12 Works

Data from: Testing applied nucleation as a strategy to facilitate tropical forest recovery

Rakan A. Zahawi, Karen D. Holl, Rebecca J. Cole & J. Leighton Reid
Active forest restoration typically involves planting trees over large areas; this practice is costly, however, and establishing homogeneous plantations may favour the recruitment of a particular suite of species and strongly influence the successional trajectory. An alternative approach is to plant nuclei (islands) of trees to simulate the nucleation model of succession and accelerate natural recovery. We evaluated natural tree recruitment over 4 years in a restoration study replicated at eight former pasture sites in...

Tropical mammal functional diversity increases with productivity but decreases with anthropogenic disturbance

Daniel Gorczynski, Chia Hsieh, Jadelys Tonos Luciano, Jorge Ahumada, Santiago Espinosa, Steig Johnson, Francesco Rovero, Fernanda Santos, Mahandry Hugues Andrianarisoa, Johanna Hurtado Astaiza, Patrick A. Jansen, Charles Kayijamahe, Marcela Guimarães Moreira Lima, Julia Salvador & Lydia Beaudrot
A variety of factors can affect the biodiversity of tropical mammal communities, but their relative importance and directionality remain uncertain. Previous global investigations of mammal functional diversity have relied on range maps instead of observational data to determine community composition. We test the effects of species pools, habitat heterogeneity, primary productivity and human disturbance on the functional diversity (dispersion and richness) of mammal communities using the largest standardized tropical forest camera trap monitoring system, the...

Data from: Scale-dependent effects of forest restoration on Neotropical fruit bats

J. Leighton Reid, Chase D. Mendenhall, Rakan A. Zahawi & Karen D. Holl
Neotropical fruit bats (family Phyllostomidae) facilitate forest regeneration on degraded lands by dispersing shrub and tree seeds. Accordingly, if fruit bats can be attracted to restoration sites, seed dispersal could be enhanced. We surveyed bat communities at 10 sites in southern Costa Rica to evaluate whether restoration treatments attracted more fruit bats if trees were planted on degraded farmlands in plantations or island configurations versus natural regeneration. We also compared the relative influence of tree...

Data from: Leaf litter arthropod responses to tropical forest restoration

Rebecca J. Cole, Karen D. Holl, Rakan A. Zahawi, Philipp Wickey & Alan R. Townsend
Soil and litter arthropods represent a large proportion of tropical biodiversity and perform important ecosystem functions, but little is known about the efficacy of different tropical forest restoration strategies in facilitating their recovery in degraded habitats. We sampled arthropods in four 7‐ to 8‐year‐old restoration treatments and in nearby reference forests. Sampling was conducted during the wet and dry seasons using extractions from litter and pitfall samples. Restoration treatments were replicated in 50 × 50‐m...

Bird Frugivore Abundance data from: Applied nucleation facilitates tropical forest recovery

Karen D. Holl, J. Leighton Reid, Rebecca J. Cole, Federico Oviedo‐Brenes, Juan A. Rosales & Rakan A. Zahawi
Applied nucleation, mostly based upon planting tree islands, has been proposed as a cost‐effective strategy to meet ambitious global forest and landscape restoration targets. We review results from a 15‐year study, replicated at 15 sites in southern Costa Rica, that compares applied nucleation to natural regeneration and mixed‐species tree plantations as strategies to restore tropical forest. We have collected data on planted tree survival and growth, woody vegetation recruitment and structure, seed rain, litterfall, epiphytes,...

Data from: Reduced aboveground tree growth associated with higher arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal diversity in tropical forest restoration

Ellen K. Holste, Karen D. Holl, Rakan A. Zahawi & Richard K. Kobe
Establishing diverse mycorrhizal fungal communities is considered important for forest recovery, yet mycorrhizae may have complex effects on tree growth depending on the composition of fungal species present. In an effort to understand the role of mycorrhizal fungi community in forest restoration in southern Costa Rica, we sampled the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) community across eight sites that were planted with the same species (Inga edulis, Erythrina poeppigiana, Terminalia amazonia, and Vochysia guatemalensis) but varied...

Data from: Effects of dispersal‐ and niche‐based factors on tree recruitment in tropical wet forest restoration

Leland K. Werden, Karen D. Holl, Juan Abel Rosales, Janelle M. Sylvester & Rakan A. Zahawi
Both dispersal‐ and niche‐based factors can impose major barriers on tree establishment. Our understanding of how these factors interact to determine recruitment rates is based primarily on findings from mature tropical forests, despite the fact that a majority of tropical forests are now secondary. Consequently, factors influencing seed limitation and the seed‐to‐seedling transition (STS) in disturbed landscapes, and how those factors shift during succession, are not well understood. We used a 3.5‐yr record of seed...

Highly-replicated soil, topography and vegetation sampling across an old-growth tropical rain forest landscape

David Clark, Deborah Clark, Leonel Campos Otoya, William Miranda Conejo & Orlando Vargas Ramirez
Here we present data from highly-replicated sampling of soil, topography, and vegetation across an old-growth tropical rainforest landscape at the La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Samples were taken at 100 x 50 m spacing using an existing surveyed grid system. The 573-ha sample area spanned a variety of soil, topographic and vegetation conditions, including flat terraces on old alluvial soil, ridge tops and steep slopes on residual soil, riparian habitats and fresh-water swamps. At...

Data from: Local tropical forest restoration strategies affect tree recruitment more strongly than does landscape forest cover

Karen D. Holl, John Leighton Reid, José Miguel Chaves-Fallas, Federico Oviedo-Brenes & Rakan A. Zahawi
Developing restoration strategies that accelerate natural successional processes and are resource‐efficient is critical to facilitating tropical forest recovery across millions of hectares of deforested lands in the tropics. We compared tree recruitment after a decade in three restoration treatments (natural regeneration, applied nucleation/island tree planting and plantation) and nearby reference forest in the premontane rain forest zone in southern Costa Rica. The study was replicated at 13 sites with a range of surrounding forest cover,...

Canopy cover data from: Applied nucleation facilitates tropical forest recovery

Karen D. Holl, J. Leighton Reid, Rebecca J. Cole, Federico Oviedo‐Brenes, Juan A. Rosales & Rakan A. Zahawi
Applied nucleation, mostly based upon planting tree islands, has been proposed as a cost‐effective strategy to meet ambitious global forest and landscape restoration targets. We review results from a 15‐year study, replicated at 15 sites in southern Costa Rica, that compares applied nucleation to natural regeneration and mixed‐species tree plantations as strategies to restore tropical forest. We have collected data on planted tree survival and growth, woody vegetation recruitment and structure, seed rain, litterfall, epiphytes,...

Data from: Rules of thumb for predicting tropical forest recovery

Karen D. Holl, John Leighton Reid, Federico Oviedo-Brenes, Andy J. Kulikowski & Rakan A. Zahawi
Natural regeneration is increasingly recognized as a potentially cost‐effective strategy to reach ambitious forest landscape restoration targets, but rates of recovery are notoriously variable. We asked how well initial habitat conditions after cessation of agriculture predict forest recovery after nearly a decade. We aimed to provide land managers with general rules of thumb to assess when it is necessary to invest resources in active restoration, such as tree planting, to accelerate forest recovery. Location: Coto...

Data from: Tropical forest restoration enriches vascular epiphyte recovery

John Leighton Reid, José Miguel Chaves-Fallas, Karen D. Holl & Rakan A. Zahawi
Vascular epiphytes constitute a large proportion of tropical forest plant biodiversity, but are among the slowest plants to recolonize secondary forests. We asked whether tree planting for ecological restoration accelerates epiphyte community recovery. Does the spatial configuration of tree planting matter? What landscape contexts are most suitable for epiphyte restoration? Location: Restored pastures in premontane Coto Brus County, Puntarenas, Costa Rica.

Registration Year

  • 2022
    1
  • 2021
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Organization For Tropical Studies
    12
  • University of California, Santa Cruz
    10
  • Missouri Botanical Garden
    3
  • Virginia Tech
    2
  • University of Costa Rica
    2
  • Autonomous University of San Luis Potosí
    1
  • Rice University
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi
    1
  • Université Libre de Bruxelles
    1