39 Works

Data from: Integration of two herbivore-induced plant volatiles results in synergistic effects on plant defense and resistance

Lingfei Hu, Meng Ye & Matthias Erb
Plants can use induced volatiles to detect herbivore‐ and pathogen‐attacked neighbors and prime their defenses. Several individual volatile priming cues have been identified, but whether plants are able to integrate multiple cues from stress‐related volatile blends remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated how maize plants respond to two herbivore‐induced volatile priming cues with complementary information content, the green leaf volatile (Z)‐3‐hexenyl acetate (HAC) and the aromatic volatile indole. In the absence of herbivory, HAC directly...

Data from: Non-linear effects of phylogenetic distance on early-stage establishment of experimentally introduced plants in grassland communities

Eva Maria Malecore, Wayne Dawson, Anne Kempel, Gregor Müller & Mark Van Kleunen
1. The phylogenetic distance of an introduced plant species to a resident native community may play a role in determining its establishment success. While Darwin’s naturalization hypothesis predicts a positive relationship, the preadaptation hypothesis predicts a negative relationship. Rigorous tests of this now so-called Darwin’s naturalization conundrum require not only information on establishment successes but also of failures, which is frequently not available. Such essential information, however, can be provided by experimental introductions. 2. Here,...

Data from: Impacts of species richness on productivity in a large-scale subtropical forest experiment

Yuanyuan Huang, Yuxin Chen, Nadia Castro-Izaguirre, Martin Baruffol, Matteo Brezzi, Anne Lang, Ying Li, Werner Härdtle, Werner Von Oheimb, Xuefeu Yang, Xiaojuan Liu, Kequan Pei, Sabine Both, Bo Yang, David Eichenberg, Thorsten Assmann, Jürgen Bauhus, Thorsten Behrens, François Buscot, Xiao-Yong Chen, Douglas Chester, Bing-Yang Ding, Walter Durka, Alexandra Erfmeier, Jingyun Fang … & Bernhard Schmid
Biodiversity experiments have shown that species loss reduces ecosystem functioning in grassland. To test whether this result can be extrapolated to forests, the main contributors to terrestrial primary productivity, requires large-scale experiments. We manipulated tree species richness by planting more than 150,000 trees in plots with 1 to 16 species. Simulating multiple extinction scenarios, we found that richness strongly increased stand-level productivity. After 8 years, 16-species mixtures had accumulated over twice the amount of carbon...

Data from: Divergent parasite infections in sympatric cichlid species in Lake Victoria

Anssi Karvonen, Catherine E. Wagner, Oliver M. Selz & Ole Seehausen
Parasitism has been proposed as a factor in host speciation, as an agent affecting coexistence of host species in species rich communities, and as a driver of post-speciation diversification. Young adaptive radiations of closely related host species of varying ecological and genomic differentiation provide interesting opportunities to explore interactions between patterns of parasitism, divergence and coexistence of sympatric host species. Here, we explored patterns in ectoparasitism in a community of 16 fully sympatric cichlid species...

Data from: Exposure to predators does not lead to the evolution of larger brains in experimental populations of threespine stickleback

Kieran Samuk, Jan Xue, Diana Jessie Rennison & Diana J. Rennision
Natural selection is often invoked to explain differences in brain size among vertebrates. However, the particular agents of selection that shape brain size variation remain obscure. Recent studies suggest that predators may select for larger brains because increased cognitive and sensory abilities allow prey to better elude predators. Yet, there is little direct evidence that exposure to predators causes the evolution of larger brains in prey species. We experimentally tested this prediction by exposing families...

Data from: Divergent brain gene expression profiles between alternative behavioural helper types in a cooperative breeder

Claudia Kasper, Francois Olivier Hebert, Nadia Aubin-Horth & Barbara Taborsky
Juveniles of the cooperatively-breeding cichlid fish Neolamprologus pulcher either consistently provide help in form of alloparental egg care ('cleaners') or consistently abstain from helping ('non-cleaners'). These phenotypes are not based on heritable genetic differences. Instead they arise during ontogeny, which should lead to differences in brain structure or physiology, a currently untested prediction. We compared brain gene expression profiles of cleaners and non-cleaners in two experimental conditions, a helping opportunity and a control condition. We...

Data from: Intransitive competition is common across five major taxonomic groups and is driven by productivity, competitive rank and functional traits.

Santiago Soliveres, Anika Lehmann, Steffen Boch, Florian Altermatt, Francesco Carrara, Thomas W. Crowther, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, Anne Kempel, Daniel S. Maynard, Matthias C. Rillig, Brajesh K. Singh, Pankaj Trivedi & Eric Allan
1. Competition can be fully hierarchical or intransitive, and this degree of hierarchy is driven by multiple factors, including environmental conditions, the functional traits of the species involved or the topology of competition networks. Studies simultaneously analyzing these drivers of competition hierarchy are rare. Additionally, organisms compete either directly or via interference competition for resources or space, within a local neighbourhood or across the habitat. Therefore, the drivers of competition could change accordingly and depend...

Data from: Higher flight activity in the offspring of migrants compared to residents in a migratory insect

Laura J. Dällenbach, Alexandra Glauser, Ka S. Lim, Jason W. Chapman & Myles H. M. Menz
Migration has evolved among many animal taxa and migratory species are found across all major lineages. Insects are the most abundant and diverse terrestrial migrants, with trillions of animals migrating annually. Partial migration, where populations consist of resident and migratory individuals, is ubiquitous among many taxa. However, the underlying mechanisms are relatively poorly understood and may be driven by physiological, behavioural or genetic variation within populations. We investigated the differences in migratory tendency between migratory...

Data from: The scent of attractiveness: levels of reproductive hormones explain individual differences in women’s body odour

Janek Lobmaier, Urs Fischbacher, Urs Wirthmüller, Daria Knoch & Janek S. Lobmaier
Individuals are thought to have their own distinctive body odour which reportedly plays an important role in mate choice. In the present study we investigated individual differences in body odours of women and examined whether some women generally smell more attractive than others or whether odour preferences are a matter of individual taste. We then explored whether levels of reproductive hormones explain women’s body odour attractiveness, to test the idea that body odour attractiveness may...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Data from: Projecting shifts in thermal habitat for 686 species on the North American continental shelf

James W. Morley, Rebecca L. Selden, Robert J. Latour, Thomas L. Froelicher, Richard J. Seagraves, Malin L. Pinsky & Thomas L. Frölicher
Recent shifts in the geographic distribution of marine species have been linked to shifts in preferred thermal habitats. These shifts in distribution have already posed challenges for living marine resource management, and there is a strong need for projections of how species might be impacted by future changes in ocean temperatures during the 21st century. We modeled thermal habitat for 686 marine species in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans using long-term ecological survey data from...

Data from: Comparative phylogeography biogeography of forest-dependent mammals reveals paleo-forest corridors throughout Sundaland

Victor C. Mason, Kristofer M. Helgen & William J. Murphy
The evolutionary history of the colugo, a gliding arboreal mammal distributed throughout Sundaland, was influenced by the location of and connections between forest habitats. By comparing colugo phylogenetic patterns, species ecology, sample distributions, and times of divergence to those of other Sundaic taxa with different life history traits and dispersal capabilities, we inferred the probable distribution of paleo-forest corridors. We identified a consistent pattern of early diversification between east and west Bornean lineages in colugos,...

Data from: The importance of individual heterogeneity for interpreting faecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels in wildlife studies

Joy Coppes, Jim-Lino Kämmerle, Mirjam Willert, Annette Kohnen, Rupert Palme & Veronika Braunisch
1. Being a non-invasive and inexpensive method, the analysis of faecal corticosteroid metabolites (FCM) is increasingly being applied in wildlife research. Various environmental factors have been shown to influence FCM levels, but most studies did not account for inter-individual variance, which we hypothesized may substantially affect the results. 2. We combined FCM analysis with genetic analysis to identify the sex and individual of samples collected in three consecutive winters, with repeated samples per individual, across...

Data from: Applying generalised allometric regressions to predict live body mass of tropical and temperate arthropods

Esra H. Sohlström, Lucas Marian, Andrew D. Barnes, Noor F. Haneda, Stefan Scheu, Björn C. Rall, Ulrich Brose & Malte Jochum
1. The ecological implications of body size extend from the biology of individual organisms to ecosystem–level processes. Measuring body mass for high numbers of invertebrates can be logistically challenging, making length-mass regressions useful for predicting body mass with minimal effort. However, standardised sets of scaling relationships covering a large range in body length, taxonomic groups, and multiple geographical regions are scarce. 2. We collected 6212 arthropods from 19 higher-level taxa in both temperate and tropical...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    39

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    39

Affiliations

  • University of Bern
    39
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    6
  • University of Freiburg
    4
  • University of Zurich
    3
  • University of Exeter
    3
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    2
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • University of Wyoming
    2
  • University of Toulouse
    2
  • Texas A&M University
    2