11 Works

Data from: Exploring rainforest diversification using demographic model testing in the African foam-nest treefrog (Chiromantis rufescens)

Adam Leache, Daniel Portik, Danielle Rivera, Mark-Oliver Rodel, Johannes Penner, Václav Gvoždík, Eli Greenbaum, Gregory Jongsma, Caleb Ofori-Boateng, Marius Burger, Edem Eniang, Rayna Bell & Matthew Fujita
Aim: Species with wide distributions spanning the African Guinean and Congolian rainforests are often composed of genetically distinct populations or cryptic species with geographic distributions that mirror the locations of the remaining forest habitats. We used phylogeographic inference and demographic model testing to evaluate diversification models in a widespread rainforest species, the African Foam-nest Treefrog (Chiromantis rufescens). Location: Guinean and Congolian rainforests, West and Central Africa. Taxon: Chiromantis rufescens. Methods: We collected mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)...

Data from: Preserved collagen reveals species identity in archaeological marine turtle bones from Caribbean and Florida sites

Michael Buckley, Virginia L. Harvey, Michelle J. LeFebvre, Susan D. DeFrance, Casper Toftgaard & Andrew C. Kitchener
Advancements in molecular science are continually improving our understanding of marine turtle biology and evolution. However, there are still considerable gaps in our understanding, such as past marine turtle distributions, which can benefit from advanced zooarchaeological analyses. Here we apply collagen fingerprinting to 130 archaeological marine turtle bone samples up to 2500 years old from the Caribbean and Florida’s Gulf Coast for faunal identification, finding the vast majority of samples (88%) to contain preserved collagen...

Data from: Out of the Orient: Post-Tethyan transoceanic and trans-Arabian routes fostered the spread of Baorini skippers in the Afrotropics

Emmanuel F.A. Toussaint, Roger Vila, Masaya Yago, Hideyuki Chiba, Andrew D. Warren, Kwaku Aduse-Poku, Caroline Storer, Kelly M. Dexter, Kiyoshi Maruyama, David J. Lohman & Akito Y. Kawahara
The origin of taxa presenting a disjunct distribution between Africa and Asia has puzzled biogeographers for more than a century. This biogeographic pattern has been hypothesized to be the result of transoceanic long‐distance dispersal, Oligocene dispersal through forested corridors, Miocene dispersal through the Arabian Peninsula or passive dispersal on the rifting Indian plate. However, it has often been difficult to pinpoint the mechanisms at play. We investigate biotic exchange between the Afrotropics and the Oriental...

Data from: Origin of angiosperms and the puzzle of the Jurassic gap

Hong-Tao Li, Ting-Shuang Yi, Lian-Ming Gao, Peng-Fei Ma, Ting Zhang, Jun-Bo Yang, Matthew A. Gitzendanner, Peter W. Fritsch, Jie Cai, Yang Luo, Hong Wang, Michelle Van Der Bank, Shu-Dong Zhang, Qing-Feng Wang, Jian Wang, Zhi-Rong Zhang, Chao-Nan Fu, Jing Yang, Peter M. Hollingsworth, Mark W. Chase, Douglas E. Soltis, Pamela S. Soltis & De-Zhu Li
Angiosperms are by far the most species-rich clade of land plants, but their origin and early evolutionary history remain poorly understood. We reconstructed angiosperm phylogeny based on 80 genes from 2,881 plastid genomes representing 85% of extant families and all orders. With a well-resolved plastid tree and 62 fossil calibrations, we dated the origin of the crown angiosperms to the Upper Triassic, with major angiosperm radiations occurring in the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous. This estimated...

Data from: Palaeoproteomics resolves sloth phylogeny

Samantha Presslee, Graham J. Slater, Francois Pujos, Analia M. Forasiepi, Roman Fischer, Kelly Molloy, Meaghan Mackie, Jesper V. Olsen, Alejandro Kramarz, Matias Taglioretti, Fernando Scaglia, Maximiliano Lezcano, José Luis Lanata, John Southon, Robert Feranec, Jonathan Bloch, Adam Hajduk, Fabiana M. Martin, Rodolfo Salas Gismondi, Marcelo Reguero, Christian De Muizon, Alex Greenwood, Brian T. Chait, Kirsty Penkman, Matthew Collins … & Ross D. E. MacPhee
The living tree sloths Choloepus and Bradypus are the only remaining members of Folivora, a major xenarthran radiation that occupied a wide range of habitats in many parts of the western hemisphere during the Cenozoic, including both continents and the West Indies. Ancient DNA evidence has played only a minor role in folivoran systematics, as most sloths lived in places not conducive to genomic preservation. Here we utilize collagen sequence information, both separately and in...

Phylotranscriptomic analyses reveal asymmetrical gene duplication dynamics and signatures of ancient polyploidy in mints

Grant T Godden, Taliesin J Kinser, Pamela Soltis & Douglas E Soltis
Ancient duplication events and retained gene duplicates have contributed to the evolution of many novel plant traits and, consequently, to the diversity and complexity within and across plant lineages. While mounting evidence highlights the importance whole-genome duplication (WGD; polyploidy) and its key role as an evolutionary driver, gene duplication dynamics and mechanisms, both of which are fundamental to our understanding of evolutionary process and patterns of plant diversity, remain poorly characterized in many clades. We...

Data from: Effects of taxon sampling and tree reconstruction methods on phylodiversity metrics

Johanna Jantzen, W. Mark Whitten, Kurt Neubig, Lucas Majure, Douglas Soltis & Pam Soltis
1. The amount and patterns of phylodiversity in a community are often used to draw inferences about the local and historical factors affecting community assembly and can be used to prioritize communities and locations for conservation. Because measures of phylodiversity are based on the topology and branch lengths of phylogenetic trees, which are affected by the number and diversity of taxa in the tree, these analyses may be sensitive to changes in taxon sampling and...

Data from: A phylogenomic framework, evolutionary timeline and genomic resources for comparative studies of decapod crustaceans

Joanna M. Wolfe, Jesse W. Breinholt, Keith A. Crandall, Alan R. Lemmon, Emily Moriarty Lemmon, Laura E. Timm, Mark E. Siddall & Heather D. Bracken-Grissom
Comprising over 15 000 living species, decapods (crabs, shrimp and lobsters) are the most instantly recognizable crustaceans, representing a considerable global food source. Although decapod systematics have received much study, limitations of morphological and Sanger sequence data have yet to produce a consensus for higher-level relationships. Here, we introduce a new anchored hybrid enrichment kit for decapod phylogenetics designed from genomic and transcriptomic sequences that we used to capture new high-throughput sequence data from 94...

Data from: Rates of niche and phenotype evolution lag behind diversification in a temperate radiation

Ryan A. Folk, Rebecca L. Stubbs, Mark E. Mort, Nico Cellinese, Julie M. Allen, Pamela S. Soltis, Douglas E. Soltis & Robert P. Guralnick
Environmental change can create opportunities for increased rates of lineage diversification, but continued species accumulation has been hypothesized to lead to slowdowns via competitive exclusion and niche partitioning. Such density-dependent models imply tight linkages between diversification and trait evolution, but there are plausible alternative models. Little is known about the association between diversification and key ecological and phenotypic traits at broad phylogenetic and spatial scales. Do trait evolutionary rates coincide with rates of diversification, are...

The biotic interactions hypothesis partially explains bird species turnover along a lowland Neotropical precipitation gradient

Juan Pablo Gomez, Jose Ponciano, Gusatvo Londoño & Scott Robinson
Aim We evaluated the influence of climate in determining bird communities along precipitation gradients. We argue that mechanisms responsible for community turnover along precipitation gradients are similar to mechanisms operating along temperature and latitudinal gradients. We test the hypothesis that environmental conditions affect community composition in dry forests, whereas biotic interactions affect community composition in wet forests. Location Low-elevation forests along a precipitation gradient in Colombia where precipitation ranges from 700 – 4000 mm annually...

Data from: Phylogenomics reveals the evolutionary timing and pattern of butterflies and moths

Akito Y. Kawahara, David Plotkin, Marianne Espeland, Karen Meusemann, Emmanuel F. A. Toussaint, Alexander Donath, France Gimnich, Paul B. Frandsen, Andreas Zwick, Mario Dos Reis, Jesse R. Barber, Ralph S. Peters, Shanlin Liu, Xin Zhou, Christoph Mayer, Lars Podsiadlowski, Caroline Storer, Jayne E. Yack, Bernhard Misof & Jesse W. Breinholt
Butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) are one of the major super-radiations of insects, comprising nearly 160,000 described extant species. As herbivores, pollinators, and prey, Lepidoptera play a fundamental role in almost every terrestrial ecosystem. Lepidoptera are also indicators of environmental change and serve as model organisms for research on mimicry and genetics. They have been central to the development of co-evolutionary hypotheses, such as butterflies with flowering plants, and moths' evolutionary arms race with echolocating bats....

Registration Year

  • 2019
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    11

Affiliations

  • Florida Museum of Natural History
    11
  • University of Florida
    5
  • University of Copenhagen
    2
  • Natural History Museum of Geneva
    2
  • American Museum of Natural History
    2
  • Bernardino Rivadavia Natural Sciences Museum
    1
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • City University of New York
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig
    1