59 Works

CMIP5 Zonal Velocity Volumes Near the Equator (3°S–3°N, 160°E–80°W, 0–400 m)

Kristopher Karnauskas
This data set is part of the larger Repeat Observations by Gliders in the Equatorial Region (ROGER) data set available here: https://doi.org/10.25810/pk4z-n050. ROGER was an NSF-funded project from 2012–2016 (OCE–1233282 and OCE–1232971). This page provides access to the data analyzed in the following publication: Karnauskas, K. B., J. Jakoboski, T. M. S. Johnston, W. B. Owens, D. L. Rudnick, and R. E. Todd (2020) The Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent in Three Generations of Global Climate Models...

CMIP3 Zonal Velocity Sections Along 93°W (3°S–3°N, 0–500 m)

Kristopher Karnauskas
This data set is part of the larger Repeat Observations by Gliders in the Equatorial Region (ROGER) data set available here: https://doi.org/10.25810/pk4z-n050. ROGER was an NSF-funded project from 2012–2016 (OCE–1233282 and OCE–1232971). This page provides access to the data analyzed in the following publication: Karnauskas, K. B., J. Jakoboski, T. M. S. Johnston, W. B. Owens, D. L. Rudnick, and R. E. Todd (2020) The Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent in Three Generations of Global Climate Models...

Dataset associated with Floodplain large wood and organic matter jam formation after a large flood: investigating the influence of floodplain forest stand characteristics and river corridor morphology

K.B. Lininger, J.E. Scamardo & M.R. Guiney
This dataset is associated with the article in review titled, "Floodplain large wood and organic matter jam formation after a large flood: investigating the influence of floodplain forest stand characteristics and river corridor morphology." The controls on LW and CPOM deposition on floodplains have rarely been assessed, and there are relatively few studies that explore the bi-directional interactions between wood, standing trees, and geomorphic processes. We use field data from West Creek, Colorado, to assess...

Dataset associated with floodplain large wood and organic matter jam formation after a large flood: investigating the influence of floodplain forest stand characteristics and river corridor morphology

Lina E. Polvi & Katherine Lininger
River corridors play an important role in the carbon cycle as sites of carbon transport, storage, and transformation. Floodplain soil organic carbon (OC) and dead, downed large wood (LW) are two of the largest OC stocks in rivers. Human modifications of river corridors, such as damming and floodplain land-use change, have likely modified floodplain OC storage and retention. We measured floodplain soil OC and downed LW loads on three rivers in northern Sweden that display...

Murine polyomavirus DNA transitions through spatially distinct nuclear replication subdomains during infection

Douglas Peters & Robert Garcea
The replication of small DNA viruses requires both host DNA replication and repair factors that are often recruited to subnuclear domains termed viral replication centers (VRCs). Aside from serving as a spatial focus for viral replication, little is known about these dynamic areas in the nucleus. We investigated the organization and function of VRCs during murine polyomavirus (MuPyV) infection using 3D structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM). We localized MuPyV replication center components, such as the viral...

Interspecific competition slows range expansion and shapes range boundaries

Geoffrey Legault, Matthew Bitters, Alan Hastings & Brett Melbourne
Species expanding into new habitats as a result of climate change or human introductions will frequently encounter resident competitors. Theoretical models suggest that such interspecific competition can alter the speed of expansion and the shape of expanding range boundaries. However, competitive interactions are rarely considered when forecasting the success or speed of expansion, in part because there has been no direct experimental evidence that competition affects either expansion speed or boundary shape. Here we demonstrate...

Data from: A changing climate is snuffing out post-fire recovery in montane forests

Kyle Rodman, Thomas Veblen, Mike Battaglia, Marin Chambers, Paula Fornwalt, Zachary Holden, Thomas Kolb, Jessica Ouzts & Monica Rother
Aim: Climate warming is increasing fire activity in many of Earth’s forested ecosystems. Because fire is an important catalyst for change, investigation of post-fire vegetation response is crucial for understanding the potential for future conversions from forest to non-forest vegetation types. To better understand effects of wildfire and climate warming on forest recovery, we assessed the extent to which climate and terrain influence spatiotemporal variation in past and future post-fire tree regeneration. Location: Montane forests,...

Data from: Phenological synchrony shapes pathology in host–parasite systems

Travis McDevitt-Galles, Wynne E. Moss, Dana M. Calhoun & Pieter T. J. Johnson
A key challenge surrounding ongoing climate shifts is to identify how they alter species interactions, including those between hosts and parasites. Because transmission often occurs during critical time windows, shifts in the phenology of either taxa can alter the likelihood of interaction or the resulting pathology. We quantified how phenological synchrony between vulnerable stages of an amphibian host (Pseudacris regilla) and infection by a pathogenic trematode (Ribeiroia ondatrae), determined infection prevalence, parasite load, and host...

Data from: Temporal scale-dependence of plant-pollinator networks

Benjamin Schwarz, Diego Vázquez, Paul CaraDonna, Tiffany Knight, Gita Benadi, Carsten Dormann, Benoit Gauzens, Elena Motivans, Julian Resasco, Nico Blüthgen, Laura Burkle, Qiang Fang, Christopher Kaiser-Bunbury, Ruben Alarcón, Justin Bain, Natacha Chacoff, Shuang-Quan Huang, Gretchen LeBuhn, Molly MacLeod, Theodora Petanidou, Claus Rasmussen, Michael Simanonok, Amibeth Thompson, Daniel Cariveau, Michael Roswell … & Jochen Fründ
The study of mutualistic interaction networks has led to valuable insights into ecological and evolutionary processes. However, our understanding of network structure may depend upon the temporal scale at which we sample and analyze network data. To date, we lack a comprehensive assessment of the temporal scale-dependence of network structure across a wide range of temporal scales and geographic locations. If network structure is temporally scale-dependent, networks constructed over different temporal scales may provide very...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    59

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    59

Affiliations

  • University of Colorado Boulder
    59
  • Northern Arizona University
    3
  • Wilfrid Laurier University
    2
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    2
  • University of Saskatchewan
    2
  • Oklahoma State University
    2
  • University of Nevada Reno
    2
  • Auckland University of Technology
    2
  • Montana State University
    2
  • Cornell University
    2