5 Works

Data from: Regime shifts in marine communities: a complex systems perspective on food web dynamics

Johanna Yletyinen, Örjan Bodin, Marie Nordström, Benjamin Weigel, Erik Bonsdorff & Thorsten Blenckner
Species composition and habitats are changing at unprecedented rates in the world’s oceans, potentially causing entire food webs to shift to structurally and functionally different regimes. Despite the severity of these regime shifts, elucidating the precise nature of their underlying processes has remained difficult. We address this challenge with a new analytic approach to detect and assess the relative strength of different driving processes in food webs. Our study draws on complexity theory, and integrates...

Data from: Cooperation-mediated plasticity in dispersal and colonization

Staffan Jacob, Priscilla Wehi, Jean Clobert, Delphine Legrand, Nicolas Schtickzelle, Michele Huet & Alexis Chaine
Kin selection theory predicts that costly cooperative behaviors evolve most readily when directed toward kin. Dispersal plays a controversial role in the evolution of cooperation: dispersal decreases local population relatedness and thus opposes the evolution of cooperation, but limited dispersal increases kin competition and can negate the benefits of cooperation. Theoretical work has suggested that plasticity of dispersal, where individuals can adjust their dispersal decisions according to the social context, might help resolve this paradox...

Data from: Defining functional biomes and monitoring their change globally

Steven I. Higgins, Robert Buitenwerf, Glenn Moncrieff & Glenn R. Moncrieff
Biomes are important constructs for organizing understanding of how the worlds’ major terrestrial ecosystems differ from one another and for monitoring change in these ecosystems. Yet existing biome schemes have been criticized for being overly subjective and for explicitly or implicitly invoking climate. We propose a new biome map and classification scheme that uses information on (i) an index of vegetation productivity, (ii) whether the minimum of vegetation activity is in the driest or coldest...

Data from: Differences in endophyte communities of introduced trees depend on the phylogenetic relatedness of the receiving forest

Michael J. Gundale, Juan P. Almeida, Håkan Wallander, David A. Wardle, Paul Kardol, Marie-Charlotte Nilsson Hegethorn, Alex Fajardo, Anibal Pauchard, Duane A. Peltzer, Seppo Ruotsalainen, Bill Mason, Nicholas Rosenstock & Marie-Charlotte Nilsson
Plant species sometimes perform extraordinarily well when introduced to new environments, through achieving higher growth rates, individual biomasses or higher densities in their receiving communities compared to their native range communities. One hypothesis proposed to explain enhanced performance in species’ new environments is that their soil microbial communities may be different and provide greater benefit than microbial communities encountered in species’ native environments. However, detailed descriptions of soil biota associated with species in both their...

Data from: De novo transcriptome analysis of the common New Zealand stick insect Clitarchus hookeri (Phasmatodea) reveals genes involved in olfaction, digestion and sexual reproduction

Chen Wu, Ross N Crowhurst, Alice B. Dennis, Victoria G. Twort, Shanlin Liu, Richard D. Newcomb, Howard A. Ross & Thomas R. Buckley
Phasmatodea, more commonly known as stick insects, have been poorly studied at the molecular level for several key traits, such as components of the sensory system and regulators of reproduction and development, impeding a deeper understanding of their functional biology. Here, we employ de novo transcriptome analysis to identify genes with primary functions related to female odour reception, digestion, and male sexual traits in the New Zealand common stick insect Clitarchus hookeri (White). The female...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    5

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    5

Affiliations

  • Landcare Research
    5
  • Lund University
    1
  • Stockholm Resilience Centre
    1
  • University of Otago
    1
  • Université Catholique de Louvain
    1
  • Åbo Akademi University
    1
  • University Austral de Chile
    1
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    1
  • Natural Resources Institute Finland
    1
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    1