61 Works

Spontaneous quantity discrimination of artificial flowers by foraging honeybees

Scarlett Howard, Jürgen Schramme, Jair Garcia, Leslie Ng, Aurore Avarguès-Weber, Andrew Greentree & Adrian Dyer
Many animals need to process numerical information in order to survive. Spontaneous quantity discrimination is useful for assessing food resources, aggressive interactions, predator avoidance, and prey choice. Spontaneous quantity discrimination is a numerical ability allowing differentiation between two or more quantities without reinforcement nor prior training on any numerical task. Honeybees have previously demonstrated the ability to learn to count landmarks, match quantities, use numerical rules, discriminate between quantities, and perform arithmetic, but have not...

Data from: Evolutionary processes driving spatial patterns of intra-specific genetic diversity in river ecosystems

Ivan Paz-Viñas, Géraldine Loot, Virginie M. Stevens, Simon Blanchet & I. Paz-Vinas
Describing, understanding and predicting the spatial distribution of genetic diversity is a central issue in biological sciences. In river landscapes, it is generally predicted that neutral genetic diversity should increase downstream, but there have been few attempts to test and validate this assumption across taxonomic groups. Moreover, it is still unclear what are the evolutionary processes that may generate this apparent spatial pattern of diversity. Here, we quantitatively synthesized published results from diverse taxa living...

Data from: The mechanics of predator-prey interactions: first principles of physics predict predator-prey size ratios

Sebastien Portalier, Gregor Fussmann, Michel Loreau & Mehdi Cherif
1. Robust predictions of predator-prey interactions are fundamental for the understanding of food webs, their structure, dynamics, resistance to species loss, response to invasions and ecosystem function. Most current food web models measure parameters at the food web level to predict patterns at the same level. Thus, they are sensitive to the quality of the data, and may be ineffective in predicting non-observed interactions and disturbed food webs. There is a need for mechanistic models...

Data from: High-resolution forest mapping for behavioural studies in the nature reserve ‘Les Nouragues’, French Guiana

Max Ringler, Rosanna Mangione, Andrius Pašukonis, Gerhard Rainer, Kristin Gyimesi, Julia Felling-Wagner, Hannes Kronaus, Maxime Réjou-Méchain, Jérôme Chave, Karl Reiter & Eva Ringler
For animals with spatially complex behaviours at relatively small scales, the resolution of a global positioning system (GPS) receiver location is often below the resolution needed to correctly map animals’ spatial behaviour. Natural conditions such as canopy cover, canyons or clouds can further degrade GPS receiver reception. Here we present a detailed, high-resolution map of a 4.6 ha Neotropical river island and a 8.3 ha mainland plot with the location of every tree >5 cm...

Data from: ‘Becoming a species by becoming a pest’ or how two maize pests of the genus Ostrinia possibly evolved through parallel ecological speciation events

Denis Bourguet, Sergine Ponsard, Rejane Streiff, Serge Meusnier, Philippe Audiot, Jing Li & Zhen-Ying Wang
New agricultural pest species attacking introduced crops may evolve from pre-existing local herbivores by ecological speciation, thereby becoming a species by becoming a pest. We compare the evolutionary pathways by which two maize pests (the Asian and the European corn borers, ACB and ECB) in the genus Ostrinia (Lepidoptera, Crambidae) probably diverged from an ancestral species close to the current Adzuki bean borer (ABB). We typed larval Ostrinia populations collected on maize and dicotyledons across...

Data from: Threshold dynamics in plant succession after tree planting in agricultural riparian zones

Bérenger Bourgeois, Anne Vanasse, Eduardo González, Roxane Andersen & Monique Poulin
Trajectories of plant communities can be described by different models of plant succession. While a Clementsian (gradual continuum model) or Gleasonian approach (relay floristics model) has traditionally been used to inform restoration outcomes, alternative succession models developed recently may better represent restoration trajectories. The threshold dynamics succession model, which predicts an abrupt species turnover after an environmental threshold is crossed, has never been used in a restoration context. This model might, however, better describe shifts...

Data from: The role of selection and historical factors in driving population differentiation along an elevational gradient in an island bird

Joris A. M. Bertrand, Boris Delahaie, Yann X. C. Bourgeois, Thomas Duval, Ricardo García-Jiménez, Josselin Cornuault, Benoit Pujol, Christophe Thébaud & Borja Mila
Adaptation to local environmental conditions and the range dynamics of populations can influence evolutionary divergence along environmental gradients. Thus, it is important to investigate patterns of both phenotypic and genetic variation among populations to reveal the respective roles of these two types of factors in driving population differentiation. Here, we test for evidence of phenotypic and genetic structure across populations of a passerine bird (Zosterops borbonicus) distributed along a steep elevational gradient on the island...

Data from: A combinatorial analysis using observational data identifies species that govern ecosystem functioning

Benoît Jaillard, Philippe Deleporte, Michel Loreau & Cyrille Violle
Understanding the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning has so far resulted from two main approaches: the analysis of species' functional traits, and the analysis of species interaction networks. Here we propose a third approach, based on the association between combinations of species or of functional groups, which we term assembly motifs, and observed ecosystem functioning. Each assembly motif describes a biotic environment in which species interactions have particular effects on a given ecosystem function....

Data package from 'Pantropical variability in tree crown allometry' Global Ecology and Biogeography 2021. DOI: 10.1111/geb.13231

Grace Jopaul Loubota Panzou, Adeline Fayolle, Tommaso Jucker, Oliver Phillips, Stephanie Bohlman, Lindsay F. Banin, Simon L. Lewis, Kofi Affum-Baffoe, Luciana F. Alves, Cécile Antin, Eric Arets, Luzmila Arroyo, Timothy R. Baker, Nicolas Barbier, Hans Beeckman, Uta Berger, Yannick Enock Bocko, Frans Bongers, Sam Bowers, Thom Brade, Eduardo S. Brondizio, Arthur Chantrain, Jerome Chave, Halidou Compaore & David Coomes

A new, undescribed species of Melanocharis berrypecker from western New Guinea and the evolutionary history of the family Melanocharitidae

Borja Milá, Jade Bruxaux, Guillermo Friis, Katerina Sam, Hidayat Ashari & Christophe Thébaud
Western New Guinea remains one of the last biologically underexplored regions of the world, and much remains to be learned regarding the diversity and evolutionary history of its fauna and flora. During a recent ornithological expedition to the Kumawa Mountains in West Papua, we encountered an undescribed species of Melanocharis berrypecker (Melanocharitidae) in cloud forest at an elevation of 1200 m asl. Its main characteristics are iridescent blue-black upperparts, satin-white underparts washed lemon yellow, and...

Analysis of temporal patterns in animal movement networks

Cristian Pasquaretta, Thibault Dubois, Tamara Gomez-Moracho, Guillaume Le Loc’h, Virginie Perilhon Delepoulle, Philipp Heeb & Mathieu Lihoreau
1. Understanding how animal movements change across space and time is a fundamental question in ecology. While classical analyses of trajectories give insightful descriptors of spatial patterns, a satisfying method for assessing the temporal succession of such patterns is lacking. 2. Network analyses are increasingly used to capture properties of complex animal trajectories in simple graphical metrics. Here, building on this approach, we introduce a method that incorporates time into movement network analyses based on...

Data from: The demographic history of populations experiencing asymmetric gene flow: combining simulated and empirical data.

Ivan Paz Viñas, Erwan Quéméré, Lounès Chikhi, Géraldine Loot & Simon Blanchet
Population structure can significantly affect genetic-based demographic inferences, generating spurious bottleneck-like signals. Previous studies have typically assumed island or stepping-stone models, which are characterized by symmetric gene flow. However, many organisms are characterized by asymmetric gene flow. Here, we combined simulated and empirical data to test whether asymmetric gene flow affects the inference of past demographic changes. Through the analysis of simulated genetic data with three methods (i.e. bottleneck, M-ratio and msvar), we demonstrated that...

Data from: A novel locus on chromosome 1 underlies the evolution of a melanic plumage polymorphism in a wild songbird

Yann X.C. Bourgeois, Boris Delahaie, Mathieu Gautier, Emeline Lhuillier, Pierre-Jean G. Malé, Joris A.M. Bertrand, Josselin Cornuault, Kazumasa Wakamatsu, Olivier Bouchez, Claire Mould, Jade Bruxaux, Hélène Holota, Borja Mila, Christophe Thébaud, Joris A. M. Bertrand & Yann X. C. Bourgeois
Understanding the mechanisms responsible for phenotypic diversification within and among species ultimately rests with linking naturally occurring mutations to functionally and ecologically significant traits. Colour polymorphisms are of great interest in this context because discrete colour patterns within a population are often controlled by just a few genes in a common environment. We investigated how and why phenotypic diversity arose and persists in the Zosterops borbonicus white-eye of Reunion (Mascarene archipelago), a colour polymorphic songbird...

Data from: Offspring social network structure predicts fitness in families

Nick J. Royle, Thomas W. Pike, Phillip Heeb, Heinz Richner, Mathias Kölliker & M. Kolliker
Social structures such as families emerge as outcomes of behavioural interactions among individuals, and can evolve over time if families with particular types of social structures tend to leave more individuals in subsequent generations. The social behaviour of interacting individuals is typically analysed as a series of multiple dyadic (pair-wise) interactions, rather than a network of interactions among multiple individuals. However, in species where parents feed dependent young, interactions within families nearly always involve more...

Data from: Climate change and human colonization triggered habitat loss and fragmentation in Madagascar.

Jordi Salmona, Rasmus Heller, Erwan Quéméré & Lounès Chikhi
The relative effect of past climate fluctuations and anthropogenic activities on current biome distribution is subject to increasing attention, notably in biodiversity hot spots. In Madagascar, where humans arrived in the last ~4 to 5,000 years, the exact causes of the demise of large vertebrates that cohabited with humans are yet unclear. The prevailing narrative holds that Madagascar was covered with forest before human arrival and that the expansion of grasslands was the result of...

Data from: Melanin-based colouration and host-parasite interactions under global change

Jessica Côte, Amandine Boniface, Simon Blanchet, Andrew Hendry, Julien Gasparini & Lisa Jacquin
The role of parasites in shaping melanin-based colour polymorphism, and the consequences of colour polymorphism for disease resistance, remain debated. Here we review recent evidence of the links between melanin-based colouration and the behavioural and immunological defences of vertebrates against their parasites. First we propose that (1) differences between colour morphs can result in variable exposure to parasites, either directly (certain colours might be more or less attractive to parasites) or indirectly (variations in behaviour...

Data from: An a posteriori species clustering for quantifying the effects of species interactions on ecosystem functioning

Benoît Jaillard, Camille Richon, Philippe Deleporte, Michel Loreau & Cyrille Violle
1. Quantifying the effects of species interactions is key to understanding the relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning but remains elusive due to combinatorics issues. Functional groups have been commonly used to capture the diversity of forms and functions and thus simplify the reality. However, the explicit incorporation of species interactions is still lacking in functional group-based approaches. Here we propose a new approach based on an a posteriori clustering of species to quantify the...

Data from: Maternal exposure to predator scents: offspring phenotypic adjustment and dispersal

Elvire Bestion, Aimeric Teyssier, Fabien Aubret, Jean Clobert & Julien Cote
Predation is a strong selective pressure generating morphological, physiological and behavioural responses in organisms. As predation risk is often higher during juvenile stages, antipredator defences expressed early in life are paramount to survival. Maternal effects are an efficient pathway to produce such defences. We investigated whether maternal exposure to predator cues during gestation affected juvenile morphology, behaviour and dispersal in common lizards (Zootoca vivipara). We exposed 21 gravid females to saurophagous snake cues for one...

Data from: Extremely reduced dispersal and gene flow in an island bird

Joris A. M. Bertrand, Yann X. C. Bourgeois, Boris Delahaie, Thomas Duval, Ricardo García-Jiménez, Josselin Cornuault, Philipp Heeb, Borja Milá, Benoit Pujol & Christophe Thébaud
The Réunion grey white-eye, Zosterops borbonicus, a passerine bird endemic to Réunion Island in the Mascarene archipelago, represents an extreme case of microgeographical plumage colour variation in birds, with four distinct colour forms occupying different parts of this small island (2512 km2). To understand whether such population differentiation may reflect low levels of dispersal and gene flow at a very small spatial scale, we examined population structure and gene flow by analysing variation at 11...

Data from: Habituation in non-neural organisms: evidence from slime moulds

Romain P. Boisseau, David Vogel & Audrey Dussutour
Learning, defined as a change in behaviour evoked by experience, has hitherto been investigated almost exclusively in multicellular neural organisms. Evidence for learning in non-neural multicellular organisms is scant and only a few unequivocal reports of learning have been described in single celled organisms. Here we demonstrate habituation, an unmistakable form of learning, in the non-neural organism Physarum polycephalum. In our experiment, using chemotaxis as the behavioural output and quinine or caffeine as the stimulus,...

Data from: Uropygial gland size and composition varies according to experimentally modified microbiome in Great tits

Staffan Jacob, Anika Immer, Sarah Leclaire, Nathalie Parthuisot, Christine Ducamp, Gilles Espinasse & Philipp Heeb
Background: Parasites exert important selective pressures on host life history traits. In birds, feathers are inhabited by numerous microorganisms, some of them being able to degrade feathers or lead to infections. Preening feathers with secretions of the uropygial gland has been found to act as an antimicrobial defence mechanism, expected to regulate feather microbial communities and thus limit feather abrasion and infections. Here, we used an experimental approach to test whether Great tits (Parus major)...

Data from: The population biology of fungal invasions

Pierre Gladieux, Alice Feurtey, Michael E. Hood, Alodie Snirc, Joanne Clavel, Cyril Dutech, Melanie Roy & Tatiana Giraud
Fungal invasions are increasingly recognized as a significant component of global changes, threatening ecosystem health and damaging food production. Invasive fungi also provide excellent models to evaluate the generality of results based on other eukaryotes. We first consider here the reasons why fungal invasions have long been overlooked: they tend to be inconspicuous, and inappropriate methods have been used for species recognition. We then review the information available on the patterns and mechanisms of fungal...

Data from: The functional syndrome: linking individual trait variability to ecosystem functioning

Allan Raffard, Antoine Lecerf, Julien Cote, Mathieu Buoro, Remy Lassus & Julien Cucherousset
Phenotypic variability is increasingly assessed through functional response and effect traits, which provide a mechanistic framework for investigating how an organism responds to varying ecological factors and how these responses affect ecosystem functioning. Covariation between response and effect traits has been poorly examined at the intraspecific level, thus hampering progress in understanding how phenotypic variability alters the role of organisms in ecosystems. Using a multi-trait approach and a nine-month longitudinal monitoring of individual red-swamp crayfish...

Data from: Predictable food supplies induce plastic shifts in avian scaled body mass

Noraine Salleh Hudin, Diederik Strubbe, Aimeric Teyssier, Liesbeth De Neve, Joël White, Geert P. J. Janssens & Luc Lens
Urbanization constitutes one of the most profound forms of land-use change and strongly affects global biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Expansion of urban areas typically leads to species loss but may also induce more subtle changes in species dynamics through selection or plasticity. Using a dual correlative (field) and experimental (aviary) approach, we here show that free-ranging urban house sparrows in southern France were smaller and lighter than their rural counterparts after allometric scaling, whereas 2...

Data from: Local adaptation drives thermal tolerance among parasite populations: a common garden experiment

Elise Mazé-Guilmo, Simon Blanchet, Olivier Rey, Nicolas Canto & Géraldine Loot
Understanding the evolutionary responses of organisms to thermal regimes is of prime importance to better predict their ability to cope with ongoing climate change. Although this question has attracted interest in free-living organisms, whether or not infectious diseases have evolved heterogeneous responses to climate is still an open question. Here, we ran a common garden experiment using the fish ectoparasite Tracheliastes polycolpus, (i) to test whether parasites living in thermally heterogeneous rivers respond differently to...

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