108 Works

Partially Penetrating Lake-Aquifer Interaction in a Laboratory-scale Tidal Setting

Amir Jazayeri, Adrian Werner & Nick Cartwright
Freshwater lakes close to the coast are important ecotones with strong functional dependency on ocean forces. Tides are likely to create dynamic lake-groundwater interactions, which have not been previously assessed for partially penetrating lakes. This study investigates tidal lake-groundwater interaction in a laboratory-scale aquifer cross-section with and without the existence of a partially penetrating lake. The experimental observations were reproduced by numerical models to allow for an in-depth evaluation of the experiments beyond those provided...

Storm Surge Risk Scenarios for the East Coast of Queensland

Rodger Tomlinson &
Library of tropical cyclone / storm surge inundation scenario maps generated by numerical modelling for use in disaster management planning for the east coast of Queensland.

High Resolution Ocean Modelling for South-east Queensland

Daijiro Kobashi
This data set contains research conducted by Dr. Daijirro Kobashi for the period of Jan 2011 to Jan 2014. The dataset contains a series of files containing modelling data pertaining to ocean readings from the South-East Queensland region. The format of the model outputs are netcdf. The files are archived for further analysis. The project implements high-resolution ocean models to investigate coastal processes for the South-East Queensland.

Data from: Severe childhood speech disorder: Gene discovery highlights transcriptional dysregulation

Michael Hildebrand, Victoria Jackson, Thomas Scerri, Olivia Van Reyk, Matthew Coleman, Ruth Braden, Samantha Turner, Kristin Rigbye, Amber Boys, Sarah Barton, Richard Webster, Michael Fahey, Kerryn Saunders, Bronwyn Parry-Fielder, Georgia Paxton, Michael Hayman, David Coman, Himanshu Goel, Anne Baxter, Alan Ma, Noni Davis, Sheena Reilly, Martin Delatycki, Frederique Liégeois, Alan Connelly … & Angela Morgan
Objective: Determining the genetic basis of speech disorders provides insight into the neurobiology of human communication. Despite intensive investigation over the past two decades, the etiology of most children with speech disorder remains unexplained. Here we searched for a genetic etiology in children with severe speech disorder, specifically childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Methods: Precise phenotyping together with research genome or exome analysis were performed on children referred with a primary diagnosis of CAS, as...

Data from: Muscle contributions to the acceleration of the whole body centre of mass during recovery from forward loss of balance by stepping in young and older adults

David F. Graham, Christopher P. Carty, David G. Lloyd & Rod S. Barrett
The purpose of this study was to determine the muscular contributions to the acceleration of the whole body centre of mass (COM) of older compared to younger adults that were able to recover from forward loss of balance with a single step. Forward loss of balance was achieved by releasing participants (14 older adults and 6 younger adults) from a static whole-body forward lean angle of approximately 18 degrees. 10 older adults and 6 younger...

Data from: Genome-wide SNPs identify limits to connectivity in the extreme freshwater disperser, spangled perch Leiopotherapon unicolor (Terapontidae)

Daniel J. Schmidt, Joel A. Huey & Jane M. Hughes
The utility of restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) to resolve fine-scale population structure was tested on an abundant and vagile fish species in a tropical river. Australia’s most widespread freshwater fish, the “extreme disperser” Leiopotherapon unicolor was sampled from six locations in an unregulated system, the Daly River in Australia’s Northern Territory. Despite an expectation of high connectivity based on life history knowledge of this species derived from arid zone habitats, L. unicolor was not...

Data from: Catchment zoning for freshwater conservation: refining plans to enhance action on the ground

Virgilio Hermoso, Lorenzo Cattarino, Mark J. Kennard, Matthew Watts, Simon Linke & Mathew Watts
1. Recent advances in freshwater conservation planning allow addressing some of the specific needs of these systems. These include spatial connectivity or propagation of threats along stream networks, essential to ensure the maintenance of ecosystem processes and the biodiversity they sustain. However, these peculiarities make conservation recommendations difficult to implement as they often require considering large areas that cannot be managed under conventional conservation schemes (e.g. strict protection). 2. To facilitate the implementation of conservation...

Data from: Experimental feeding regime influences urban bird disease dynamics

Josie A. Galbraith, Margaret C. Stanley, Darryl N. Jones & Jacqueline R. Beggs
Wild bird feeding often results in high densities of birds, potentially facilitating transmission of disease. Wild birds are major reservoirs of many zoonotic diseases, and although a number of avian disease outbreaks have been linked to bird feeders, urban bird-feeding and its role in disease systems remains poorly studied. We examined the impacts of typical supplementary feeding practices on the health status of feeder-visiting birds at experimental feeding stations in an urban area of New...

Data from: Spatial prioritisation of EU’s LIFE-Nature program to strengthen the conservation impact of Natura 2000

Virgilio Hermoso, Dani Villero, Miguel Clavero & Lluís Brotons
1. Despite advances in conservation efforts within Europe during recent decades, assessments highlight a need for adequate financing mechanisms to support the Natura 2000 network; the centrepiece of the EU´s Biodiversity Strategy. Besides the need for greater investment (currently only covering a fifth of the estimated cost of the network), better planning for this investment could help better achieve conservation goals. 2. We demonstrate a method that could be used to identify priority Natura 2000...

Data from: Disentangling synergistic disease dynamics: Implications for the viral biocontrol of rabbits

Konstans Wells, Damien A. Fordham, Barry W. Brook, Phillip Cassey, Tarnya Cox, Robert B. O’Hara, Nina I. Schwensow & Robert B. O'Hara
European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) have been exposed to rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) and myxoma virus (MYXV) in their native and invasive ranges for decades. Yet, the long‐term effects of these viruses on rabbit population dynamics remain poorly understood. In this context, we analysed 17 years of detailed capture–mark–recapture data (2000–2016) from Turretfield, South Australia, using a probabilistic state‐space hierarchical modelling framework to estimate rabbit survival and epidemiological dynamics. While RHDV infection and disease‐induced death...

Data from: Upwelling as the major source of nitrogen for shallow and deep reef-building corals across an oceanic atoll system

Veronica Z. Radice, Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Brian Fry, Michael D. Fox & Sophie G. Dove
Oceanographic processes shape coral reefs worldwide by redistributing inorganic nutrients and particulate resources over depth. Deep‐water upwelling occurs frequently in coral reef ecosystems, but its impact on coral nutrition remains unclear. This study investigated the influence of upwelling on the trophic ecology of three common reef‐building corals (Galaxea fascicularis, Pachyseris speciosa and Pocillopora verrucosa) from different reef depths (shallow reef, 10 m, vs. deep reef, 30 m) and reef exposures (oceanic rim vs. Inner Sea)...

Spatial dynamics of pathogen transmission in communally roosting species: Impacts of changing habitats on bat-virus dynamics

Tamika Lunn, Tamika Lunn, Alison Peel, Hamish McCallum, Peggy Eby, Maureen Kessler, Raina Plowright & Olivier Restif
1. The spatial organisation of populations determines their pathogen dynamics. This is particularly important for communally roosting species, whose aggregations are often driven by the spatial structure of their environment. 2. We develop a spatially explicit model for virus transmission within roosts of Australian tree-dwelling bats (Pteropus spp.), parameterised to reflect Hendra virus. The spatial structure of roosts mirrors three study sites, and viral transmission between groups of bats in trees was modelled as a...

Foliar water uptake by coastal wetland plants: a novel water acquisition mechanism in arid and humid subtropical mangroves

Matthew Hayes, Samantha Chapman, Amber Jesse, Elizabeth O'Brien, Adam Langley, Remi Bardou, John Devaney, John Parker & Kyle C. Cavanaugh
1. Climate change alters freshwater availability in many ecosystems leading to shifts in distributions for many plants. Despite living exclusively in intertidal, saline environments, mangroves rely on non-saline water to maintain plant productivity. However, several mangrove species persist in arid environments where non-saline water from rain and groundwater sources are limited. Under these conditions, foliar water uptake from fog and mist may be an important water acquisition strategy. 2. We conducted a field experiment in...

Leukocyte proportions in Pteropus alecto blood smears

Dale Hansen, Brooklin Hunt, Caylee Falvo, Manuel Ruiz-Aravena, Maureen Kessler, Jane Hall, Paul Thompson, Karrie Rose, Devin Jones, Tamika Lunn, Adrienne Dale, Alison Peel & Raina Plowright
The black flying fox (Pteropus alecto) is a natural reservoir for Hendra virus, a paramyxovirus that causes fatal infections in humans and horses in Australia. Increased excretion of Hendra virus by flying foxes has been hypothesized to be associated with physiological or energetic stress in the reservoir hosts. The objective of this study was to explore the leukocyte profiles of wild-caught P. alecto, with a focus on describing the morphology of each cell type to...

Interactions among multiple stressors vary with exposure duration and biological response

Olivia King, Jason Van De Merwe, Max Campbell, Rachael Smith, Michael Warne & Chris Brown
Coastal ecosystems are exposed to multiple anthropogenic stressors. Effective management actions would be better informed from generalised predictions of the individual, combined and interactive effects of multiple stressors; however, few generalities are shared across different meta-analyses. Using an experimental study, we present an approach for analysing regression-based designs with generalised additive models (GAMs) that allowed us to capture non-linear effects of exposure duration and stressor intensity, and access interactions among stressors. We tested the approach...

Global analysis of environmental and socioeconomic factors associated with human burden of environmentally mediated pathogens

Susanne Sokolow, Isabel Jones, Chelsea Wood, Kevin Lafferty, Andres Garchitorena, Skylar Hopkins, Andrea Lund, Andrew MacDonald, Nicole Nova, Chris LeBoa, Alison Peel, Erin Mordecai, Meghan Howard, Julia Buck, David Lopez-Carr, Michele Barry, Matthew Bonds & Giulio De Leo
This repository contains four datasets that support repeatability of the analyses in the Sokolow et al. paper published in Lancet Planetary Health. Descriptions of the four datasets are included in the metadata document. This study found that 80% of pathogen species known to infect humans are environmentally mediated, causing about 40% of contemporary infectious-disease burden (global loss of 130 million years of healthy life annually). More than 91% of this environmentally-mediated disease burden occurs in...

Data from: The linking of plate tectonics and evolutionary divergences

Matthew J. Phillips, Timothy J. Page, Mark De Bruyn, Joel A. Huey, William F. Humphreys, Jane M. Hughes, Scott R. Santos, Daniel J. Schmidt & Jonathan M. Waters
It is exciting to be living at a time when the big questions in biology can be investigated using modern genetics and computing. Bauzà-Ribot et al. take on one of the fundamental drivers of biodiversity, the effect of continental drift in the formation of the world’s biota, employing next-generation sequencing of whole mitochondrial genomes and modern Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analysis. Bauzà-Ribot et al. conclude that vicariance via plate tectonics best explains the genetic divergence...

Data from: Patterns and drivers of aquatic invertebrate diversity across an arid biome

Jenny Davis, Lien Sim, Ross M. Thompson, Adrian Pinder, Jayne Brim Box, Nick P. Murphy, Fran Sheldon, Alejandra Morán-Ordóñez, Paul Sunnucks & Nicholas P. Murphy
Managing and restoring faunal diversity across large areas requires an understanding of the roles of connectivity and dispersal in driving community patterns. We sought to determine the influence of connectivity, water regime, water source, geographical location, and dispersal traits on patterns of aquatic invertebrate diversity across a continent-wide arid biome. We compiled data on freshwater invertebrate assemblages from sites spanning the breadth of arid Australia. Univariate analyses (analysis of variance and rarefaction) revealed that alpha...

Data from: The tendinopathic Achilles tendon does not remain iso-volumetric upon repeated loading: insights from 3D ultrasound

Leila Nuri, Steven J. Obst, Richard Newsham-West & Rod S. Barrett
Mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy (MAT) alters the normal three-dimensional (3D) morphology of the Achilles tendon (AT) at rest and under a single tensile load. However, how MAT changes the 3D morphology of the AT during repeated loading remains unclear. This study compared the AT longitudinal, transverse and volume strains during repeated loading of the tendinopathic AT with those of the contralateral tendon in people with unilateral MAT. Ten adults with unilateral MAT performed 10 successive 25...

Data for: Substantial intraspecific trait variation across a hydrological gradient in northern Australian fishes

Osmar Luiz, Julian Olden, Mark Kennard, David Crook, Michael Douglas, Thor Saunders, Dion Wedd, Brendan Adair & Alison King
Trait-based models of ecological communities and ecosystem functioning often fail to account for intraspecific variation in functional traits, assuming that intraspecific variability is negligible compared to interspecific variability. However, this assumption remains poorly tested across vertebrate animals where past studies routinely describe species according to mean trait values without explicit consideration of individual trait variability. We assessed nine functional traits for 4,254 individuals belonging to 15 freshwater fish species from 11 families in Northern Australia,...

Mangrove sinkholes (cenotes) of the Yucatan Peninsula, a global hotspot of carbon sequestration

Maria Fernanda Adame, Nadia Santini, Olmo Torres-Talamante & Kerrylee Rogers
Mangroves are amongst the most carbon-dense ecosystems on the Planet. The capacity of mangrove forests to accumulate carbon has been assessed and reported at regional, national and global scales. However, small-scale sampling is still revealing ‘hot spots’ of carbon accumulation. This study reports one of these “hotspots” with one of the largest-recorded carbon stocks in the sinkholes (cenotes) of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. We assessed soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks from deep soils (1 to...

Natural disturbance impacts on trade-offs and co-benefits of forest biodiversity and carbon

Martin Mikoláš, Marek Svitok, Radek Bače, Garrett Meigs, William Keeton, Heather Keith, Arne Buechling, Volodymyr Trotsiuk, Kurt Bollmann, Krešimir Begovič, Vojtěch Čada, Oleh Chaskovskyy, Dheeraj Ralhan, Martin Dušátko, Matej Ferenčík, Michal Frankovič, Rhiannon Gloor, Jeňýk Hofmeister, Pavel Janda, Ondrej Kameniar, Daniel Kozák, Jana Lábusová, Linda Majdanová, Thomas Nagel, Jakob Pavlin … & Miroslav Svoboda
With accelerating environmental change, understanding the influence of forest disturbances and trade-offs between biodiversity and carbon dynamics is of high socio-economic importance. Most studies, however, have assessed immediate or short-term effects of disturbance, while long-term impacts remain poorly understood. Here, using a tree-ring-based approach, we modelled the effect of 250 years of disturbances on present-day biodiversity indicators and carbon dynamics in well-preserved European temperate primary forests. Our results indicated that disturbance legacies spanning centuries shaped...

Effects of habitat transitions on rainforest bird communities across an anthropogenic landscape mosaic

Guohualing Huang & Carla Catterall
We compared bird community responses to the habitat transitions of: rainforest-to-pasture conversion, consequent habitat fragmentation, and post-agricultural regeneration, across a landscape mosaic of about 600 km2 in the eastern Australian subtropics. Birds were surveyed in seven habitats: continuous mature rainforest; two size-classes of mature rainforest fragment (4-21 ha, 1-3 ha); regrowth forest patches dominated by a non-native tree (2-20 ha, 30-50 years old); two types of isolated mature trees in pasture; and treeless pasture; with...

Global Diversification Dynamics Since the Jurassic: Low Dispersal and Habitat-Dependent Evolution Explain Hotspots of Diversity and Shell Disparity in River Snails (Viviparidae)

Björn Stelbrink, Romy Richter, Frank Köhler, Frank Riedel, Ellen Strong, Bert Van Bocxlaer, Christian Albrecht, Torsten Hauffe, Timothy Page, David Aldridge, Arthur Bogan, Li-Na Du, Marivene Manuel-Santos, Ristiyanti Marwoto, Alena Shirokaya & Thomas Von Rintelen
The Viviparidae, commonly known as River Snails, is a dominant group of freshwater snails with a nearly worldwide distribution that reaches its highest taxonomic and morphological diversity in Southeast Asia. The rich fossil record is indicative of a probable Middle Jurassic origin on the Laurasian supercontinent where the group started to diversify during the Cretaceous. However, it remains uncertain when and how the biodiversity hotspot in Southeast Asia was formed. Here, we used a comprehensive...

Network analysis reveals underlying syntactic features in a vocally learnt mammalian display, humpback whale song

Jennifer Allen, Ellen Garland, Rebecca Dunlop & Michael Noad
Vocal communication systems have a set of rules that govern the arrangement of acoustic signals, broadly defined as ‘syntax’. However, there is a limited understanding of potentially shared or analogous rules across vocal displays in different taxa. Recent work on songbirds has investigated syntax using network-based modelling. This technique quantifies features such as connectivity (adjacent signals in a sequence) and recurring patterns. Here, we apply network-based modelling to the complex, hierarchically structured songs of humpback...

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