59 Works

Bending and Looping of long DNA by Polycomb repressive complex 2 revealed by AFM imaging in liquid

Patrick Heenan, Anne Gooding, Xueyin Wang, Thomas Perkins & Thomas Cech
Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is a histone methyltransferase that methylates histone H3 at Lysine 27. PRC2 is critical for epigenetic gene silencing, cellular differentiation, and the formation of facultative heterochromatin. It can also promote or inhibit oncogenesis. Despite this importance, the molecular mechanisms by which PRC2 compacts chromatin are relatively understudied. Here, we visualized the binding of PRC2 to naked DNA in liquid at the single-molecule level using atomic force microscopy. Analysis of the...

Toward Entrainment Thresholds in Fluvial Plucking

Aaron Hurst
The data in this repository were generated using COMSOL Multiphysics 5.5 CFD package. The files are in .dat format for u-component velocities, pressures, and location of the zero-pressure contour line. Each file includes a heading describing the run-file used and date/time and labels for each column of data. Additionally, a .csv file contains the data used for the calculations of pressure variations and Froude numbers.

CMIP5 Zonal Velocity Sections Along 93°W (3°S–3°N, 0–500 m)

Kristopher Karnauskas
This data set is part of the larger Repeat Observations by Gliders in the Equatorial Region (ROGER) data set available here: https://doi.org/10.25810/pk4z-n050. ROGER was an NSF-funded project from 2012–2016 (OCE–1233282 and OCE–1232971). This page provides access to the data analyzed in the following publication: Karnauskas, K. B., J. Jakoboski, T. M. S. Johnston, W. B. Owens, D. L. Rudnick, and R. E. Todd (2020) The Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent in Three Generations of Global Climate Models...

CMIP6 Potential Temperature Sections Along 93°W (3°S–3°N, 0–500 m)

Kristopher Karnauskas
This data set is part of the larger Repeat Observations by Gliders in the Equatorial Region (ROGER) data set available here: https://doi.org/10.25810/pk4z-n050. ROGER was an NSF-funded project from 2012–2016 (OCE–1233282 and OCE–1232971). This page provides access to the data analyzed in the following publication: Karnauskas, K. B., J. Jakoboski, T. M. S. Johnston, W. B. Owens, D. L. Rudnick, and R. E. Todd (2020) The Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent in Three Generations of Global Climate Models...

Wolves are back: Sociopolitical identity and opinions on management of Canis lupus

Joel Hartter & Lawrence Hamilton
In 2010 an interdisciplinary team of social and natural scientists began a project to study society–environment interactions in northeast Oregon. At first, the Communities and Forests in Oregon (CAFOR) project focused on Baker, Union and Wallowa Counties. Subsequently the project’s scope expanded to cover Crook, Grant, Umatilla and Wheeler Counties. One part of the CAFOR research involved a series of telephone surveys carried out in four stages over 2011 to 2018. The surveys employed consistent...

E. coli aminoglycoside treatment

Joel Kralj & Giancarlo Bruni
Aminoglycosides are broad-spectrum antibiotics whose mechanism of action is under debate. It is widely accepted that membrane voltage potentiates aminoglycoside activity, which is ascribed to voltage-dependent drug uptake. In this paper, we measured the response of Escherichia coli treated with aminoglycosides and discovered that the bactericidal action arises not from the downstream effects of voltage dependent drug uptake, but rather directly from dysregulated membrane potential. In the absence of voltage, aminoglycosides are taken into cells...

Data from: A trait-based approach to assessing resistance and resilience to wildfire in two iconic North American conifers

Kyle Rodman, Thomas Veblen, Robert Andrus, Neil Enright, Joseph Fontaine, Angela Gonzalez, Miranda Redmond & Andreas Wion
Ongoing changes in fire activity have the potential to drive widespread shifts in Earth’s vegetation. Plant traits and vital rates can be indicators of the ability of individuals to survive fire (resistance) and populations to persist (resilience) following fire and provide a method to assess vulnerability to fire-driven vegetation shifts. In 15 study sites spanning climatic gradients in the southern Rocky Mountains, U.S.A., we quantified variation in key traits and vital rates of two co-occurring,...

Data from: A quantitative inventory of yeast P body proteins reveals principles of composition and specificity

Wenmin Xing, Denise Muhlrad, Roy Parker & Michael K. Rosen
P bodies are archetypal biomolecular condensates that concentrate proteins and RNA without a surrounding membrane. While dozens of P body proteins are known, the concentrations of components in the compartment have not been measured. We used live cell imaging to generate a quantitative inventory of the major proteins in yeast P bodies. Only 7 proteins are highly concentrated in P bodies (5.1-15 uM); the 24 others examined are appreciably lower (most ≤ 2.6 uM). P...

Who is (not) protected by Title IX? A critical review of 45 years of research [supplementary tables]

Mary Quantz & Elizabeth Jackson Meyer
Background/Context: This dataset consists of the supplementary tables from the first published systematic literature review with an exclusive focus on Title IX scholarship. The article associated with this data aims to offer a holistic view of the existing knowledge base in this field presented in peer-reviewed scholarly publications. Purpose: This review of the literature [in the paper associated with these tables] identifies key trends in this body of research and highlights strengths as well as...

Weather variation affects the dispersal of grasshoppers beyond their elevational ranges

Cesar Nufio, Andrew Prinster & Julian Resasco
Understanding how abiotic conditions influence dispersal patterns of organisms is important for understanding the degree to which species can track and persist in the face of changing climate. The goal of this study was to understand how weather conditions (temperature, precipitation and wind patterns) influence the dispersal patterns of multiple non-migratory grasshopper species from lower elevation grassland habitats in which they ­­complete their life-cycles to higher elevations that extend beyond their range limits. The study...

Age predicts risky investment better than residual reproductive value

David Delaney, Luke Hoekstra & Fredric Janzen
Life-history theory predicts that investment into reproduction should increase as future reproductive opportunities (i.e., residual reproductive value, RRV) decrease. Researchers have thus intuitively used age as a proxy for RRV and assume RRV decreases with age when interpreting age-specific investment. Yet, age is an imperfect proxy for RRV and may even be a poor correlate in some systems. We used a 30-year study of the nesting ecology of painted turtles ( Chrysemys picta ) to...

Data from: A synthesis of the effects of cheatgrass invasion on U.S. Great Basin carbon storage

R Chelsea Nagy, Emily Fusco, Jennifer Balch, John Finn, Adam Mahood, Jenica Allen & Bethany Bradley
Non-native, invasive Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) is pervasive in sagebrush ecosystems in the Great Basin ecoregion of the western U.S., competing with native plants and promoting more frequent fires. As a result, cheatgrass invasion likely alters carbon (C) storage in the region. Many studies have measured C pools in one or more common vegetation types: native sagebrush, invaded sagebrush, and cheatgrass-dominated (often burned) sites, but these results have yet to be synthesized. We performed a literature...

Data from: An isolated white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population on St. John, US Virgin Islands shows low inbreeding and comparable heterozygosity to other larger populations

Scott Taylor, Suzanne Nelson & Jon Reuter
This is the first study to document the genetic diversity of the white-tailed deer population on St. John, US Virgin Islands. The island population was founded by a small number of animals, has very limited hunting or predation, and recently experienced a reduction in size following an extended drought in 2015. DNA samples were collected from hair from 23 anesthetized adult deer (13 males, 10 females) ranging in age from 1-8 years (3.36+ 1.9 yr)...

The impact of urbanization on body size of Barn Swallows Hirundo rustica gutturalis

Yanyan Zhao, Yu Liu, Elizabeth Scordato, Myung-Bok Lee, Xiaoying Xing, Xinyuan Pan, Yang Liu, Rebecca Safran & Emilio Pagani-Núñez
Urbanization implies a dramatic impact on ecosystems, which may lead to drastic phenotypic differences between urban and non-urban individuals. For instance, urbanization is associated with increased metabolic costs, which may constrain body size, but urbanization also leads to habitat fragmentation, which may favour increases in body mass when for instance it correlates with dispersal capacity. However, this apparent contradiction has rarely been studied. This is particularly evident in China where the urbanization process is currently...

Adaptation to viscous Snowball Earth Oceans is a path to complex multicellularity

Carl Simpson
Animals, fungi, and algae with complex multicellular bodies all evolved independently from unicellular ancestors. The early history of these major eukaryotic multicellular clades, if not their origins, co-occur with an extreme phase of global glaciations known as the Snowball Earth. Here, I propose that the long-term loss of low viscosity environments due to several rounds global glaciation drove the multiple origins of complex multicellularity in eukaryotes and the subsequent radiation of complex multicellular groups. Under...

Identifying functional impacts of heat-resistant fungi on boreal forest recovery after wildfire

Nicola Day, Steve Cumming, Kari Dunfield, Jill Johnstone, Michelle Mack, Kirsten Reid, Merritt Turetsky, Xanthe Walker & Jennifer Baltzer
Fungi play key roles in carbon (C) dynamics of ecosystems: saprotrophs decompose organic material and return C in the nutrient cycle, and mycorrhizal species support plants that accumulate C through photosynthesis. The identities and functions of extremophile fungi present after fire can influence C dynamics, particularly because plant-fungal relationships are often species-specific. However, little is known about the function and distribution of fungi that survive fires. We aim to assess the distribution of heat-resistant soil...

CMIP6 Salinity Sections Along 93°W (3°S–3°N, 0–500 m)

Kristopher Karnauskas
This data set is part of the larger Repeat Observations by Gliders in the Equatorial Region (ROGER) data set available here: https://doi.org/10.25810/pk4z-n050. ROGER was an NSF-funded project from 2012–2016 (OCE–1233282 and OCE–1232971). This page provides access to the data analyzed in the following publication: Karnauskas, K. B., J. Jakoboski, T. M. S. Johnston, W. B. Owens, D. L. Rudnick, and R. E. Todd (2020) The Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent in Three Generations of Global Climate Models...

Phylogenomic data reveal widespred introgression across the range of an alpine and arctic specialist

Erik Funk, Garth Spellman, Kevin Winker, Jack Withrow, Erika Zavaleta, Kristen Ruegg & Scott Taylor
Understanding how gene flow affects population divergence and speciation remains challenging. Differentiating one evolutionary process from another can be difficult because multiple processes can produce similar patterns, and more than one process can occur simultaneously. While simple population models produce predictable results, how these processes balance in taxa with patchy distributions and complicated natural histories is less certain. These types of populations might be highly connected through migration (gene flow), but can experience stronger effects...

Data from: Body temperature, heart rate, and activity patterns of two boreal homeotherms in winter: homeostasis, allostasis, and ecological coexistence

Allyson Menzies, Emily Studd, Yasmine Majchrzak, Michael Peers, Stan Boutin, Ben Dantzer, Jeffrey Lane, Andrew McAdam & Murray Humphries
Organisms survive environmental variation by combining homeostatic regulation of critical states with allostatic variation of other traits, and species differences in these responses can contribute to coexistence in temporally-variable environments. In this paper, we simultaneously record variation in three functional traits – body temperature (Tb), heart rate, and activity - in relation to three forms of environmental variation – air temperature (Ta), photoperiod, and experimentally-manipulated resource levels – in free-ranging snowshoe hares and North American...

CMIP3 Zonal Velocity Volumes Near the Equator (3°S–3°N, 160°E–80°W, 0–400 m)

Kristopher Karnauskas
ROGER was an NSF-funded project from 2012–2016 (OCE–1233282 and OCE–1232971). This page provides access to the data analyzed in the following publication: Karnauskas, K. B., J. Jakoboski, T. M. S. Johnston, W. B. Owens, D. L. Rudnick, and R. E. Todd (2020) The Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent in Three Generations of Global Climate Models and Glider Observations. J. Geophys. Res.–Oceans, in revision. As described in the paper, all CMIP3, CMIP5 and CMIP6 global climate model outputs...

Modeling cannabinoids from a large-scale sample of Cannabis sativa chemotypes

Daniela Vergara, Reggie Gaudino, Thomas Blank & Brian Keegan
The widespread legalization of Cannabis has opened the industry to using contemporary analytical techniques for chemotype analysis. Chemotypic data has been collected on a large variety of oil profiles inherent to the cultivars that are commercially available. The unknown gene regulation and pharmacokinetics of dozens of cannabinoids offer opportunities of high interest in pharmacology research. Retailers in many medical and recreational jurisdictions are typically required to report chemical concentrations of at least some cannabinoids. Commercial...

Dynamic shifts in social network structure and composition within a breeding hybrid population

David Zonana, Jennifer Gee, Michael Breed & Daniel Doak
1. Mating behavior and the timing of reproduction can inhibit genetic exchange between closely related species; however, these reproductive barriers are challenging to measure within natural populations. Social network analysis provides promising tools for studying the social context of hybridization, and the exchange of genetic variation, more generally. 2. We test how social networks within a hybrid population of California (Callipepla californica) and Gambel’s quail (Callipepla gambelii) change over discrete periods of a breeding season....

Data from \"2020 State of Open at the University of Colorado Boulder\" Report

Andrew Johnson, Ryan Caillet & Melissa Cantrell
Data from the "2020 State of Open at the University of Colorado Boulder" report, including CSV files containing data about all articles published in full open access (OA) journals by University of Colorado Boulder (CU Boulder) authors in 2019, all articles funded by the CU Boulder Libraries Open Access Fund from 2013 to 2019, and all published data sets reported by CU Boulder faculty members in the Faculty Report of Professional Activities from 2014 to...

Disease's hidden death toll: Using parasite aggregation patterns to quantify landscape-level host mortality in a wildlife system

Mark Wilber, Cheryl Briggs & Pieter Johnson
Worldwide, infectious diseases represent a major source of mortality in humans and livestock. For wildlife populations, disease-induced mortality is likely even greater, but remains notoriously difficult to estimate -- especially for endemic infections. Approaches for quantifying wildlife mortality due to endemic infections have historically been limited by an inability to directly observe wildlife mortality in nature. Here, we address a question that can rarely be answered for endemic pathogens of wildlife: what are the population-...

Data from: Translocation with targeted vaccination is the most effective strategy to protect an island endemic bird threatened by West Nile virus

Victoria Bakker, T. Sillett, Walter Boyce, Daniel Doak, T. Winston Vickers, William Reisen, Brian Cohen, Michael Hallworth & Scott Morrison
Aim Invasive pathogens are a growing conservation challenge and often occur in tandem with rapid environmental transformation, such as climate change, drought, and habitat loss. Climate change appears to have facilitated the spread of West Nile virus (WNV), a cause of widespread avian mortality. WNV is considered the primary threat to island scrub-jays (Aphelocoma insularis), endemic to Santa Cruz Island, California. Two approaches have been proposed to safeguard island scrub-jays: (1) vaccination and (2) conservation...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    59

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    59

Affiliations

  • University of Colorado Boulder
    59
  • Northern Arizona University
    3
  • Wilfrid Laurier University
    2
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    2
  • University of Saskatchewan
    2
  • Oklahoma State University
    2
  • University of Nevada Reno
    2
  • Auckland University of Technology
    2
  • Montana State University
    2
  • Cornell University
    2