52 Works

Data from: Fitness of an allopolyploid rupicolous fern compared to its diploid progenitors: From sporogenesis to sporophyte formation

Emilia Pangua, Santiago Pajarón & Luis G. Quintanilla
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: When two populations of related cytotypes grow in sympatry, the rarer cytotype tends to be excluded due to a frequency-dependent mating disadvantage. Evolutionary models predict that polyploids, which are typically the rarer cytotype upon first formation, should have higher relative fitness and/or higher selfing rates to establish and then coexist with diploid parents. METHODS: We compared performance in early recruitment among three co-occurring rupicolous fern species: the allotetraploid Cheilanthes tinaei and...

Data from: Where to start? development of a spatial tool to prioritise retrofitting of power line poles that are dangerous to raptors

Ricardo Enrique Hernandez-Lambraño, José Ángel Sánchez-Agudo & Roberto Carbonell
1.Avian electrocution on power lines is a major conservation issue on a global scale. Electrocution risk models have recently been proposed as an effective alternative to prioritising high‐risk pole retrofitting activities at a large scale. However, existing models ignore the specific features of the power poles supporting the power distribution lines and make the tenuous assumption that pole density and power line length are key factors to assessing the electrocution risk at a large scale....

Data from: Feeding ecology and habitat preferences of top predators from two Miocene carnivore-rich assemblages

M. Soledad Domingo, Laura Domingo, Juan Abella, Alberto Valenciano, Catherine Badgley & Jorge Morales
Carnivoran-rich fossil sites are uncommon in the fossil record and, accordingly, provide valuable opportunities to study predators from vantages that are rarely applied to ancient faunas. Through stable isotopes of carbon and a Bayesian mixing model, we analyze time-successive (nearly contemporaneous), late Miocene carnivoran populations from two fossil sites (Batallones-1 and Batallones-3) from central Spain. Stable isotopes of carbon in tooth enamel provide a reliable and direct methodology to track ancient diets. These two carnivoran-dominated...

Data from: Factors associated with leucism in the common blackbird (Turdus merula)

Lucía Izquierdo, Robert L. Thomson, José I. Aguirre, Alazne Díez-Fernández, Bruno Faivre, Jordi Figuerola & Juan Diego Ibáñez-Álamo
Leucism is the total or partial lack of melanins in the skin and associate structures (i.e. hair or feathers). Little is known about the factors influencing this chromatic aberration although some local studies suggest that there is an effect of habitat, age and sex. To test these hypotheses and expand our knowledge on leucism, we carried out a large‐scale study using common blackbirds (Turdus merula) as our model species. Given the poor information available on...

The last representatives of the Superfamily Wellerelloidea (Brachiopoda, Rhynchonellida) in the westernmost Tethys (Iberian paleomargins) prior to their demise in the Early Toarcian Mass Extinction Event

José Francisco Baeza Carratalá & Fernando García Joral
The last clade-level extinction episode affecting the Phylum Brachiopoda has been long-established in the Early Toarcian Mass Extinction Event (ETMEE) around the Pliensbachian-Toarcian transition, when several rhynchonellide groups became extinct and others underwent a notable renewal in the western Tethys. Among them, Wellerelloidea is a long-range superfamily severely affected by this environmental crisis, embodying the subfamily Cirpinae as the last wellerelloids worldwide, prior to their global extinction in the Pb-To transition. The profuse record of...

Prioritizing road-kill mitigation areas: a spatially explicit national-scale model for an elusive carnivore

Luca Francesco Russo, Rafael Barrientos, Mauro Fabrizio, Mirko Di Febbraro & Anna Loy
Aim: Roads impact wildlife in different ways, among which road mortality has been the most studied. Budgets in conservation biology are usually small, and macroecological approaches have been employed in recent years as the first steps towards guiding management. Carnivores are particularly vulnerable to mortality on roads due to their elevated ecological needs (low population density, often low fecundity, and relatively large home ranges). Our aim was to develop a ranking methodology to prioritize specific...

Environmental conditions but not nest composition affect reproductive success in an urban bird

Pablo Capilla-Lasheras, Blanca Bondía & Jose Ignacio Aguirre
Birds can influence the environmental conditions that eggs and offspring experience by adjusting the composition of their nests. They often use feathers to build nests, presumably due to their insulating properties. The amount of feathers in nests is often associated with increased nestling survival and body condition. However, it is unclear whether these putative beneficial effects of adding feathers to nests are relevant in a wide range of environmental conditions or, instead, depend on the...

Off-target integron activity leads to rapid plasmid compensatory evolution in response to antibiotic selection pressure

Célia Souque, Jose Escudero & R Craig MacLean
Integrons are mobile genetic elements that have played an important role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. As shown previously (Souque et al, 2021), the integron can generate under stress combinatorial variation in resistance cassette expression by cassette re-shuffling, accelerating the evolution of resistance. However, the flexibility of the integron integrase site recognition motif hints at potential off-target effects of the integrase on the rest of the genome that may have important evolutionary consequences. Here...

Data from: Feeding specialisation and longer generation time are associated with relatively larger brains in bees

Ferran Sayol, Miguel Á. Collado, Joan Garcia-Porta, Marc A. Seid, Jason Gibbs, Ainhoa Agorreta, Diego San Mauro, Ivo Raemakers, Daniel Sol & Ignasi Bartomeus
Despite their miniature brains, insects exhibit substantial variation in brain size. Although the functional significance of this variation is increasingly recognized, research on whether differences in insect brain sizes are mainly the result of constraints or selective pressures has hardly been performed. Here, we address this gap by combining prospective and retrospective phylogenetic-based analyses of brain size for a major insect group, bees (superfamily Apoidea). Using a brain dataset of 93 species from North America...

Relationships between immune gene expression and circulating cytokine levels in wild house mice

Stuart Young, Jonathan Fenn, Elena Arriero, Ann Lowe, Benoit Poulin, Andrew MacColl & Jan Bradley
1. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) has been commonly used to measure gene expression in a number of research contexts, but the measured RNA concentrations do not always represent the concentrations of active proteins which they encode. This can be due to transcriptional regulation or post-translational modifications, or localisation of immune environments, as can occur during infection. However, in studies using free-living non-model species, such as in ecoimmunological research, qPCR may be the only available option to...

Data from: Morphological variation as a tool for monitoring bird populations: a review

José Luis Tellería, Iván De La Hera & Javier Perez-Tris
This paper shows how our knowledge of the evolution, ecology and conservation of birds can be improved through the analysis of external morphological traits. After giving a short history of morphological studies of birds, we discuss the pros and cons of such data in exploring within-species variation and describe the main patterns and hypotheses related to the factors affecting bird size and shape. We describe the usefulness of external measurements (including body mass and feather...

Data from: Great spotted cuckoo eggshell microstructure characteristics can make eggs stronger

Manuel Soler, Alejandro Rodriguez-Navarro, Tomás Pérez-Contreras, Juan García-Ruiz & Juan Soler
Obligate avian brood parasites lay stronger eggs than their hosts or non-parasitic relatives because they are rounder and have a thicker eggshell. Additionally, some other characteristics of the brood parasitic eggshells related to their microstructure such as size and orientation of calcite crystal units could also contribute to generating even stronger shells. An eggshell microstructure formed by small randomly oriented calcite crystal units can increase the robustness of the eggshells of birds. Here, the eggshell...

Data from: The ecology of seed dispersal by small rodents: a role for predator and conspecific scents

Pau Sunyer, Alberto Muñoz, Raúl Bonal & Josep Maria Espelta
1. Seed-caching rodents play a key role in the ecology of seed dispersal by not only consuming but also dispersing seeds. Rodent foraging behaviour is usually framed within optimal models which predict that their decisions should maximize food intake and minimize foraging costs. Yet, although predation risk and seed pilferage by conspecifics have been envisaged as two potential costs, their relevance for seed-caching behaviour and seed dispersal has barely been addressed. 2. To test the...

Data from: Fungal specificity and selectivity for algae play a major role in determining lichen partnerships across diverse ecogeographic regions in the lichen-forming family Parmeliaceae

Steven D. Leavitt, Ekaphan Kraichak, Matthew P. Nelsen, Susanne Altermann, Pradeep K. Divakar, David Alors, Theodore L. Esslinger, Ana Crespo, H. Thorsten Lumbsch & Thorsten Lumbsch
Microbial symbionts are instrumental to the ecological and long-term evolutionary success of their hosts, and the central role of symbiotic interactions is increasingly recognized across the vast majority of life. Lichens provide an iconic group for investigating patterns in species interactions; however, relationships among lichen symbionts are often masked by uncertain species boundaries or an inability to reliably identify symbionts. The species-rich lichen-forming fungal family Parmeliaceae provides a diverse group for assessing patterns of interactions...

Data from: A new earthworm species within a controversial genus: Eiseniona gerardoi sp. n. (Annelida, Lumbricidae) - description based on morphological and molecular data.

Marta Novo, Rosa Fernández, Mónica Gutiérrez, Dario J. Díaz Cosín, Daniel Fernández Marchán & Dario Diaz Cosin
The morphological and anatomical simplicity of soil dwelling animals, such as earthworms, has limited the establishment of a robust taxonomy making it sometimes subjective to authors’ criteria. Within this context, integrative approaches including molecular information are becoming more popular to solve the phylogenetic positioning of conflictive taxa. Here we present the description of a new lumbricid species from the region of Extremadura (Spain), Eiseniona gerardoi sp. n. The assignment to this genus is based on...

Data from: Distribution and functionality of copy number variation across European cattle populations

Maulik Upadhyay, Vinicius H. Da Silva, Hendrik-Jan Megens, Marleen H. P. W. Visker, Paolo Ajmone-Marsan, Valentin A. Bâlteanu, Susana Dunner, Jose Fernando Garcia, Catarina Ginja, Juha Kantanen, Martien A.M. Groenen, Richard P.M.A. Crooijmans, Vinicus H. Da Silva, Martien A. M. Groenen & Richard P. M. A. Crooijmans
Copy number variation (CNV), which is characterized by large-scale losses or gains of DNA fragments, contributes significantly to genetic and phenotypic variation. Assessing CNV across different European cattle populations might reveal genetic changes responsible for phenotypic differences, which have accumulated throughout the domestication history of cattle as consequences of evolutionary forces that act upon them. To explore pattern of CNVs across European cattle, we genotyped 149 individuals, that represent different European regions, using the Illumina...

Data from: Congruent phylogenetic and fossil signatures of mammalian diversification dynamics driven by tertiary abiotic change

Juan López Cantalapiedra, Manuel Hernández Fernández, Beatriz Azanza & Jorge Morales
Computational methods for estimating diversification rates from extant species phylogenetic trees have become abundant in evolutionary research. However, little evidence exists about how their outcome compares to a complementary and direct source of information: the fossil record. Furthermore, there is virtually no direct test for the congruence of evolutionary rates based on these two sources. This task is only achievable in clades with both a well-known fossil record and a complete phylogenetic tree. Here, we...

Data from: Genetic footprints of Iberian cattle in America 500 years after the arrival of Columbus

Amparo M. Martínez, Luis T. Gama, Javier Cañón, Catarina Ginja, Juan V. Delgado, Susana Dunner, Vincenzo Landi, Inmaculada Martín-Burriel, M. Cecilia T. Penedo, Clementina Rodellar, Jose Luis Vega-Pla, Atzel Acosta, Luz Ángela Álvarez, Esperanza Camacho, Óscar Cortés, José Ribamar Marques, Óscar Roberto Martínez, Rubén Darío Martínez, Lilia Melucci, Guillermo Martínez-Velázquez, Jose Ernesto Muñoz, Alicia Postiglioni, Jorge Quiroz, Philip Sponenberg, Odalys Uffo … & Ruben D. Martínez
BACKGROUND: American Creole cattle presumably descend from animals imported from the Iberian Peninsula during the period of colonization and settlement, through different migration routes, and may have also suffered the influence of cattle directly imported from Africa. The introduction of European cattle, which began in the 18th century, and later of Zebu from India, has threatened the survival of Creole populations, some of which have nearly disappeared or were admixed with exotic breeds. Assessment of...

The genetic ancestry of American Creole cattle inferred from uniparental and autosomal genetic markers

Oscar Cortes Gardyn, Catarina Ginja, Luis Telo De Gama, Amparo Martínez, Inmaculada Martín Burriel & Juan Vicente Delgado
Cattle imported from the Iberian Peninsula spread throughout America in the early years of discovery and colonization to originate Creole breeds, which adapted to a wide diversity of environments and later received infuences from other origins, including zebu cattle in more recent years. We analyzed uniparental genetic markers and autosomal microsatellites in DNA samples from 114 cattle breeds distributed worldwide, including 40 Creole breeds representing the whole American continent, and samples from the Iberian Peninsula,...

Integron array MICs and cassettes transcription data

Celia Souque, Jose Antonio Escudero & Craig MacLean
Mobile integrons are widespread genetic platforms that allow bacteria to modulate the expression of antibiotic resistance cassettes by shuffling their position from a common promoter. Antibiotic stress induces the expression of an integrase that excises and integrates cassettes, and this unique recombination and expression system is thought to allow bacteria to ‘evolve on demand’ in response to antibiotic pressure. To test this hypothesis, we inserted a custom three cassette integron into P. aeruginosa, and used...

Endocannabinoid signalling in stem cells and cerebral organoids drives differentiation to deep layer projection neurons via CB1 receptors

Juan Paraiso-Luna, Jose Aguareles, Ricardo Martin, Ane C. Ayo-Martin, Daniel Garcia-Rincon, Samuel Simon-Sanchez, Adan De Salas-Quiroga, Javier Diaz-Alonso, Elena Garcia-Taboada, Isabel Liste, Jose Sanchez-Prieto, Silvia Cappello, Manuel Guzman, Ismael Galve-Roperh & Carlos Costas-Insua
The endocannabinoid (eCB) system, via cannabinoid CB1 receptor, regulates neurodevelopment by controlling neural progenitor proliferation and neurogenesis. CB1 receptor signalling in vivo drives corticofugal deep layer projection neuron development through the regulation of BCL11B and Satb2 transcription factors. Here, we investigated the role of eCB signalling in mouse pluripotent embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal differentiation. Characterization of the eCB system revealed increased expression of eCB-metabolizing enzymes, eCB ligands and CB1 receptors along neuronal differentiation. CB1 receptor...

Data from: Mechanical and structural adaptations to migration in the flight feathers of a Palaearctic passerine

Iván De La Hera, Irene Hernández-Téllez, José Pérez-Rigueiro, Javier Pérez-Tris, Francisco Rojo & José Luis Tellería
Current avian migration patterns in temperate regions have been developed during the glacial retreat and subsequent colonization of the ice-free areas during the Holocene. This process resulted in a geographic gradient of greater seasonality as latitude increased that favoured migration-related morphological and physiological (co)adaptations. Most evidence of avian morphological adaptations to migration comes from the analysis of variation in the length and shape of the wings, but the existence of intra-feather structural adjustments has been...

Data from: Genome-wide signals of drift and local adaptation during rapid lineage divergence in a songbird

Guillermo Friis, Guillermo Fandos, Amanda J. Zellmer, John E. McCormack, Brant C. Faircloth & Borja Milá
The formation of independent evolutionary lineages involves neutral and selective factors, and understanding their relative roles in population divergence is a fundamental goal of speciation research. Correlations between allele frequencies and environmental variability can reveal the role of selection, yet the relative contribution of drift can be difficult to establish. Recently diversified taxa like the Oregon junco (Aves, Passerellidae, Junco hyemalis oreganus) of western North America provide ideal scenarios to apply genetic-environment association analyses (GEA)...

Data from: Carnivoran resource and habitat use in the context of a Late Miocene faunal turnover episode

Laura Domingo, M. Soledad Domingo, Paul L. Koch, Jorge Morales & M. Teresa Alberdi
We investigate resource and habitat use by apex predators through stable isotope analysis at two Spanish Late Miocene localities: Los Valles de Fuentidueña (~9.6 Ma, LVF) and Cerro de los Batallones (~9.1 Ma, BAT). The temporal window represented by LVF and BAT was crucial in the shaping of the current Iberian mammalian structure because it corresponds to the initial stages of a faunal turnover episode and regional environmental change at ~9.5–8.5 Ma (Vallesian–Turolian transition), associated...

Ecological and geographical marginality in rear edge populations of Palaearctic forest birds (data)

José Luis Tellería, Ricardo Hernández-Lambraño & Roberto Carbonell
The centre–periphery hypothesis predicts that habitat suitability will decrease at the edge of a species' range, a pattern often questioned by empirical data. Here we explore if habitat suitability decreases southwards and shapes the abundance distribution of rear edge populations of forest birds within the restricted geographical setting of the south-western Palaearctic. We also test if birds endemic to the area fit more poorly to the latitudinal decrease of habitat suitability due to the putative...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    5
  • 2021
    11
  • 2020
    10
  • 2019
    3
  • 2018
    4
  • 2017
    6
  • 2015
    7
  • 2014
    2
  • 2013
    3
  • 2012
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    52

Affiliations

  • Complutense University of Madrid
    52
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    5
  • Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales
    5
  • Centre for Research on Ecology and Forestry Applications
    5
  • King Juan Carlos University
    4
  • University of Zaragoza
    3
  • Spanish National Research Council
    3
  • University of the Basque Country
    2
  • Sao Paulo State University
    2
  • University of Eastern Finland
    2