26 Works

Data from: Spatiotemporal dynamics of Puumala hantavirus associated with its rodent host, Myodes glareolus

Vanessa Weber De Melo, Hanan Sheik Ali, Jona Freise, Denise Kühnert, Sandra Essbauer, Marc Mertens, Konrad M. Wanka, Stephan Drewes, Rainer G. Ulrich, Gerald Heckel & Hanan Sheikh Ali
Many viruses significantly impact human and animal health. Understanding the population dynamics of these viruses and their hosts can provide important insights for epidemiology and virus evolution. Puumala virus (PUUV) is a European hantavirus that may cause regional outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. Here, we analyzed the spatiotemporal dynamics of PUUV circulating in local populations of its rodent reservoir host, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus) during eight years. Phylogenetic and population...

Data from: The population genomics of rapid adaptation: disentangling signatures of selection and demography in white sands lizards

Stefan Laurent, Susanne P. Pfeifer, Matthew Settles, Samuel S. Hunter, Kayla M. Hardwick, Louise Ormond, Vitor C. Sousa, Jeffrey D. Jensen, Erica Bree Rosenblum & Matthew L. Settles
Understanding the process of adaptation during rapid environmental change remains one of the central focal points of evolutionary biology. The recently formed White Sands system of southern New Mexico offers an outstanding example of rapid adaptation, with a variety of species having rapidly evolved blanched forms on the dunes that contrast with their close relatives in the surrounding dark soil habitat. In this study, we focus on two of the White Sands lizard species, Sceloporus...

Data from: Benefits of coloniality: communal defence saves anti-predator effort in cooperative breeders

Arne Jungwirth, Dario Josi, Jonas Walker & Michael Taborsky
1. Many anti-predator benefits of group living are predicted to scale with prey density. Nevertheless, evidence for a general density-dependent increase of prey survival is scarce. A possible reason for this discrepancy is the reduction of costly anti-predator behaviour of prey with increasing density, which may offset density-dependent survival gains. Benefits of group living might hence accrue by saved investment into anti-predator behaviours rather than by increased survival rates. 2. Here, we experimentally presented predators...

Data from: Continuous theta burst stimulation over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex decreases medium load working memory performance in healthy humans

Nathalie Schicktanz, Matthias Fastenrath, Annette Milnik, Klara Spalek, Bianca Auschra, Thomas Nyffeler, Andreas Papassotiropoulos, Dominique J.-F. De Quervain & Kyrill Schwegler
The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) plays a key role in working memory. Evidence indicates that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the DLPFC can interfere with working memory performance. Here we investigated for how long continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) over the DLPFC decreases working memory performance and whether the effect of cTBS on performance depends on working memory load. Forty healthy young subjects received either cTBS over the left DLPFC or sham stimulation before performing a...

Data from: Using plant functional traits and phylogenies to understand patterns of plant community assembly in a seasonal tropical forest in Lao PDR

Manichanh Satdichanh, Jérôme Millet, Andreas Heinimann, Khamseng Nanthavong & Rhett D. Harrison
Plant functional traits reflect different evolutionary responses to environmental variation, and among extant species determine the outcomes of interactions between plants and their environment, including other plant species. Thus, combining phylogenetic and trait-based information can be a powerful approach for understanding community assembly processes across a range of spatial scales. We used this approach to investigate tree community composition at Phou Khao Khouay National Park (18°14’-18°32’N; 102°38’- 102°59’E), Laos, where several distinct forest types occur...

Data from: Ejaculate characteristics depend on social environment in the horse (Equus caballus)

Dominik Burger, Guillaume Dolivo & Claus Wedekind
Sperm competition theory predicts semen characteristics to be affected by the social environment. We used the polygamous horse (Equus caballus) to experimentally study within-subject plasticity in response to different social environments. Stallions were sequentially exposed, over a period of 8 weeks each, to other stallions and then singly to mares, or vice versa (in adjacent boxes separated by grills). Ejaculates were collected to determine semen characteristics. Highest sperm numbers were found in stallions that were...

Data from: Hybrid ‘superswarm’ leads to rapid divergence and establishment of populations during a biological invasion

Denis Roy, Kay Lucek, Ryan P. Walter & Ole Seehausen
Understanding the genetic background of invading species can be crucial information clarifying why they become invasive. Intraspecific genetic admixture among lineages separated in the native ranges may promote the rate and extent of an invasion by substantially increasing standing genetic variation. Here, we examined the genetic relationships among threespine stickleback that recently colonized Switzerland. This invasion results from several distinct genetic lineages that colonized multiple locations and have since undergone range expansions, where they coexist...

Data from: Bat species comparisons based on external morphology: a test of traditional versus geometric morphometric approaches

Daniela A. Schmieder, Hugo A. Benítez, Ivailo M. Borissov & Carmelo Fruciano
External morphology is commonly used to identify bats as well as to investigate flight and foraging behavior, typically relying on simple length and area measures or ratios. However, geometric morphometrics is increasingly used in the biological sciences to analyse variation in shape and discriminate among species and populations. Here we compare the ability of traditional versus geometric morphometric methods in discriminating between closely related bat species – in this case European horseshoe bats (Rhinolophidae, Chiroptera)...

Data from: Hippocampus is place of interaction between unconscious and conscious memories

Marc Alain Züst, Patrizio Colella, Thomas Peter Reber, Patrik Vuilleumier, Martinus Hauf, Simon Ruch & Katharina Henke
Recent evidence suggests that humans can form and later retrieve new semantic relations unconsciously by way of hippocampus—the key structure also recruited for conscious relational (episodic) memory. If the hippocampus subserves both conscious and unconscious relational encoding/retrieval, one would expect the hippocampus to be place of unconscious-conscious interactions during memory retrieval. We tested this hypothesis in an fMRI experiment probing the interaction between the unconscious and conscious retrieval of face-associated information. For the establishment of...

Data from: Mining microsatellite markers from public expressed sequence tags databases for the study of threatened plants

Lua Lopez, Rodolfo Barreiro, Markus Fischer & Marcus A. Koch
Background: Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) are widely used in population genetic studies but their classical development is costly and time-consuming. The ever-increasing available DNA datasets generated by high-throughput techniques offer an inexpensive alternative for SSRs discovery. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) have been widely used as SSR source for plants of economic relevance but their application to non-model species is still modest. Methods: Here, we explored the use of publicly available ESTs (GenBank at the National...

Data from: Evaluating genomic divergence and parallelism in replicate ecomorphs from young and old cichlid adaptive radiations

Matthew D. McGee, Russell Y. Neches & Ole Seehausen
Comparative genomic studies of closely related species typically focus on single species pairs at one given stage of divergence. That makes it difficult to infer the continuum of evolutionary process during speciation and beyond. Here, we use whole-genome resequencing to examine genomic patterns of divergence in three sympatric cichlid species pairs with very similar functional and ecological differentiation, but different ages. We find a strong signature of increasing genomic divergence with time in both the...

Data from: First- and second-order sociality determine survival and reproduction in cooperative cichlids

Arne Jungwirth & Michael Taborsky
Cooperative breeders are model organisms for the study of cooperation. The costs and benefits involved in cooperation are typically scrutinised only at the group level. However, multi-level social organisations, involving interactions among individuals at various levels, are often observed. To understand the adaptive value of cooperation and the evolution of complex social organisation, the importance of different levels of social organisation for direct and indirect fitness components should be identified. Here we show that in...

Data from: Low but contrasting neutral genetic differentiation shaped by winter temperature in European great tits

Mélissa Lemoine, Kay Lucek, Charles Perrier, Verena Saladin, Frank Adriaensen, Emilio Barba, Eduardo J. Belda, Anne Charmantier, Mariusz Cichon, Eeva Tapio, Arnaud Gregoire, Camilla A. Hinde, Arild Johnsen, Jan Komdeur, Raivo Mand, Erik Matthysen, Ana Claudia Norte, Natalia Pitala, Ben C. Sheldon, Tore Slagsvold, Joost M. Tinbergen, Janos Torok, Richard Ubels, Kees Van Oers, Marcel E. Visser … & Tapio Eeva
Gene flow is usually thought to reduce genetic divergence and impede local adaptation by homogenising gene pools between populations. However, evidence for local adaptation and phenotypic differentiation in highly mobile species, experiencing high levels of gene flow, is emerging. Assessing population genetic structure at different spatial scales is thus a crucial step towards understanding mechanisms underlying intraspecific differentiation and diversification. Here, we studied the population genetic structure of a highly mobile species – the great...

Data from: Reproductive performance of a declining forest passerine in relation to environmental and social factors: implications for species conservation

Alexander Grendelmeier, Raphaël Arlettaz, Michael Gerber, Gilberto Pasinelli & Alex Grendelmeier
Identifying factors influencing a species’ ecological niche and demography is a prerequisite for species conservation. However, our understanding of the interplay between demographic rates and biotic/abiotic factors is still poor for most species of conservation concern. We evaluated relevance of eight hypotheses relating to timing of breeding, temporal nest exposure, nest concealment, topography, tree structure, predation risk and disturbance, density dependence and weather for explaining variation in reproductive performance of the declining wood warbler Phylloscopus...

Data from: Genome-Wide Analyses Suggest Mechanisms Involving Early B-Cell Development in Canine IgA Deficiency

Mia Olsson, Katarina Tengvall, Marcel Frankowiack, Marcin Kierczak, Kerstin Bergvall, Erik Axelsson, Linda Tintle, Eliane Marti, Petra Roosje, Tosso Leeb, Åke Hedhammar, Lennart Hammarström & Kerstin Lindblad-Toh
Immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immune deficiency disorder in both humans and dogs, characterized by recurrent mucosal tract infections and a predisposition for allergic and other immune mediated diseases. In several dog breeds, low IgA levels have been observed at a high frequency and with a clinical resemblance to human IgAD. In this study, we used genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify genomic regions associated with low IgA levels in dogs...

Data from: Species richness, but not phylogenetic diversity, influences community biomass production and temporal stability in a re-examination of 16 grassland biodiversity studies

Patrick Venail, Kevin Gross, Todd H. Oakley, Anita Narwani, Eric Allan, Pedro Flombaum, Forest Isbell, Jasmin Joshi, Peter B. Reich, David Tilman, Jasper Van Ruijven & Bradley J. Cardinale
1.Hundreds of experiments have now manipulated species richness of various groups of organisms and examined how this aspect of biological diversity influences ecosystem functioning. Ecologists have recently expanded this field to look at whether phylogenetic diversity among species, often quantified as the sum of branch lengths on a molecular phylogeny leading to all species in a community, also predicts ecological function. Some have hypothesized that phylogenetic divergence should be a superior predictor of ecological function...

Worldwide evidence of a unimodal relationship between productivity and plant species richness

Lauchlan H. Fraser, Jason Pither, Anke Jentsch, Marcelo Sternberg, Martin Zobel, Diana Askarizadeh, Sandor Bartha, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Jonathan A. Bennett, Alex Bittel, Bazartseren Boldgiv, Ilsi I. Boldrini, Edward Bork, Leslie Brown, Marcelo Cabido, James Cahill, Cameron N. Carlyle, Giandiego Campetella, Stefano Chelli, Ofer Cohen, Anna-Maria Csergo, Sandra Diaz, Lucas Enrico, David Ensing, Alessandra Fidelis … & Szilárd Szentes
The search for predictions of species diversity across environmental gradients has challenged ecologists for decades. The humped-back model (HBM) suggests that plant diversity peaks at intermediate productivity; at low productivity few species can tolerate the environmental stresses, and at high productivity a few highly competitive species dominate. Over time the HBM has become increasingly controversial, and recent studies claim to have refuted it. Here, by using data from coordinated surveys conducted throughout grasslands worldwide and...

Data from: The effect of brain size evolution on feeding propensity, digestive efficiency and juvenile growth

Alexander Kotrschal, Alberto Corral-Lopez, Sönke Szidat & Niclas Kolm
One key hypothesis in the study of brain size evolution is the expensive tissue hypothesis; the idea that increased investment into the brain should be compensated by decreased investment into other costly organs, for instance the gut. While the hypothesis is supported by both comparative and experimental evidence, little is known about the potential changes in energetic requirements or digestive traits following such evolutionary shifts in brain and gut size. Organisms may meet the greater...

Data from: Ecologically dependent and intrinsic genetic signatures of postzygotic isolation between sympatric host races of the leaf beetle Lochmaea capreae

Shaghayegh Soudi, Klaus Reinhold & Leif Engqvist
The fitness of hybrids might be compromised as a result of intrinsic isolation and/or because they fall between ecological niches due to their intermediate phenotypes (“extrinsic isolation”). Here, we present data from several crosses (parental crosses, F1, F2 and backcrosses) between the two host races of Lochmaea capreae on willow and birch to test for extrinsic isolation, intrinsic isolation, and environmentally dependent genetic incompatibilities. We employed a reciprocal transplant design in which offspring were raised...

Data from: Additive genetic variance and effects of inbreeding, sex and age on heterophil to lymphocyte ratio in song sparrows

Sylvain Losdat, Peter Arcese, Laura Sampson, Nacho Villar & Jane M. Reid
1. Physiological traits can influence individual fitness and evolutionary changes in stress-related physiological traits have been hypothesized to mediate the evolution of life-history traits and trade-offs. The hypothesis that such physiological variation could drive ongoing life-history evolution requires non-zero additive genetic variance in individual stress-related physiological traits. However, the magnitude of genetic and environmental components of phenotypic variation in stress-related physiological traits has not been estimated in fully developed vertebrates under natural environmental conditions. 2....

Data from: Simple measures of climate, soil properties and plant traits predict national scale grassland soil carbon stocks

Peter Manning, Franciska T. De Vries, Jerry R. B. Tallowin, Roger Smith, Simon R. Mortimer, Emma S. Pilgrim, Kate A. Harrison, Daniel G. Wright, Helen Quirk, Joseph Benson, Bill Shipley, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen, Jens Kattge, Gerhard Bönisch, Christian Wirth & Richard D. Bardgett
1. Soil carbon (C) storage is a key ecosystem service. Soil C stocks play a vital role in soil fertility and climate regulation, but the factors that control these stocks at regional and national scales are unknown, particularly when their composition and stability are considered. As a result, their mapping relies on either unreliable proxy measures or laborious direct measurements. 2. Using data from an extensive national survey of English grasslands, we show that surface...

Data from: Limitation of seedling growth by potassium and magnesium supply for two ectomycorrhizal tree species of a Central African rain forest and its implication for their recruitment

Godlove Ambe Neba, David McClintock Newbery & George Bindeh Chuyong
In the ectomycorrhizal caesalpiniaceous groves of southern Korup National Park, the dominant tree species, Microberlinia bisulcata, displays very poor in situ recruitment compared with its codominant, Tetraberlinia bifoliolata. The reported ex situ experiment tested whether availabilities of soil potassium and magnesium play a role. Seedlings of the two species received applications of K and Mg fertilizer in potted native soil in a local shade house, and their responses in terms of growth and nutrient concentrations...

Data from: Selection for costly sexual traits results in a vacant mating niche and male dimorphism

Frederik Hendrickx, Bram Vanthournout & Michael Taborsky
The expected strong directional selection for traits that increase a male's mating ability conflicts with the frequent observation that within species, males may show extreme variation in sexual traits. These male reproductive polymorphisms are usually attributed to direct male-male competition. It is currently unclear, however, how directional selection for sexually selected traits may convert into disruptive selection, and if female preference for elaborate traits may be an alternative mechanism driving the evolution of male polymorphism....

Data from: Female MHC type affects male testosterone levels and sperm number in the horse (Equus caballus)

Dominik Burger, Guillaume Dolivo, Eliane Marti, Harald Sieme & Claus Wedekind
Odours of vertebrates often contain information about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and are used in kin recognition, mate choice or female investment in pregnancy. It is, however, still unclear whether MHC-linked signals can also affect male reproductive strategies. We used horses (Equus caballus) to study this question under experimental conditions. Twelve stallions were individually exposed either to an unfamiliar MHC-similar mare and then to an unfamiliar MHC-dissimilar mare, or vice versa. Each exposure lasted...

Data from: Anatomical atlas of the quail's ear (Coturnix coturnix)

Anna Bonsmann, Michael H. Stoffel, Markus Burkhart, Jean-Michel Hatt & J.-M. Hatt
This study aims to enhance the anatomical knowledge of the ear of the adult quail (Coturnix coturnix) through the creation of a scaled 3D model utilizing data from micro-CT images. In addition, 17 annotated histological sections of the quail's ear are aligned to their 3D position in the model. The resulting anatomical atlas provides an intuitive insight into the 3D anatomy and can be used for medical education. The model also allows measuring anatomical structures...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    26

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    26

Affiliations

  • University of Bern
    26
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    3
  • University of Manchester
    3
  • Uppsala University
    3
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    2
  • University of Lausanne
    2
  • University of Geneva
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    2
  • Karolinska Institute
    2