3 Works

Data from: Genotyping by sequencing resolves shallow population structure to inform conservation of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

Wesley A. Larson, Lisa W. Seeb, Meredith V. Everett, Ryan K. Waples, William D. Templin & James E. Seeb
Recent advances in population genomics have made it possible to detect previously unidentified structure, obtain more accurate estimates of demographic parameters, and explore adaptive divergence, potentially revolutionizing the way genetic data are used to manage wild populations. Here, we identified 10 944 single-nucleotide polymorphisms using restriction-site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing to explore population structure, demography, and adaptive divergence in five populations of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from western Alaska. Patterns of population structure were similar to...

Data from: Fine-scale sampling reveals distinct isolation by distance patterns in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) populations occupying a glacially dynamic environment

Eleni L. Petrou, James E. Seeb, Lorenz Hauser, Mark J. Witteveen, William D. Templin & Lisa W. Seeb
Populations with spatially restricted gene flow are characterized by genetic differentiation that may be positively correlated with the geographic distance separating populations, a pattern known as isolation by distance (IBD). Here we examined the fine-scale genetic structure of 66 chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) populations spawning in Alaska waterways and explored patterns of IBD using 90 nuclear and 3 mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphisms. Estimating population structure of chum salmon in Alaska is of increasing concern because...

Data from: Secondary contact and changes in coastal hydrology influence the nonequilibrium population structure of a salmonid (Oncorhynchus keta)

Eleni L. Petrou, Lorenz Hauser, Robin S. Waples, Jim E. Seeb, William D. Templin, Daniel Gomez-Uchida & Lisa W. Seeb
Numerous empirical studies have reported lack of migration–drift equilibrium in wild populations. Determining the causes of nonequilibrium population structure is challenging because different evolutionary processes acting at a variety of spatiotemporal scales can produce similar patterns. Studies of contemporary populations in northern latitudes suggest that nonequilibrium population structure is probably caused by recent colonization of the region after the last Pleistocene ice age ended ~13 000 years ago. The chum salmon's (Oncorhynchus keta) range was...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • University of Washington
    3
  • Alaska Department of Fish and Game
    3
  • Northwest Fisheries Science Center
    1