40 Works

Data from: Whole genome amplification and reduced-representation genome sequencing of Schistosoma japonicum miracidia

Jonathan A. Shortt, Daren C. Card, Drew R. Schield, Yang Liu, Bo Zhong, Todd A. Castoe, Elizabeth J. Carlton & David D. Pollock
Background: In areas where schistosomiasis control programs have been implemented, morbidity and prevalence have been greatly reduced. However, to sustain these reductions and move towards interruption of transmission, new tools for disease surveillance are needed. Genomic methods have the potential to help trace the sources of new infections, and allow us to monitor drug resistance. Large-scale genotyping efforts for schistosome species have been hindered by cost, limited numbers of established target loci, and the small...

Data from: The lichens and allied fungi of Mount Mitchell State Park, North Carolina: a first checklist with comprehensive keys and comparison to historical data

James C. Lendemer, Carly R. Anderson Stewart, Betty Besa, Jim Goldsmith, Haley Griffith, Jordan R. Hoffman, Betsy Kraus, Paula LaPoint, Lin Li, Zachary Muscavitch, Joel Schultz, Rebecca Schultz & Jessica L. Allen
A total of 171 species of lichens and allied fungi are reported from the spruce-fir forests of Mount Mitchell State Park, in the Black Mountains of North Carolina, based on both historical and modern records. Comparison of the modern baseline with the historical macrolichen baseline generated in the 1970s revealed potential losses of high-elevation southern Appalachian endemics (2 species), cyanolichens (5 species), species typical of exposed rock outcrops (1 species), and widespread species typical of...

Data from: Experimental investigation of alternative transmission functions: quantitative evidence for the importance of non-linear transmission dynamics in host-parasite systems

Sarah A. Orlofske, Samuel M. Flaxman, Maxwell B. Joseph, Andy Fenton, Brett A. Melbourne & Pieter T. J. Johnson
1. Understanding pathogen transmission is crucial for predicting and managing disease. Nonetheless, experimental comparisons of alternative functional forms of transmission remain rare, and those experiments that are conducted are often not designed to test the full range of possible forms. 2. To differentiate among ten candidate transmission functions, we used a novel experimental design in which we independently varied four factors—duration of exposure, numbers of parasites, numbers of hosts, and parasite density—in laboratory infection experiments....

Data from: Generalist predator's niche shifts reveal ecosystem changes in an experimentally fragmented landscape

Julian Resasco, Kika T. Tuff, Saul A. Cunningham, Brett A. Melbourne, Andrew L. Hicks, Seth D. Newsome & Kendi F. Davies
Habitat fragmentation can alter the trophic structure of communities and environmental conditions, thus driving changes in biodiversity and ecosystem functions. Quantifying niches of generalist predators can reveal how fragmentation alters ecosystems. In a habitat fragmentation experiment, we used stable isotopes of a generalist predator skink to test predictions from spatial theory on trophic structure and to quantify abiotic changes associated with fragmentation among continuous forest, fragments, and matrix habitats. We predicted that in fragments and...

Data from: A comparative approach to cooperative transport in ants: individual persistence correlates with group coordination

Helen F. McCreery
When groups of ants work together to carry large objects—called cooperative transport—they must form consensus on a travel direction. In many species, groups are unsuccessful at this decision, and deadlock. In other collective decisions, including nest-site selection in honeybees, individuals’ enthusiasm or recruitment intensity for a given option affects the selection process. A similar mechanism may be important during cooperative transport in ants and may account for coordination differences among species. Results from theoretical models...

Data from: Identifying environmental drivers of greenhouse gas emissions under warming and reduced rainfall in boreal-temperate forests

Catarina S. C. Martins, Loïc Nazaries, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, Catriona A. Macdonald, Ian C. Anderson, Sarah E. Hobbie, Rhodney T. Venterea, Peter B. Reich, Brajesh K. Singh & Rodney T. Venterea
1.Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are predicted to increase as a consequence of fossil fuel emissions and the impact on biosphere-atmosphere interactions. Forest ecosystems in general, and forest soils in particular, can be sinks or sources for CO2, CH4, and N2O. Environmental studies traditionally target soil temperature and moisture as the main predictors of soil greenhouse gas (GHG) flux from different ecosystems; however, these emissions are primarily biologically...

Data from: Livestock activity increases exotic plant richness, but wildlife increases native richness, with stronger effects under low productivity

David J. Eldridge, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, Samantha K. Travers, James Val, Ian Oliver, Josh W. Dorrough & Santiago Soliveres
1.Grazing by domestic livestock is one of the most widespread land uses worldwide, particularly in rangelands, where it co-occurs with grazing by wild herbivores. Grazing effects on plant diversity are likely to depend on intensity of grazing, herbivore type, coevolution with plants and prevailing environmental conditions. 2.We collected data on climate, plant productivity, soil properties, grazing intensity and herbivore type; and measured their effects on plant species richness from 451 sites across 0.4 M km2...

Data from: RADseq dataset with 90% missing data fully resolves recent radiation of Petalidium (Acanthaceae) in the ultra-arid deserts of Namibia

Erin A. Tripp, Yi-Hsin Erica Tsai, Yongbin Zhuang & Kyle G. Dexter
Deserts, even those at tropical latitudes, often have strikingly low levels of plant diversity, particularly within genera. One remarkable exception to this pattern is the genus Petalidium (Acanthaceae), in which 37 of 40 named species occupy one of the driest environments on Earth, the Namib Desert of Namibia and neighboring Angola. To contribute to understanding this enigmatic diversity, we generated RADseq data for 47 accessions of Petalidium representing 22 species. We explored the impacts of...

Data from: Feces nitrogen release induced by different large herbivores in a dry grassland

Jingzhi Wang, Deli Wang, Chunqiang Li, Timothy R. Seastedt, Cunzhu Liang, Ling Wang, Wei Sun, Maowei Liang & Yu Li
Large herbivores have pronounced effects on nutrient cycling in grasslands. These organisms are known to alter the quality and quantity of plant production as well as the amounts and quality of plant litter and animal wastes. The generalization that the relative quality of detritus inputs is enhanced by herbivores is well known, but how this process is affected by diet selection processing and feces production of different large herbivores remains largely unstudied. Here, we measured...

Data from: Convergent evolution of floral shape tied to pollinator shifts in Iochrominae (Solanaceae)

Stacey D. Smith & Ricardo Kriebel
Flower form is one of many floral features thought to be shaped by pollinator-mediated selection. Although the drivers of variation in flower shape have often been examined in microevolutionary studies, relatively few have tested the relationship between shape evolution and shifts in pollination system across clades. In the present study, we use morphometric approaches to quantify shape variation across the Andean clade Iochrominae and estimate the relationship between changes in shape and shifts in pollination...

Vegetation Change in the Natural Reserve of Orange County

Katherine Suding, Sara Jo Dickens & Samuel Bedgood
This data set describes vegetation change in 109 areas in the Nature Reserve of Orange County. The authors of this data were mainly interested in the success of artichoke thistle (Cynara cardunculus) control, but it could be approached in many different ways. Surveyors identified and recorded more than 375 plant species from the years 1998, 2008, and 2013.

GEOS-Chem output for \"Lightning NOx Emissions: Reconciling measured and modeled emissions estimates with updated NOx chemistry\"

Joshua Laughner, Ronald Cohen & Benjamin Nault
These GEOS-Chem simulations examine the effect of recent advances to our understanding of upper tropospheric chemistry on our ability to constrain lightning NOx emissions. These simulations examine the effect of the addition of methyl peroxy nitrate chemistry, as well as better constraints on the formation of pernitric acid, dinitrogen pentoxide, and nitric acid at the temperatures and pressures of the upper troposphere. These simulations include a base case, simulations implementing each change individually, all four...

Data from: Declines in low-elevation subalpine tree populations outpace growth in high-elevation populations with warming

Erin Conlisk, Cristina Castanha, Matthew J. Germino, Thomas T. Veblen, Jeremy M. Smith & Lara M. Kueppers
1. Species distribution shifts in response to climate change require that recruitment increase beyond current range boundaries. For trees with long lifespans, the importance of climate-sensitive seedling establishment to the pace of range shifts has not been demonstrated quantitatively. 2. Using spatially explicit, stochastic population models combined with data from long-term forest surveys, we explored whether the climate-sensitivity of recruitment observed in climate manipulation experiments was sufficient to alter populations and elevation ranges of two...

Data from: Evaluating the impact of domestication and captivity on the horse gut microbiome

Jessica L. Metcalf, Se Jin Song, James T. Morton, Sophie Weiss, Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Frédéric Joly, Claudia Feh, Pierre Taberlet, Eric Coissac, Amnon Amir, Eske Willerslev, Rob Knight, Valerie McKenzie & Ludovic Orlando
The mammal gut microbiome, which includes host microbes and their respective genes, is now recognized as an essential second genome that provides critical functions to the host. In humans, studies have revealed that lifestyle strongly influences the composition and diversity of the gastrointestinal microbiome. We hypothesized that these trends in humans may be paralleled in mammals subjected to anthropogenic forces such as domestication and captivity, in which diets and natural life histories are often greatly...

Data from: Compromised external validity: federally produced cannabis does not reflect legal markets

Daniela Vergara, L. Cinnamon Bidwell, Reggie Gaudino, Anthony Torres, Gary Du, Travis C. Ruthenburg, Kymron DeCesare, Donald P. Land, Kent E. Hutchison & Nolan C. Kane
As the most widely used illicit drug worldwide, and as a source of numerous under-studied pharmacologically-active compounds, a precise understanding of variability in psychological and physiological effects of Cannabis varieties is essential. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is designated as the sole legal producer of Cannabis for use in US research studies. We sought to compare the chemical profiles of Cannabis varieties that are available to consumers in states that have state-legalized use...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    40

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    40

Affiliations

  • University of Colorado Boulder
    40
  • University of California, Berkeley
    4
  • Colorado State University
    4
  • University of California System
    3
  • Institute of Systematics and Ecology of Animals
    2
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University of California, San Diego
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    2