28 Works

Data from: Intraspecific variation in cephalopod conchs changes during ontogeny: perspectives from three-dimensional morphometry of Nautilus pompilius

Amane Tajika, Naoki Morimoto, Ryoji Wani & Christian Klug
Intraspecific variation of organisms is of great importance to correctly carry out taxonomic work, which is a prerequisite for important disciplines in paleontology such as community paleoecology, biostratigraphy, and biogeography. However, intraspecific variation is rarely studied in ectocochleate cephalopods (ammonoids and nautiloids), in which an excessive number of taxa were established during the past centuries. Since intraspecific variation of fossilized organisms suffers from various biases (time averaging and taphonomy), an extant example is needed for...

Data from: Postural control during quiet bipedal standing in rats

Tetsuro Funato, Yota Sato, Soichiro Fujiki, Yamato Sato, Shinya Aoi, Kazuo Tsuchiya & Dai Yanagihara
The control of bipedal posture in humans is subject to non-ideal conditions such as delayed sensation and heartbeat noise. However, the controller achieves a high level of functionality by utilizing body dynamics dexterously. In order to elucidate the neural mechanism responsible for postural control, the present study made use of an experimental setup involving rats because they have more accessible neural structures. The experimental design requires rats to stand bipedally in order to obtain a...

Data from: The evolution of between-species reproductive interference capability under different within-species mating regimes

Daisuke Kyogoku & Teiji Sota
Sexual selection sometimes favors male traits that benefit their bearers, but harm their mates. The harmful effects of male traits may also extend to females of other species via heterospecific mating interactions. This could affect the coexistence of closely related species during secondary contact. We examined the evolution of the interspecific interfering capability of a beetle (Callosobruchus chinensis) with a congener (C. maculatus) using C. chinensis males reared under conditions of monogamy and polygamy for...

Data from: Tree leaf and root traits mediate soil faunal contribution to litter decomposition across an elevational gradient

Saori Fujii, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen, Matty P. Berg & Akira S. Mori
1.Plant litter decomposition is key to carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Soil fauna are important litter decomposers, but how their contribution to decomposition changes with alterations in plant composition and climate is not well established. 2.Here we quantified how soil mesofauna affect decomposition rate interactively with climate and leaf and root traits. We conducted an in situ decomposition experiment using eight dominant tree species per forest site across four elevations (50, 400, 600...

Data from: Methods for invasive species control are transferable across invaded areas

Takashi Haramura, Michael R. Crossland, Hirohiko Takeuchi & Richard Shine
Cane Toads (Rhinella marina) are invasive pests in many parts of the world, including the Japanese island of Ishigaki. Extensive research in Australia has identified promising new methods for control, but also has shown that toads exhibit geographic variation in many traits (suggesting that methods developed in one location may not work in another). Can the approaches developed in Australia play a useful role for controlling this invasive species in Japan? Our experimental trials on...

Data from: Reconsidering the phosphorus limitation of soil microbial activity in tropical forests

Taiki Mori, Xiankai Lu, Ryota Aoyagi & Jiangming Mo
1. It has long been believed that soil microbial activity in tropical forest ecosystems is limited by phosphorus (P) rather than nitrogen (N) availability. In this study, we reviewed the methods used to determine the limiting nutrients and evaluated the validity of the widespread P-limitation hypothesis in tropical forest soils. 2. The most commonly used analysis method entails testing whether fertilization increased microbial biomass or soil respiration. Fertilization using microbial biomass as an indicator was...

Data from: Biodiversity-ecosystem function relationships change through primary succession

Akira Mori, Takashi Osono, J. Hans C. Cornelissen, Joseph Craine & Masaki Uchida
Ecologists traditionally use environmental parameters to predict successional shifts in compositional characteristics of local species assemblages (environmental control). Another important focus in ecology is to understand functional roles of species assemblages in determining local environmental properties (diversity control). Then, the question emerges: which is the cause, and which is the consequence? To clarify the causal relationships between species assemblages and environmental properties, we focused on seral changes in species/functional diversity of vascular plants in tundra...

Data from: Development of nuclear microsatellite markers for the Japanese conifers Tsuga diversifolia and T. sieboldii (Pinaceae)

James R.P. Worth, Jong-Cheol Yang, Seiichi Kanetani, Satoshi Kikuchi, Shota Sakaguchi & Tokuko Ihara-Udino
Nuclear microsatellite markers were developed for the two Tsuga species native to the Japanese Archipelago, Tsuga diversifolia and T. sieboldii, and a population with genetic affinities to T. diversifolia on Ulleung Island, Korea. Tsuga diversifolia and T. sieboldii are widespread dominant trees of temperate and subalpine forests in Japan but to date no genetic markers have been developed for these species. Fifteen polymorphic loci were developed and characterized, of which 14 are reliably amplified in...

Data from: Priority effects can persist across floral generations in nectar microbial metacommunities

Hirokazu Toju, Rachel L. Vannette, Marie-Pierre L. Gauthier, Manpreet K. Dhami & Tadashi Fukami
The order of species arrival can influence how species interact with one another and, consequently, which species may coexist in local communities. This phenomenon, called priority effects, has been observed in various types of communities, but it remains unclear whether priority effects persist over the long term spanning multiple generations of local communities in metacommunities. Focusing on bacteria and yeasts that colonize floral nectar of the sticky monkey flower, Mimulus aurantiacus, via hummingbirds and other...

Data from: Chimpanzee intellect: personality, performance and motivation with touchscreen tasks

Drew M. Altschul, Emma K. Wallace, Ruth Sonnweber, Masaki Tomonaga, Alex Weiss & Alexander Weiss
Human intellect is characterized by intercorrelated psychological domains, including intelligence, academic performance and personality. Higher openness is associated with higher intelligence and better academic performance, yet high performance among individuals is itself attributable to intelligence, not openness. High conscientiousness individuals, although not necessarily more intelligent, are better performers. Work with other species is not as extensive, yet animals display similar relationships between exploration- and persistence-related personality traits and performance on cognitive tasks. However, previous studies...

Data from: Organelles that illuminate the origins of Trichomonas hydrogenosomes and Giardia mitosomes

Michelle M. Leger, Martin Kolisko, Ryoma Kamikawa, Courtney W. Stairs, Keitaro Kume, Ivan Čepička, Jeffrey D. Silberman, Jan O. Andersson, Feifei Xu, Akinori Yabuki, Laura Eme, Qianqian Zhang, Kiyotaka Takishita, Yuji Inagaki, Alastair G. B. Simpson, Tetsuo Hashimoto & Andrew J. Roger
Many anaerobic microbial parasites possess highly modified mitochondria known as mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs). The best-studied of these are the hydrogenosomes of Trichomonas vaginalis and Spironucleus salmonicida, which produce ATP anaerobically through substrate-level phosphorylation with concomitant hydrogen production; and the mitosomes of Giardia intestinalis, which are functionally reduced and lack any role in ATP production. However, to understand the metabolic specializations that these MROs underwent in adaptation to parasitism, data from their free-living relatives are needed....

Data from: Wolbachia-induced meiotic drive and feminization is associated with an independent occurrence of selective mitochondrial sweep in a butterfly

Mai Miyata, Tatsuro Konagaya, Kenji Yukuhiro, Masashi Nomura & Daisuke Kageyama
Maternally inherited Wolbachia endosymbionts manipulate arthropod reproduction in various ways. In the butterfly Eurema mandarina, a cytoplasmic incompatibility-inducing Wolbachia strain wCI and the associated mtDNA haplotypes are known to originate from the sister species Eurema hecabe, which offered a good case study for microbe-mediated hybrid introgression. Besides wCI, some females with the Z0 karyotype harbour a distinct Wolbachia strain wFem, which causes all-female production by meiotic drive and feminization. We report that a considerable proportion...

Data from: Optimizing mating encounters by sexually dimorphic movements

Nobuaki Mizumoto, Masato S. Abe & Shigeto Dobata
All organisms with sexual reproduction undergo a process of mating, which essentially involves the encounter of two individuals belonging to different sexes. During mate search, both sexes should mutually optimize their encounters, thus raising a question of how they achieve this. Here, we show that a population with sexually dimorphic movement patterns achieves the highest individual mating success under a limited lifespan. Extensive simulations found and analytical approximations corroborated the existence of conditions under which...

Data from: Late Pleistocene origin of the entire circumarctic range of the arctic-alpine plant Kalmia procumbens

Hajime Ikeda, Pernille Bronken Eidesen, Valentin Yakubov, Vyacheslav Barkalov, Christian Brochmann & Hiroaki Setoguchi
The circumarctic ranges of arctic-alpine plants are thought to have been established in the late Pliocene/early Pleistocene, when the modern arctic tundra was formed in response to climate cooling. Previous findings of range-wide genetic structure in arctic-alpine plants have been thought to support this hypothesis, but few studies have explicitly addressed the temporal framework of the genetic structure. Here, we estimated the demographic history of the genetic structure in the circumarctic Kalmia procumbens using sequences...

Data from: Long-term species loss and homogenization of moth communities in Central Europe

Anu Valtonen, Aniko Hirka, Levente Szőcs, Matt Ayres, Heikki Roininen & György Csóka
As global biodiversity continues to decline steeply, it is becoming increasingly important to understand diversity patterns at local and regional scales. Changes in land use and climate, nitrogen deposition and invasive species are the most important threats to global biodiversity. Because land use changes tend to benefit a few species but impede many, the expected outcome is generally decreasing population sizes, decreasing species richness at local and regional scales, and increasing similarity of species compositions...

Data from: Behavioural flexibility in spider mites: oviposition site shifts based on past and present stimuli from conspecifics and predators

Aoi Murase, Kazuo Fujita & Shuichi Yano
Predator-experienced individuals often change their predation avoidance response when they re-encounter the same predators or their cues. Recent reports show that behavioural change sometimes occurs even before the re-encounter. To function as an adaptive strategy in the wild, such prospective experience-induced behaviour should change flexibly in response to changing situations. We assessed flexibility of experience-induced oviposition site shift in two closely related species of spider mites, Tetranychus kanzawai and T. urticae, from the viewpoint of...

Data from: Optimal foraging by herbivores maintains polymorphism in defence in a natural plant population

Yasuhiro Sato, Koichi Ito & Hiroshi Kudoh
1. Many species of plants and animals exhibit polymorphism for defensive traits. Adaptive foraging by natural enemies has long been hypothesized to maintain such polymorphism, but this has not been clearly demonstrated in a natural prey or host population. 2. The purpose of this study was to address whether the brassica leaf beetle Phaedon brassicae promotes the maintenance of defence polymorphism in the trichome-producing (hairy) and trichomeless (glabrous) morphs of Arabidopsis halleri subsp. gemmifera. Here,...

Data from: Chimpanzees recognize their own delayed self-image

Satoshi Hirata, Kohki Fuwa & Masako Myowa
Unlike mirror self-recognition, recognizing one's own image in delayed video footage may indicate the presence of a concept of self that extends across time and space. While humans typically show this ability around 4 years of age, it is unknown whether this capacity is found in non-human animals. In this study, chimpanzees performed a modified version of the mark test to investigate whether chimpanzees could remove stickers placed on the face and head while watching...

Data from: Primates adjust movement strategies due to changing food availability

Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Julie A. Teichroeb, Tyler R. Bonnell, Raul Uriel Hernández-Sarabia, Sofia M. Vickers, Juan Carlos Serio-Silva, Pascale Sicotte & Colin A. Chapman
Animals are hypothesized to search their environments in predictable ways depending on the distribution of resources. Evenly distributed foods are thought to be best exploited with random Brownian movements; while foods that are patchy or unevenly distributed require non-Brownian strategies, such as Lévy walks. Thus, when food distribution changes due to seasonal variation, animals should show concomitant changes in their search strategies. We examined this issue in six monkey species from Africa and Mexico: three...

Data from: Species-specific flowering cues among general flowering Shorea species at the Pasoh Research Forest, Malaysia

Yu-Yun Chen, Akiko Satake, I-Fang Sun, Yoshiko Kosugi, Makoto Tani, Shinya Numata, Stephen P. Hubbell, Christine Fletcher, Nur Supardi Md.Noor, S. Joseph Wright &
1.In a unique phenomenon restricted to the ever wet forests of Southeast Asia, hundreds of species from dozens of plant families reproduce synchronously at irregular, multi-year intervals. The proximate environmental cues that synchronize these general flowering events have not been evaluated systematically because there have been no long-term, high temporal-resolution, species-level records from the region. 2.We present 13 years of weekly flowering records for five Shorea species as well as daily temperature and rainfall records...

Data from: Genomic-wide displacement and shift of the hybrid zone in the Japanese fire-bellied newt

Atsushi Tominaga, Masafumi Matsui, Natsuhiko Yoshikawa, Koshiro Eto & Kanto Nishikawa
Hybridizations on a secondary contact zone between 2 diverged lineages can have various evolutionary consequences, including the genetic replacement of one lineage by another. We detected such a case between 2 lineages (the Central and Western lineages) of the Japanese fire-bellied newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster in the Chugoku district of western Japan. We genotyped 269 individuals from 30 localities using the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and 11 microsatellite loci. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis revealed that...

Data from: Contribution of lianas to community-level canopy transpiration in a warm-temperate forest

Ryuji Ichihashi, Chen-Way Chiu, Hikaru Komatsu, Tomonori Kume, Yoshinori Shinohara, Makiko Tateishi, Kenji Tsuruta, Kyoichi Otsuki & Chen-Wei Chiu
1. Lianas (woody climbers) have a greater amount of leaves relative to basal area or standing biomass than trees, and very wide vessels that permit efficient water transport. These features suggest that lianas possibly consume proportionally more water through transpiration than trees. Despite their potential importance, researchers have made only limited attempts to evaluate effects of lianas on forest water dynamics. 2. We conducted sap flow measurements for 1 year using a thermal-dissipation method for...

Data from: Feminizing Wolbachia endosymbiont disrupts maternal sex chromosome inheritance in a butterfly species

Daisuke Kageyama, Mizuki Ohno, Tatsushi Sasaki, Atsuo Yoshido, Tatsuro Konagaya, Akiya Jouraku, Seigo Kuwazaki, Hiroyuki Kanamori, Yuichi Katayose, Satoko Narita, Mai Miyata, Markus Riegler & Ken Sahara
Wolbachia is a maternally inherited ubiquitous endosymbiotic bacterium of arthropods that displays a diverse repertoire of host reproductive manipulations. For the first time, we demonstrate that Wolbachia manipulates sex chromosome inheritance in a sexually reproducing insect. Eurema mandarina butterfly females on Tanegashima Island, Japan, are infected with the wFem Wolbachia strain and produce all-female offspring, while antibiotic treatment results in male offspring. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that wFem-positive and wFem-negative females have Z0...

Data from: Effects of radiation from contaminated soil and moss in Fukushima on embryogenesis and egg hatching of the aphid Prociphilus oriens

Shin-Ichi Akimoto, Yang Li, Tetsuji Imanaka, Hitoshi Sato & Ken Ishida
Radiation-contaminated soils are widespread around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, and such soils raise concerns over its harmful effect on soil-dwelling organisms. We evaluated the effects of contaminated soil and moss sampled in Fukushima on the embryogenesis and hatching of aphid eggs, along with the measurement of the egg exposure dose. Cs-137 concentration in soil and moss from Fukushima ranged from 2200 to 3300 Bq/g and from 64 to 105 Bq/g, respectively. Eggs of...

Data from: A spatiotemporal analysis of acoustic interactions between great reed warblers (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) using microphone arrays and robot audition software HARK

Reiji Suzuki, Shiho Matsubayashi, Fumiyuki Saito, Tatsuyoshi Murate, Tomohisa Masuda, Kouichi Yamamoto, Ryosuke Kojima, Kazuhiro Nakadai & Hiroshi G. Okuno
Acoustic interactions are important for understanding intra- and interspecific communication in songbird communities from the viewpoint of soundscape ecology. It has been suggested that birds may divide up sound space to increase communication efficiency in such a manner that they tend to avoid overlap with other birds when they sing. We are interested in clarifying the dynamics underlying the process as an example of complex systems based on short-term behavioral plasticity. However, it is very...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    28

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    28

Affiliations

  • Kyoto University
    28
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    3
  • Yokohama National University
    3
  • University of Tokyo
    3
  • Kyushu University
    2
  • Ryukoku University
    2
  • Chiba University
    2
  • University of the Ryukyus
    2
  • National Museum
    1
  • VU University Amsterdam
    1