3 Works

Data from: Seed to seedling transitions in successional habitats across a tropical landscape

Marinés De La Peña-Domene, Henry F. Howe, Emiliano Cruz-León, Rita Jiménez-Rolland, Cesar Lozano-Huerta & Cristina Martínez-Garza
Recognition that tree recruitment depends on the balance between seed arrival and seedling survival has led to a surge of interest in seed-dispersal limitation and seedling-establishment limitation in primary forests. Virtually unaddressed are comparisons of this balance in mature and early successional habitats. We assessed seed rain and seedling recruitment dynamics of tree species in primary forest, secondary forest and pasture released from grazing in a tropical agricultural landscape. Seed to seedling ratios (seed effectiveness;...

Data from: A quantitative electrophysiological biomarker of duplication 15q11.2-q13.1 syndrome

Joel Frohlich, Damla Senturk, Vidya Saravanapandian, Peyman Golshani, Lawrence T. Reiter, Raman Sankar, Ronald Thibert, Charlotte Distefano, Scott Huberty, Edwin H. Cook & Shafali S. Jeste
Background: Duplications of 15q11.2-q13.1 (Dup15q syndrome) are highly penetrant for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A distinct electrophysiological (EEG) pattern characterized by excessive activity in the beta band has been noted in clinical reports. We asked whether EEG power in the beta band, as well as in other frequency bands, distinguished children with Dup15q syndrome from those with non-syndromic ASD and then examined the clinical correlates of this electrophysiological biomarker in Dup15q syndrome. Methods: In the...

Data from: From resource to female defence: the impact of roosting ecology on a bat's mating strategy

Linus Günther, Marlena D. Lopez, Mirjam Knörnschild, Kyle Reid, Martina Nagy & Frieder Mayer
With their extraordinary species richness and diversity in ecological traits and social systems, bats are a promising taxon for testing socio-ecological hypotheses in order to get new insights into the evolution of animal social systems. Regarding its roosting habits, proboscis bats form an extreme by occupying sites which are usually completely exposed to daylight (e.g. tree trunks, vines or rocks). This is accompanied by morphological and behavioural adaptations to remain cryptic in exposed day roosts....

Registration Year

  • 2016
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • University of Illinois at Chicago
    3
  • University of Tennessee Health Science Center
    1
  • Massachusetts General Hospital
    1
  • University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
    1
  • David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
    1
  • University of Melbourne
    1
  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    1
  • University of Chicago
    1
  • Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos
    1
  • University of California Los Angeles
    1