10 Works

Functional biogeography of Neotropical moist forests: trait-climate relationships and assembly patterns of tree communities

Bruno Pinho, Marcelo Tabarelli, Cajo Ter Braak, S. J. Wright, Victor Arroyo-Rodriguez, Maíra Benchimol, Bettina Engelbrecht, Simon Pierce, Peter Hietz, Bráulio Santos, Carlos Peres, Sandra Müller, Ian Wright, Frans Bongers, Madelon Lohbeck, Ülo Niinemets, Martijn Slot, Steven Jansen, Davi Jamelli, Renato Augusto Ferreira De Lima, Nathan Swenson, Richard Condit, Jos Barlow, Ferry Slik, Manuel Hernández-Ruedas … & Felipe Melo
Aim: Here we examine the functional profile of regional tree species pools across the latitudinal distribution of Neotropical moist forests, and test trait-climate relationships among local communities. We expected opportunistic strategies (acquisitive traits, small seeds) to be overrepresented in species pools further from the equator due to long-term instability, but also in terms of abundance in local communities in currently wetter, warmer and more seasonal climates. Location: Neotropics. Time period: Recent. Major taxa studied: Trees....

Data from: Phylogeography and demographic history of two widespread Indo-Pacific mudskippers (Gobiidae: Periophthalmus)

Gianluca Polgar, Lorenzo Zane, Massimiliano Babbucci, Federica Barbisan, Tomaso Patarnello, Lukas Rüber & Chiara Papetti
This study provides a first description of the phylogeographic patterns and evolutionary history of two species of the mudskipper genus Periophthalmus. These amphibious gobies are distributed throughout the whole Indo-Pacific region and Atlantic coast of Africa, in peritidal habitats of soft-bottom coastal ecosystems. Three sequence datasets of two widely distributed species, Periophthalmus argentilineatus and P. kalolo, were obtained by amplifying and sequencing two mtDNA markers (D-loop and 16S rDNA) and the nDNA rag1 region. The...

Data from: Ecological outsourcing: a pitcher plant benefits from transferring pre-digestion of prey to a bat mutualist

Caroline R. Schöner, Michael G. Schöner, T. Ulmar Grafe, Charles M. Clarke, Linda Dombrowski, Moi Chan Tan & Gerald Kerth
Mutualisms are interspecific interactions where each of the species involved gains net benefits from the other(s). The exchange of resources and/or services between mutualistic partners often involves tasks that species originally accomplished themselves but which have been taken over by or transferred to the more efficient partner during the evolution of the mutualism. Such ‘ecological outsourcing’ can be seen, for example, in several carnivorous plants that have transferred prey capture and digestion to animal partners....

Data from: Sex is determined by XY chromosomes across the radiation of dioecious Nepenthes pitcher plants

Mathias Scharmann, T Ulmar Grafe, Faizah Metali & Alex Widmer
Species with separate sexes (dioecy) are a minority among flowering plants, but dioecy has evolved multiple times independently in their history. The sex determination system and sex-linked genomic regions are currently identified in a limited number of dioecious plants only. Here, we study the sex-determination system in a genus of dioecious plants that lack heteromorphic sex chromosomes and are not amenable to controlled breeding: Nepenthes pitcher plants. We genotyped wild populations of flowering males and...

Data from: The distribution of plants and seed dispersers in response to habitat fragmentation in an artificial island archipelago

Jiajia Liu, Ferry Slik, David Coomes, Richard T. Corlett, Yanping Wang, Maxwell Wilson, Guang Hu, Ping Ding & Mingjian Yu
Aim: Small, old-growth forest fragments generally have more small-seeded plants than large patches, due to the disappearance of large seed dispersing vertebrates. This pattern may differ for secondary forest fragments where differential migration ability rather than persistence of seed dispersers may be driving plant community assembly. In this paper, we investigated the effect of habitat fragmentation on seed dispersers and plant community structure in regenerating forests. Location: The Thousand Island Lake, China. Taxon: Plants, birds...

Data from: Patterns of nitrogen-fixing tree abundance in forests across Asia and America

Duncan N. L. Menge, Ryan A. Chisholm, Stuart J. Davies, Kamariah Abu Salim, David Allen, Mauricio Alvarez, Norm Bourg, Warren Y. Brockelman, Sarayudh Bunyavejchewin, Nathalie Butt, Min Cao, Wirong Chanthorn, Wei-Chun Chao, Keith Clay, Richard Condit, Susan Cordell, João Batista Da Silva, H. S. Dattaraja, Ana Cristina Segalin De Andrade, Alexandre A. Oliveira, Jan Den Ouden, Michael Drescher, Christine Fletcher, Christian P. Giardina, C. V. Savitri Gunatilleke … & Tak Fung
Symbiotic nitrogen (N)‐fixing trees can provide large quantities of new N to ecosystems, but only if they are sufficiently abundant. The overall abundance and latitudinal abundance distributions of N‐fixing trees are well characterised in the Americas, but less well outside the Americas. Here, we characterised the abundance of N‐fixing trees in a network of forest plots spanning five continents, ~5,000 tree species and ~4 million trees. The majority of the plots (86%) were in America...

Data from: Beyond the limits: identifying the high-frequency detectors in the anuran ear

Ariadna Cobo-Cuan, T. Ulmar Grafe & Peter M. Narins
Despite the predominance of low-frequency hearing in anuran amphibians, a few frog species have evolved high-frequency communication within certain environmental contexts. Huia cavitympanum is the most remarkable anuran with regard to upper frequency limits; it is the first frog species known to emit exclusively ultrasonic signals. Characteristics of the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions from the amphibian papilla and the basilar papilla were analysed to gain insight into the structures responsible for high-frequency/ultrasound sensitivity. Our results...

Museomics for reconstructing historical floristic exchanges: Divergence of Stone Oaks across Wallacea

Joeri Strijk, Hoang Thi Bin Thi Bin, Ferry Slik, Rahayu Sukri, Yoshihisa Suyama, Shuichiro Tagane, Jan Wieringa, Tetsukazu Yahara & Damien Hinsinger
Natural history collections and tropical tree diversity are treasure troves of biological and evolutionary information, but its accessibility is impeded by several properties. DNA in historical specimens generally occurs in a highly fragmented state, complicating the recovery of high-grade genetic material for scientific studies. Our understanding of hyperdiverse, wide-spread tree assemblages suffers from patchy information on distributions, phenology and paucity of diagnostic characters. This prohibits rapid identification and the strengthening of taxonomic frameworks and in...

Data from: Ecomorphological adaptation in three mudskippers (Teleostei: Gobioidei: Gobiidae) from the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman

Gianluca Polgar, Mehdi Ghanbarifardi, Salvatore Milli, Ainhoa Agorreta, Mansour Aliabadian, Hamid Reza Esmaeili & Tsung Fei Khang
We hypothesise that the body shapes of three mudskipper species (Boleophthalmus dussumieri, Periophthalmus waltoni, and Scartelaos tenuis) are ecomorphological adaptations to different epi- and infaunal habitats. We investigated: (i) the association between burrow density and selected ecological variables; (ii) the phylogenetic relationships among these species, based on two mtDNA and one nDNA markers; (iii) their geometric morphometrics and ancestral shape reconstructions, based on two-dimensional landmark configurations; and (iv) their body surface-to-volume ratios (SAV), based on...

Data from: How temporal patterns in rainfall determine the geomorphology and carbon fluxes of tropical peatlands

Alexander R. Cobb, Alison M. Hoyt, Laure Gandois, Jangarun Eri, René Dommain, Kamariah Abu Salim, Fuu Ming Kai, Nur Salihah Haji Su'ut & Charles F. Harvey
Tropical peatlands now emit hundreds of megatons of carbon dioxide per year because of human disruption of the feedbacks that link peat accumulation and groundwater hydrology. However, no quantitative theory has existed for how patterns of carbon storage and release accompanying growth and subsidence of tropical peatlands are affected by climate and disturbance. Using comprehensive data from a pristine peatland in Brunei Darussalam, we show how rainfall and groundwater flow determine a shape parameter (the...

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