302 Works

Data from: The evolutionary relationships and age of Homo naledi: an assessment using dated Bayesian phylogenetic methods

Mana Dembo, Davorka Radovčić, Heather M. Garvin, Myra F. Laird, Lauren Schroeder, Jill E. Scott, Juliet Brophy, Rebecca R. Ackermann, Charles M. Musiba, Darryl J. De Ruiter, Arne Ø. Mooers, Mark Collard & Chares M. Musiba
Homo naledi is a recently discovered species of fossil hominin from South Africa. A considerable amount is already known about H. naledi but some important questions remain unanswered. Here we report a study that addressed two of them: “Where does H. naledi fit in the hominin evolutionary tree?” and “How old is it?” We used a large supermatrix of craniodental characters for both early and late hominin species and Bayesian phylogenetic techniques to carry out...

Data from: Generalized movement strategies for constrained consumers: ignoring fitness can be adaptive

Theodore E. Galanthay & Samuel M. Flaxman
Movements made by real organisms---such as movements involved in dispersal, migration, and habitat selection---are expected to be suboptimal occasionally due to realistic constraints imposed by incomplete information, perceptual limitations, and stochasticity. Previous theory considering such constraints has shown that movements appropriately conditioned upon habitat or resource characteristics can balance out suboptimal components of movement and thereby lead organisms to ideal free distributions and fitness maxima, whereas movements conditioned upon fitness differentials cannot. These findings suggest...

Data from: Noise pollution filters bird communities based on vocal frequency

Clinton D. Francis, Catherine P. Ortega & Alexander Cruz
BACKGROUND: Human-generated noise pollution now permeates natural habitats worldwide, presenting evolutionarily novel acoustic conditions unprecedented to most landscapes. These acoustics are not only harmful to humans, but threaten wildlife, and especially birds, via changes to species densities, foraging behavior, reproductive success, and predator-prey interactions. Explanations for the negative effects of noise on birds include the disruption of acoustic communication through energetic masking, potentially forcing species that rely upon acoustic communication to abandon otherwise suitable areas....

Data from: Host associated bacterial community succession during amphibian development

Tiffany L. Prest, Abigail K. Kimball, Jordan G. Kueneman & Valerie J. Mckenzie
Amphibians undergo significant developmental changes during their life cycle, as they typically move from a primarily aquatic environment to a more terrestrial one. Amphibian skin is a mucosal tissue that assembles communities of symbiotic microbiota. However, it is currently not well understood as to where amphibians acquire their skin symbionts, and whether the sources of microbial symbionts change throughout development. In this study, we utilized data collected from four wild boreal toad populations (Anaxyrus boreas);...

Data from: Effects of assortative mate choice on the genomic and morphological structure of a hybrid zone between two bird subspecies

Georgy A. Semenov, Elizabeth S.C. Scordato, David R. Khaydarov, Chris C.R. Smith, Nolan C. Kane, Rebecca J. Safran & Elizabeth S. C. Scordato
Phenotypic differentiation plays an important role in the formation and maintenance of reproductive barriers. In some cases, variation in a few key aspects of phenotype can promote and maintain divergence; hence the identification of these traits and their associations with patterns of genomic divergence are crucial for understanding the patterns and processes of population differentiation. We studied hybridization between the alba and personata subspecies of the white wagtail (Motacilla alba), and quantified divergence and introgression...

Data from: Elevational differences in developmental plasticity determine phenological responses of grasshoppers to recent climate warming

Lauren B. Buckley, César R. Nufio, Evan M. Kirk & Joel G. Kingsolver
Annual species may increase reproduction by increasing adult body size through extended development, but risk being unable to complete development in seasonally limited environments. Synthetic reviews indicate that most, but not all, species have responded to recent climate warming by advancing the seasonal timing of adult emergence or reproduction. Here, we show that 50 years of climate change have delayed development in high-elevation, season-limited grasshopper populations, but advanced development in populations at lower elevations. Developmental...

Data from: Treating cattle with antibiotics affects greenhouse gas emissions, and microbiota in dung and dung beetles

Tobin J. Hammer, Noah Fierer, Bess Hardwick, Asko Simojoki, Eleanor Slade, Juhani Taponen, Heidi Viljanen & Tomas Roslin
Antibiotics are routinely used to improve livestock health and growth. However, this practice may have unintended environmental impacts mediated by interactions among the wide range of micro- and macroorganisms found in agroecosystems. For example, antibiotics may alter microbial emissions of greenhouse gases by affecting livestock gut microbiota. Furthermore, antibiotics may affect the microbiota of non-target animals that rely on dung, such as dung beetles, and the ecosystem services they provide. To examine these interactions, we...

Data from: Trace fossils of possible parasites inside the gut contents of a hadrosaurid dinosaur, Upper Cretaceous Judith River Formation, Montana

Justin S. Tweet, Karen Chin & Allan A. Ekdale
Tiny sinuous trace fossils have been found within probable gut contents of an exceptionally preserved specimen of a hadrosaurid dinosaur, Brachylophosaurus canadensis, from the Judith River Formation of Montana. Approximately 280 examples of the trace fossils were observed in 19 samples of gut region material. The tubular structures typically are about 0.3 mm across. Many have thin calcareous linings or layers, and some exhibit fine surficial striae. At least two dozen of these trace fossils...

Data from: Risky business: linking Toxoplasma gondii infection and entrepreneurship behaviours across individuals and countries

Stefanie K. Johnson, Fitza A. Markus, Daniel A. Lerher, Dana M. Calhoun, Marissa A. Beldon, Elsa T. Chan & Pieter T. J. Johnson
Disciplines such as business and economics often rely on the assumption of rationality when explaining complex human behaviours. However, growing evidence suggests that behaviour may concurrently be influenced by infec- tious microorganisms. The protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii, infects an estimated 2 billion people worldwide and has been linked to behavioural alterations in humans and other vertebrates. Here we integrate primary data from college students and business professionals with national-level information on cultural attitudes toward business to...

Data from: Effects of sea ice cover on satellite-detected primary production in the Arctic Ocean

Mati Kahru, Zhongping Lee, Brian Greg Mitchell & Cynthia D. Nevison
The influence of decreasing Arctic sea ice on net primary production (NPP) in the Arctic Ocean has been considered in multiple publications but is not well constrained owing to the potentially large errors in satellite algorithms. In particular, the Arctic Ocean is rich in coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) that interferes in the detection of chlorophyll a concentration of the standard algorithm, which is the primary input to NPP models. We used the quasi-analytic algorithm...

Data from: Spatial variation of the rain-snow temperature threshold across the Northern Hemisphere

Keith S. Jennings, Taylor S. Winchell, Ben Livneh & Noah P. Molotch
We present the first continuous map of rain-snow air temperature thresholds over the Northern Hemisphere land surface, underlining the spatial variability of precipitation phase partitioning. Land surface models typically discriminate between rain and snow using a simple, spatially uniform air temperature threshold, but observations indicate the threshold is not static. Our analysis of a 29-year observational dataset (n = 17.8 million) shows the threshold varies significantly, averaging 1.0°C and ranging from -0.4°C to 2.4°C for...

Data from: Genetic and demographic founder effects have long-term fitness consequences for colonising populations

Marianna Szűcs, Brett A. Melbourne, Ty Tuff, Christopher Weiss-Lehman & Ruth A. Hufbauer
Colonisation is a fundamental ecological and evolutionary process that drives the distribution and abundance of organisms. The initial ability of colonists to establish is determined largely by the number of founders and their genetic background. We explore the importance of these demographic and genetic properties for longer term persistence and adaptation of populations colonising a novel habitat using experimental populations of Tribolium castaneum. We introduced individuals from three genetic backgrounds (inbred – outbred) into a...

Data from: Structure and function of the bacterial and fungal gut microbiota of Neotropical butterflies

Alison Ravenscraft, Michelle Berry, Tobin Hammer, Kabir Peay & Carol Boggs
The relationship between animals and their gut flora is simultaneously one of the most common and most complex symbioses on Earth. Despite its ubiquity, our understanding of this invisible but often critical relationship is still in its infancy. We employed adult Neotropical butterflies as a study system to ask three questions: First, how does gut microbial community composition vary across host individuals, species and dietary guilds? Second, how do gut microbiota compare to food microbial...

Wolves are back: Sociopolitical identity and opinions on management of Canis lupus

Joel Hartter & Lawrence Hamilton
In 2010 an interdisciplinary team of social and natural scientists began a project to study society–environment interactions in northeast Oregon. At first, the Communities and Forests in Oregon (CAFOR) project focused on Baker, Union and Wallowa Counties. Subsequently the project’s scope expanded to cover Crook, Grant, Umatilla and Wheeler Counties. One part of the CAFOR research involved a series of telephone surveys carried out in four stages over 2011 to 2018. The surveys employed consistent...

Bending and Looping of long DNA by Polycomb repressive complex 2 revealed by AFM imaging in liquid

Patrick Heenan, Anne Gooding, Xueyin Wang, Thomas Perkins & Thomas Cech
Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is a histone methyltransferase that methylates histone H3 at Lysine 27. PRC2 is critical for epigenetic gene silencing, cellular differentiation, and the formation of facultative heterochromatin. It can also promote or inhibit oncogenesis. Despite this importance, the molecular mechanisms by which PRC2 compacts chromatin are relatively understudied. Here, we visualized the binding of PRC2 to naked DNA in liquid at the single-molecule level using atomic force microscopy. Analysis of the...

Data from: A quantitative inventory of yeast P body proteins reveals principles of composition and specificity

Wenmin Xing, Denise Muhlrad, Roy Parker & Michael K. Rosen
P bodies are archetypal biomolecular condensates that concentrate proteins and RNA without a surrounding membrane. While dozens of P body proteins are known, the concentrations of components in the compartment have not been measured. We used live cell imaging to generate a quantitative inventory of the major proteins in yeast P bodies. Only 7 proteins are highly concentrated in P bodies (5.1-15 uM); the 24 others examined are appreciably lower (most ≤ 2.6 uM). P...

Data from: A trait-based approach to assessing resistance and resilience to wildfire in two iconic North American conifers

Kyle Rodman, Thomas Veblen, Robert Andrus, Neil Enright, Joseph Fontaine, Angela Gonzalez, Miranda Redmond & Andreas Wion
Ongoing changes in fire activity have the potential to drive widespread shifts in Earth’s vegetation. Plant traits and vital rates can be indicators of the ability of individuals to survive fire (resistance) and populations to persist (resilience) following fire and provide a method to assess vulnerability to fire-driven vegetation shifts. In 15 study sites spanning climatic gradients in the southern Rocky Mountains, U.S.A., we quantified variation in key traits and vital rates of two co-occurring,...

E. coli aminoglycoside treatment

Joel Kralj & Giancarlo Bruni
Aminoglycosides are broad-spectrum antibiotics whose mechanism of action is under debate. It is widely accepted that membrane voltage potentiates aminoglycoside activity, which is ascribed to voltage-dependent drug uptake. In this paper, we measured the response of Escherichia coli treated with aminoglycosides and discovered that the bactericidal action arises not from the downstream effects of voltage dependent drug uptake, but rather directly from dysregulated membrane potential. In the absence of voltage, aminoglycosides are taken into cells...

Age predicts risky investment better than residual reproductive value

David Delaney, Luke Hoekstra & Fredric Janzen
Life-history theory predicts that investment into reproduction should increase as future reproductive opportunities (i.e., residual reproductive value, RRV) decrease. Researchers have thus intuitively used age as a proxy for RRV and assume RRV decreases with age when interpreting age-specific investment. Yet, age is an imperfect proxy for RRV and may even be a poor correlate in some systems. We used a 30-year study of the nesting ecology of painted turtles ( Chrysemys picta ) to...

Data for: Dorsal premammillary projection to periaqueductal gray controls escape vigor from innate and conditioned threats

Peter Schuette, Weisheng Wang, Mimi La-Vu, Brooke Tobias, Marta Ceko, Philip Kragel, Fernando Reis, Shiyu Ji, Megha Sehgal, Sandra Maesta-Pereira, Meghmik Chakerian, Alcino Silva, Newton Canteras, Tor Wager, Jonathan Kao & Avishek Adhikari
Escape from threats has paramount importance for survival. However, it is unknown if a single circuit controls escape from innate and conditioned threats. The hypothalamic dorsal premammillary nucleus (PMd) may control escape, as it is strongly activated by escape-inducing threats and projects to the region most implicated in escape, the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG). We show that in mice cholecystokinin (cck)-expressing PMd cells are activated during escape, but not other defensive behaviors. PMd-cck ensemble activity...

Host controls of within-host disease dynamics: insight from an invertebrate system

Tara Stewart Merrill, Zoi Rapti & Carla Cáceres
Within-host processes (representing the entry, establishment, growth and development of a parasite inside its host) may play a key role in parasite transmission but remain challenging to observe and quantify. We develop a general model for measuring host defenses and within-host disease dynamics. Our stochastic model breaks the infection process down into the stages of parasite exposure, entry, and establishment and provides associated probabilities for a host’s ability to resist infections with barriers and clear...

Dispersers and environment drive global variation in fruit color syndromes

Miranda Sinnott-Armstrong, Michael Donoghue & Walter Jetz
The colors of fleshy fruits play a critical role in plant dispersal by advertising ripe fruits to consumers. Fruit colors have long been classified into syndromes attributed to selection by animal dispersers, despite weak evidence for this hypothesis. Here, we test the relative importance of biotic (bird and mammal frugivory) and abiotic (wet season temperatures, growing season length, and UV-B radiation) factors in determining fruit color syndrome in 3,163 species of fleshy-fruited plants. We find...

Plant-pollinator interactions between generalists persist over time and space

Julian Resasco, Natacha Chacoff & Diego Vázquez
Generalist species are the linchpins of networks, as they are important for maintaining network structure and function. Previous studies have shown that interactions between generalists tend to occur consistently across years and sites. However, the link between temporal and spatial interaction persistence across scales remains unclear. To address this gap, we collected data on plant-pollinator interactions throughout the flowering period for five years across six plots in a subalpine meadow in the Rocky Mountains. We...

Data from: Water the odds? Spring rainfall and emergence-related seed traits drive plant recruitment

Julie Larson, Kathleen Ebinger & Katharine Suding
Recruitment of new individuals from seed is a critical component of plant community assembly and reassembly, especially in the context of ecosystem disturbance and recovery. While frameworks typically aim to predict how communities will be filtered on the basis of traits influencing established plant responses to the environment, assembly from seed is more complex: the responses of seeds (affected by dormancy and germination function) and establishing plants (affected by root and leaf function) can both...

A highly invasive malaria parasite has expanded its range to non-migratory birds in North America

Angela Theodosopoulos, Kathryn Grabenstein, Staffan Bensch & Scott Taylor
Parasite range expansions are a direct consequence of globalization and are an increasing threat to biodiversity. Here we report a recent range expansion of the SGS1 strain of a highly invasive parasite, Plasmodium relictum, to two non-migratory passerines in North America. Plasmodium relictum is considered one of the world’s most invasive parasites and causes the disease avian malaria: this is the first reported case of SGS1 in wild birds of Western North America and wild...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    60
  • 2020
    59
  • 2019
    22
  • 2018
    32
  • 2017
    40
  • 2016
    28
  • 2015
    19
  • 2014
    21
  • 2013
    11
  • 2012
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    302

Affiliations

  • University of Colorado Boulder
    299
  • Colorado State University
    10
  • University of Washington
    9
  • University of California, Berkeley
    8
  • Duke University
    7
  • University of Florida
    7
  • University of British Columbia
    7
  • Cornell University
    7
  • University of California, Davis
    6
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    5