137 Works

Data from: Low-quality birds do not display high-quality signals: the cysteine-pheomelanin mechanism of honesty

Ismael Galván, Kazumasa Wakamatsu, Pablo R. Camarero, Rafael Mateo & Carlos Alonso-Alvarez
The mechanisms that make that the costs of producing high-quality signals are unaffordable to low-quality signalers are a current issue in animal communication. The size of the melanin-based bib of male house sparrows Passer domesticus honestly signals quality. We induced the development of new bibs while treating males with buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO), a substance that depletes the levels of the antioxidant glutathione and the amino acid cysteine, two elements that switch melanogenesis from eumelanin to pheomelanin....

Data from: Maternal programming of offspring antipredator behavior in a seabird

Judith Morales, Alberto Lucas & Alberto Velando
Predation risk is an important environmental factor for animal populations, expected to trigger maternal effects to prepare offspring for living in an environment with predators. Yet, evidence of adaptive anticipatory maternal effects in wild animals is still weak. Here, we explored this question in a wild colony of yellow-legged gulls, Larus michahellis. To this aim, prior to laying we exposed mothers to either mink decoys or non-predator rabbit decoys and explored the antipredator behavior of...

Data from: Congruent phylogenetic and fossil signatures of mammalian diversification dynamics driven by tertiary abiotic change

Juan López Cantalapiedra, Manuel Hernández Fernández, Beatriz Azanza & Jorge Morales
Computational methods for estimating diversification rates from extant species phylogenetic trees have become abundant in evolutionary research. However, little evidence exists about how their outcome compares to a complementary and direct source of information: the fossil record. Furthermore, there is virtually no direct test for the congruence of evolutionary rates based on these two sources. This task is only achievable in clades with both a well-known fossil record and a complete phylogenetic tree. Here, we...

Data from: Hybridization during altitudinal range shifts: nuclear introgression leads to extensive cyto-nuclear discordance in the fire salamander

Ricardo Pereira, Iñigo Martínez-Solano, David Buckley & Ricardo J. Pereira
Ecological models predict that, in the face of climate change, taxa occupying steep altitudinal gradients will shift their distributions, leading to the contraction or extinction of the high-elevation (cold-adapted) taxa. However, hybridization between eco-morphologically divergent taxa commonly occurs in nature and may lead to alternative evolutionary outcomes, such as genetic merger or gene flow at specific genes. We evaluate this hypothesis by studying patterns of divergence and gene flow across three replicate contact zones between...

Data from: The oxidative cost of reproduction depends on early development oxidative stress and sex in a bird species

Ana Angela Romero Haro, Gabriele Sorci, Carlos Alonso-Alvarez & A. A. Romero-Haro
In the early 2000’s, a new component of the cost of reproduction was proposed: oxidative stress. Since then the oxidative cost of reproduction hypothesis has, however, received mixed support. Different arguments have been provided to explain this. Among them, the lack of a life history perspective on most experimental tests was suggested. We manipulated the levels of a key intracellular antioxidant (glutathione) in captive zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) during a short period of early life...

Data from: Interspecific transfer of parasites following a range-shift in Ficedula flycatchers

William Jones, Katarzyna Kulma, Staffan Bensch, Mariusz Cichoń, Anvar Kerimov, Miloš Krist, Toni Laaksonen, Juan Moreno, Pavel Munclinger, Fred Slater, Eszter Szöllősi, Marcel E. Visser, Anna Qvarnström & Fred M. Slater
Human-induced climate change is expected to cause major biotic changes in species distributions and thereby including escalation of novel host-parasite associations. Closely related host species that come into secondary contact are especially likely to exchange parasites and pathogens. Two competing theories, the Enemy Release Hypothesis, where invading hosts escape their original parasites; and the Novel Weapon Hypothesis, where invading hosts bring new parasites that have detrimental effects on native hosts, have been described to predict...

Data from: Phylogeographic analysis reveals northerly refugia for the riverine amphibian Triturus dobrogicus (Caudata: Salamandridae)

Judit Vörös, Peter Mikulíček, Ágnes Major, Ernesto Recuero & Jan W. Arntzen
We investigated the recent evolutionary history of the Danube crested newt, Triturus dobrogicus through reconstructions of: (1) the number and position of refugia at the last glacial maximum, (2) the role of major central European rivers in pattern of post-glacial dispersal, and (3) the present-day distribution pattern. We analysed sequences of mitochondrial DNA (ND2, 1065 bp) and six microsatellite loci in 363 T. dobrogicus individuals from 58 populations covering the range of the species. Our...

Data from: Coloration of chicks modulates costly interactions among family members

Judith Morales & Alberto Velando
The resolution of family conflicts over parental care involves elaborate behavioral interactions where signals and information exchange play a central role. Usually the focus is on offspring begging and adult signals and their effect on parental provisioning. Yet, despite offspring of many animal species display structural ornaments during parental dependency, their role in intra-family conflicts remains practically unexplored. In the blue tit, Cyanistes caeruleus, we experimentally manipulated nestling plumage color and food availability in 60...

Data from: Systematics of spiny-backed treefrogs (Hylidae: Osteocephalus): an Amazonian puzzle

Karl-Heinz Jungfer, Julián Faivovich, José M. Padial, Santiago Castroviejo-Fisher, Mariana M. Lyra, Bianca Von Muller Berneck, Patricia P. Iglesias, Philippe J. R. Kok, Ross T. Macculloch, Miguel Trefaut Rodrigues, Vanessa K. Verdade, Claudia P. Torres Gastello, Juan Carlos Chaparro, Paula H. Valdujo, Steffen Reichle, Jiří Moravec, Václav Gvoždík, Giussepe Gagliardi-Urrutia, Raffael Ernst, Ignacio De La Riva, Donald Bruce Means, Albertina P. Lima, J. Celsa Señaris, Ward C. Wheeler & Célio F. B. Haddad
Spiny-backed tree frogs of the genus Osteocephalus are conspicuous components of the tropical wet forests of the Amazon and the Guiana Shield. Here, we revise the phylogenetic relationships of Osteocephalus and its sister group Tepuihyla, using up to 6134 bp of DNA sequences of nine mitochondrial and one nuclear gene for 338 specimens from eight countries and 218 localities, representing 89% of the 28 currently recognized nominal species. Our phylogenetic analyses reveal (i) the paraphyly...

Data from: Conserving evolutionary history does not result in greater diversity over geological timescales

Juan Cantalapiedra, Tracy Aze, Marc Cadotte, Giulio Valentino Dalla Riva, Danwei Huang, Florent Mazel, Matthew Pennell, María Ríos & Arne Mooers
Alternative prioritization strategies have been proposed to safeguard biodiversity over macro-evolutionary timescales. The first prioritizes the most distantly related species (maximizing phylogenetic diversity) in the hopes of capturing at least some lineages that will successfully diversify into the future. The second prioritizes lineages that are currently speciating, in the hopes that successful lineages will continue to generate species into the future. These contrasting schemes also map onto contrasting predictions about the role of slow diversifiers...

Data from: Diversification of mammals from the Miocene of Spain

M. Soledad Domingo, Catherine Badgley, Beatriz Azanza, Daniel DeMiguel & M. Teresa Alberdi
The mammalian fossil record of Spain is long and taxonomically well resolved, offering the most complete record of faunal change for the Neogene of Europe. We evaluated changes in diversification, composition, trophic structure, and size structure of large mammals over the middle and late Miocene with methods applied to this record for the first time, including ordination of fossil localities to improve temporal resolution and estimation of confidence intervals on taxa temporal ranges. By contrast,...

Data from: Canopy height explains species richness in the largest clade of Neotropical lianas

Leila Meyer, José Alexandre F. Diniz-Filho, Lúcia G. Lohmann, Joaquín Hortal, Elisa Barreto, Thiago Rangel & W. Daniel Kissling
Aim: Tall and structurally complex forests can provide ample habitat and niche space for climbing plants, supporting high liana species richness. We test to what extent canopy height (as proxy of 3D habitat structure), climate and soil interact to determine species richness in the largest clade of Neotropical lianas. We expect that the effect of canopy height on species richness is higher for lianas from closed tropical rainforests compared to riparian and savanna habitats. Location:...

Data from: Fin ray patterns at the fin to limb transition

Thomas Stewart, Justin Lemberhg, Natalia Taft, Ihna Yoo, Edward Daeschler & Neil Shubin
The fin-to-limb transition was marked by the origin of digits and the loss of dermal fin rays. Paleontological research into this transformation has focused on the evolution of the endoskeleton with little attention paid to fin ray structure and function. To address this knowledge gap, we study the dermal rays of the pectoral fins of three key tetrapodomorph taxa—Sauripterus taylori (Rhizodontida), Eusthenopteron foordi (Tristichopteridae), and Tiktaalik roseae (Elpistostegalia)—using computed tomography. These data show several trends...

Dietary Vitamin D in female rock lizards induces condition-transfer effects in their offspring

Gonzalo Rodríguez-Ruiz, Pilar López & José Martín
One way that maternal effects may benefit the offspring is by informing them about the characteristics of the environment. Through gestation, environmentally induced maternal effects might promote in the offspring specific behavioral responses like dispersal or residence, according to their new habitat characteristics. Females of the Carpetan rock lizard (Iberolacerta cyreni) seem to choose their home ranges using the smell of provitamin D3 in scent marks produced by males. Here, we supplemented gravid females of...

Data from: Deconstructing species richness–environment relationships in Neotropical lianas

Leila Meyer, W. Daniel Kissling, Lucia G. Lohmann, Joaquín Hortal & José A. F. Diniz-Filho
Abstract Aim: Studying species richness patterns by considering all species as equivalent units may prevent a deeper understanding of the origin and maintenance of biodiversity. Here, we deconstructed the species richness of Neotropical lianas by specific attributes of species to study richness–environment relationships. Location: Neotropics Taxon: Tribe Bignonieae (Bignoniaceae), the largest clade of Neotropical lianas Methods: We used five morphological, one geographical and two evolutionary attributes of species, each with 2–7 attribute states. We compared...

Quantitative genetics of extreme insular dwarfing: the case of red deer (Cervus elaphus) on Jersey

José Alexandre Felizola Diniz-Filho, Ana Santos, Elisa Barreto, Felipe Naves, Wanderson Santos, Kelly Souza, Rejane Santos-Silva, Ricardo Dobrovolski, Thannya Soares, Rosana Tidon, Zander Spigoloni, Thiago Rangel, Pasquale Raia, Joaquín Hortal & Lucas Jardim
Aim: The Island Rule – i.e. the tendency for body size to decrease in large mammals and increase in small mammals on islands has been commonly evaluated through macroecological or macroevolutionary, pattern-orientated approaches, which generally fail to model the microevolutionary processes driving either dwarfing or gigantism. Here, we seek to identify which microevolutionary process could have driven extreme insular dwarfism in the extinct dwarf red deer population on the island of Jersey. Location: Jersey, UK...

Comparative transcriptomics of the venoms of continental and insular radiations of West African cones

Samuel Abalde, Manuel J. Tenorio, Carlos M. L. Afonso & Rafael Zardoya
The transcriptomes of the venom glands of 13 closely related species of vermivorous cones endemic to West Africa from genera Africonus and Varioconus were sequenced and venom repertoires compared within a phylogenetic framework. The total number of conotoxin precursors per species varied between 108 and 221. Individuals of the same species shared about one fourth of the total conotoxin precursors. The number of common sequences was drastically reduced in the pairwise comparisons between closely related...

Rapid radiation and rampant reticulation: Phylogenomics of South American Liolaemus lizards

Damien Esquerre, Scott Keogh, Diego Demangel, Mariana Morando, Luciano Avila, Francisco Ferri-Yáñez & Adam Leaché
Understanding the factors that cause heterogeneity among gene trees can increase the accuracy of species trees. Discordant signals across the genome are commonly produced by incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) and introgression, which in turn can result in reticulate evolution. Species tree inference using the multispecies coalescent is designed to deal with ILS and is robust to low levels of introgression, but extensive introgression violates the fundamental assumption that relationships are strictly bifurcating. In this study,...

A new, undescribed species of Melanocharis berrypecker from western New Guinea and the evolutionary history of the family Melanocharitidae

Borja Milá, Jade Bruxaux, Guillermo Friis, Katerina Sam, Hidayat Ashari & Christophe Thébaud
Western New Guinea remains one of the last biologically underexplored regions of the world, and much remains to be learned regarding the diversity and evolutionary history of its fauna and flora. During a recent ornithological expedition to the Kumawa Mountains in West Papua, we encountered an undescribed species of Melanocharis berrypecker (Melanocharitidae) in cloud forest at an elevation of 1200 m asl. Its main characteristics are iridescent blue-black upperparts, satin-white underparts washed lemon yellow, and...

Maternal diet affects juvenile Carpetan rock lizard performance and personality

Gergely Horváth, Gonzalo Rodríguez-Ruiz, José Martín, Pilar López & Gábor Herczeg
Differences in both stable and labile state variables are known to affect the emergence and maintenance of consistent inter-individual behavioural variation (animal personality or behavioural syndrome), especially when experienced early in life. Variation in environmental conditions experienced by gestating mothers (viz. non-genetic maternal effects) are known to have significant impact on offspring condition and behaviour, yet, their effect on behavioural consistency is not clear. Here, by applying an orthogonal experimental design, we aimed to study...

Within-island diversification in a passerine bird

Maëva Gabrielli, Benoit Nabholz, Thibault Leroy, Borja Milá & Christophe Thébaud
The presence of congeneric taxa on the same island suggests the possibility of in situ divergence, but can also result from multiple colonizations of previously diverged lineages. Here, using genome-wide data from a large population sample, we test the hypothesis that intra-island divergence explains the occurrence of four geographic forms meeting at hybrid zones in the Reunion grey white-eye (Zosterops borbonicus), a species complex endemic to the small volcanic island of Reunion. Using population genomic...

Butterfly phenology in Mediterranean mountains using space-for-time substitution

Konstantina Zografou, Andrea Grill, Robert Wilson, John Halley, George Adamidis & Vassiliki Kati
Inferring species' responses to climate change in the absence of long-term time series data is a challenge, but can be achieved by substituting space for time. For example, thermal elevational gradients represent suitable proxies to study phenological responses to warming. We used butterfly data from two Mediterranean mountain areas to test whether mean dates of appearance of communities and individual species show a delay with increasing altitude, and an accompanying shortening in the duration of...

Pervasive admixture and the spread of a large-lipped form in a cichlid fish radiation

Will Sowersby, José Cerca, Bob Wong, Topi Lehtonen, David Chapple, Mariana Leal-Cardin, Marta Barluenga & Mark Ravinet
Adaptive radiations have proven important for understanding the mechanisms and processes underlying biological diversity. The convergence of form and function, as well as admixture and adaptive introgression, are common in adaptive radiations. However, distinguishing between these two scenarios remains a challenge for evolutionary research. The Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus spp.) is a prime example of adaptive radiation, with phenotypic diversification occurring at various stages of genetic differentiation. One species, A. labiatus, has large fleshy...

Data from: Fine-tuning biodiversity assessments: A framework to pair eDNA metabarcoding and morphological approaches

Cátia Lúcio Pereira, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, Miguel Bastos Araújo & Miguel Graça Matias
Accurate quantification of biodiversity can be demanding and expensive. Although environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding can facilitate biodiversity assessments through non-invasive, cost-efficient, and rapid surveys, the approach struggles to outperform traditional morphological approaches in providing reliable quantitative estimates for surveyed species (e.g., abundance and biomass). We present an integrated methodology for improving biodiversity surveys that pairs eDNA metabarcoding with morphological data, following a series of taxonomic and geographic filters. We demonstrate its power by applying it...

Dispersal syndromes are poorly associated with climatic niche differences in the Azorean seed plants

María Leo, Manuel J. Steinbauer, Paulo A. V. Borges, Eduardo B. De Azevedo, Rosalina Gabriel, Hanno Schaefer & Ana M. C. Santos
Aim: Environmental niche tracking is linked to the species ability to disperse. While well investigated on large spatial scales, dispersal constraints also influence small-scale processes and may explain the difference between the potential and the realized niche of species at small-scales. Here we test whether niche size and niche fill differ systematically according to dispersal syndrome within isolated oceanic islands. We expect species with higher dispersal abilities (anemochorous or endozoochorous) will have a higher niche...

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