affected by social environment with IGEs accounting for 18% of...

Data from: Experimental evolution: assortative mating and sexual selection, independent of local adaptation, lead to reproductive isolation in the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei

Dean M. Castillo, Melissa K. Burger, Curtis M. Lively & Lynda F. Delph
Using experimental evolution, we investigated the contributions of ecological divergence, sexual selection, and genetic drift to the evolution of reproductive isolation in Caenorhabditis remanei. The nematodes were reared on two different environments for 100 generations. They were assayed for fitness on both environments after 30, 64, and 100 generations, and hybrid fitnesses were analyzed after 64 and 100 generations. Mating propensity within and between populations was also analyzed. The design allowed us to determine whether...

Data from: Decay rates of leaf litters from arbuscular mycorrhizal trees are more sensitive to soil effects than litters from ectomycorrhizal trees

Meghan G. Midgley, Edward Brzostek & Richard P. Phillips
While it is well established that leaf litter decomposition is controlled by climate and substrate quality at broad spatial scales, conceptual frameworks that consider how local-scale factors affect litter decay in heterogeneous landscapes are generally lacking. A critical challenge in disentangling the relative impacts of and interactions among local-scale factors is that these factors frequently covary due to feedbacks between plant and soil communities. For example, forest plots dominated by trees that associate with ectomycorrhizal...

Data from: Adaptive plasticity and niche expansion in an invasive thistle

Kathryn G. Turner, Hélène Fréville & Loren H. Rieseberg
Phenotypic differentiation in size and fecundity between native and invasive populations of a species has been suggested as a causal driver of invasion in plants. Local adaptation to novel environmental conditions through a micro-evolutionary response to natural selection may lead to phenotypic differentiation and fitness advantages in the invaded range. Local adaptation may occur along a stress tolerance trade-off, favoring individuals that, in benign conditions, shift resource allocation from stress tolerance to increased vigor and...

Data from: Spatial soil heterogeneity has a greater effect on symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities and plant growth than genetic modification with Bacillus thuringiensis toxin genes

Tanya E. Cheeke, Ursel M. Schütte, Chris M. Hemmerich, Mitchell B. Cruzan, Todd N. Rosenstiel & James D. Bever
Maize, genetically modified with the insect toxin genes of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), is widely cultivated, yet its impacts on soil organisms are poorly understood. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbiotic associations with plant roots and may be uniquely sensitive to genetic changes within a plant host. In this field study, the effects of nine different lines of Bt maize and their corresponding non-Bt parental isolines were evaluated on AMF colonization and community diversity in plant...

Data from: Detection and polarization of introgression in a five-taxon phylogeny

James B. Pease & Matthew W. Hahn
When multiple speciation events occur rapidly in succession, discordant genealogies due to incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) can complicate the detection of introgression. A variety of methods, including the D-statistic (a.k.a. the “ABBA–BABA test”), have been proposed to infer introgression in the presence of ILS for a four-taxon clade. However, no integrated method exists to detect introgression using allelic patterns for more complex phylogenies. Here we explore the issues associated with previous systems of applying D-statistics...

Data from: Proteome-wide lysine acetylation in cortical astrocytes and alterations that occur during infection with brain parasite Toxoplasma gondii

Anne Bouchut, Aarti R. Chawla, Victoria Jeffers, Andy Hudmon, & William J. Sullivan
Lysine acetylation is a reversible post-translational modification (PTM) that has been detected on thousands of proteins in nearly all cellular compartments. The role of this widespread PTM has yet to be fully elucidated, but can impact protein localization, interactions, activity, and stability. Here we present the first proteome-wide survey of lysine acetylation in cortical astrocytes, a subtype of glia that is a component of the blood-brain barrier and a key regulator of neuronal function and...

Crust-Mantle Interactions during Continental Growth and High-Pressure Rock Exhumation at an Oblique Arc-Continent Collision Zone: SE Caribbean Margin

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Passive array deployment to investigate tectonics of the SE Caribbean region. Array will be a 2D array with USArray scale station spacing covering most of the country of Venezuela.

Data from: \"Transcriptome resources for two highly divergent Silene latifolia populations\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 February 2015 – 31 March 2015

Peter Fields, Laura Weingartner & Lynda Delph
Here we have used next-generation Illumina sequencing to generate transcriptomes of four S. latifolia individuals from two morphologically divergent populations from disparate habitats, including including two females from Xativa, Spain and two males from Zagreb, Croatia. Spanish plants experience a much hotter, drier climate than Croatian plants, and the populations have ecologically relevant differences in floral and leaf characteristics (e.g., Spain has thicker leaves and produces fewer, larger flowers in comparison) (data not shown). This...

Data from: Patterns of domestication in the Ethiopian oil-seed crop Noug (Guizotia abyssinica)

Hannes Dempewolf, Misteru Tesfaye, Abel Teshome, Anne Bjorkman, Rose L. Andrew, Moira Scascitelli, Scott Black, Endashaw Bekele, Johannes M. M. Engels, Quentin C. B. Cronk, Loren H. Rieseberg & Anne D. Bjorkman
Noug (Guizotia abyssinica) is a semi-domesticated oil-seed crop, which is primarily cultivated in Ethiopia. Unlike its closest crop relative, sunflower, noug has small seeds, small flowering heads, many branches, many flowering heads, indeterminate flowering, and it shatters in the field. Here we conducted common garden studies and microsatellite analyses of genetic variation to test whether high levels of crop-wild gene flow and/or unfavorable phenotypic correlations have hindered noug domestication. With the exception of one population,...

Data from: The evolution of reduced antagonism – a role for host-parasite coevolution

Amanda Kyle Gibson, Kayla S. Stoy, Ian A. Gelarden, McKenna J. Penley, Curtis M. Lively & Levi T. Morran
Why do some host-parasite interactions become less antagonistic over evolutionary time? Vertical transmission can select for reduced antagonism. Vertical transmission also promotes coevolution between hosts and parasites. Therefore, we hypothesized that coevolution itself may underlie transitions to reduced antagonism. To test the coevolution hypothesis, we selected for reduced antagonism between the host Caenorhabditis elegans and its parasite Serratia marcescens. This parasite is horizontally transmitted, which allowed us to study coevolution independently of vertical transmission. After...

Data from: The agonistic adrenal: melatonin elicits female aggression via regulation of adrenal androgens

Nikki M. Rendon, Lauren M. Rudolph, Dale R. Sengelaub & Gregory E. Demas
Classic findings have demonstrated an important role for sex steroids as regulators of aggression, but this relationship is lacking within some environmental contexts. In mammals and birds, the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a non-gonadal precursor of biologically active steroids, has been linked to aggression. Although females, like males, use aggression when competing for limited resources, the mechanisms underlying female aggression remain understudied. Here, we propose a previously undescribed endocrine mechanism regulating female aggression via direct...

Data from: \"Development of the draft genome sequence of the marbled flounder Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae as a reference of population genomic analysis\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 February 2015 – 31 March 2015

Yuki Minegishi, Minoru Ikeda, Lynda F. Delph, Laura A. Weingartner, Peter D. Fields, Laura Bertini, Carla Caruso, Silvia Proietti, Wolfgang Arthofer, Francesco Cicconardi, Heike Ritthammer, Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner, Florian M. Steiner, Gregor A. Wachter & Herbert C. Wagner
This article documents the public availability of the draft genome sequence data (raw reads, assembled contigs and unassembled reads) and RAD-tag read data of the marbled flounder Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae (Pleuronectiformes; Pleuronectidae).

Data from: \"A reduced representation libraries approach for nuclear marker development via 454 sequencing applied on Tetramorium (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)\" in Genomic Resources Notes Accepted 1 February 2015 to 31 March 2015

Herbert C. Wagner, Francesco Cicconardi, Gregor A. Wachter, Heike Ritthammer, Florian M. Steiner, Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner & Wolfgang Arthofer
To clarify species boundaries in the cryptic Tetramorium caespitum/impurum ant species complex, a multi-disciplinary approach is necessary. Nuclear DNA markers constitute one important step in species delimitation. We established a reduced representation library (RRL) based on amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP) PCR products of four species. Amplicons were size-selected by gel-electrophoresis, DNA-fragments recovered from the agarose gels, and 454 libraries constructed by a commercial provider. Pyrosequencing yielded 490,155 reads, from which we designed cross-species amplifying primer...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    21

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    21

Affiliations

  • Indiana University Bloomington
    20
  • Tuscia University
    3
  • University of Innsbruck
    3
  • Tohoku University
    2
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    2
  • University of British Columbia
    2
  • Rice University
    1
  • Indiana State University
    1
  • New Mexico State University
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1