90 Works

Data from: Biogeography of scorpions in the Pseudouroctonus minimus complex (Vaejovidae) from south-western North America: implications of ecological specialization for pre-Quaternary diversification

Robert W. Bryson, Warren E. Savary & Lorenzo Prendini
Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of pre-Quaternary tectonics and orogeny relative to that of Pleistocene climate change on diversification within the Pseudouroctonus minimus complex, a group of vaejovid scorpions with stenotopic habitat requirements. Location: South-western North America (United States and Mexico). Methods: Multilocus sequence data (1899 base pairs from two mitochondrial and two nuclear genes) were generated from 65 samples of scorpions in the minimus complex. Phylogeographical structure within...

Data from: A unified anatomy ontology of the vertebrate skeletal system

Wasila M. Dahdul, James P. Balhoff, David C. Blackburn, Alexander D. Diehl, Melissa A. Haendel, Brian K. Hall, Hilmar Lapp, John G. Lundberg, Christopher J. Mungall, Martin Ringwald, Erik Segerdell, Ceri E. Van Slyke, Matthew K. Vickaryous, Monte Westerfield & Paula M. Mabee
The skeleton is of fundamental importance in research in comparative vertebrate morphology, paleontology, biomechanics, developmental biology, and systematics. Motivated by research questions that require computational access to and comparative reasoning across the diverse skeletal phenotypes of vertebrates, we developed a module of anatomical concepts for the skeletal system, the Vertebrate Skeletal Anatomy Ontology (VSAO), to accommodate and unify the existing skeletal terminologies for the species-specific (mouse, the frog Xenopus, zebrafish) and multispecies (teleost, amphibian) vertebrate...

Data from: Multi-locus sequence data reveal a new species of coral reef goby (Teleostei: Gobiidae: Eviota), and evidence of Pliocene vicariance across the Coral Triangle

Luke Tornabene, Samantha Valdez, Mark V. Erdmann & Frank L. Pezold
Here, multi-locus sequence data are coupled with observations of live colouration to recognize a new species, Eviota punyit from the Coral Triangle, Indian Ocean and Red Sea. Relaxed molecular clock divergence time estimation indicates a Pliocene origin for the new species, and the current distribution of the new species and its sister species Eviota sebreei supports a scenario of vicariance across the Indo-Pacific Barrier, followed by subsequent range expansion and overlap in the Coral Triangle....

Data from: Genomic data reveal ancient microendemism in forest scorpions across the California Floristic Province

, Warren E. Savary, Amanda J. Zellmer, R. Bruce Bury, John E. McCormack & Robert W. Bryson
The California Floristic Province (CFP) in western North America is a globally significant biodiversity hotspot. Elucidating patterns of endemism and the historical drivers of this diversity has been an important challenge of comparative phylogeography for over two decades. We generated phylogenomic data using ddRADseq to examine genetic structure in Uroctonus forest scorpions, an ecologically restricted and dispersal-limited organism widely distributed across the CFP north to the Columbia River. We coupled our genetic data with species...

Data from: Ecological continuity and transformation after the Permo-Triassic mass extinction in northeastern Panthalassa

Ashley A. Dineen, Peter D. Roopnarine & Margaret L. Fraiser
The Permo-Triassic mass extinction (PTME) is often implicated in the transition from the Paleozoic Evolutionary Fauna (PEF) to the Modern Evolutionary Fauna (MEF). However the exact timing and details of this progression are unknown, especially regarding the vacating and filling of functional ecological space after the PTME. Here we quantify the functional diversity of middle Permian and Early Triassic marine paleocommunities in the western US to determine functional re-organization in the aftermath of the PTME....

Data from: Taxonomic revision of the Malagasy Camponotus subgenus Mayria (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) using qualitative and quantitative morphology

Jean Claude Rakotonirina & Brian L. Fisher
The Camponotus subgenus Mayria is revised based on the analysis of both qualitative morphological characters and morphometric traits. The multivariate analysis combined the Nest Centroid (NC)-clustering method and Partitioning Algorithm based on Recursive Thresholding (PART) function to generate species hypotheses based on 19 continuous morphological traits of minor workers. The proposed species hypotheses were confirmed by cumulative Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA). Morphometric ratios for the subsets of minor and major workers were used in species...

Data from: A stable phylogenomic classification of Travunioidea (Arachnida, Opiliones, Laniatores) based on sequence capture of ultraconserved elements

Shahan Derkarabetian, James Starrett, Nobuo Tsurusaki, Darrell Ubick, Stephanie Castillo & Marshal Hedin
Molecular phylogenetics has transitioned into the phylogenomic era, with data derived from next-generation sequencing technologies allowing unprecedented phylogenetic resolution in all animal groups, including understudied invertebrate taxa. Within the most diverse harvestmen suborder, Laniatores, most relationships at all taxonomic levels have yet to be explored from a phylogenomics perspective. Travunioidea is an early-diverging lineage of laniatorean harvestmen with a Laurasian distribution, with species distributed in eastern Asia, eastern and western North America, and south-central Europe....

The Life Aquatic with Spiders (Araneae): Repeated Evolution of Aquatic Habitat Association in Dictynidae and Allied Taxa

Sarah Crews, Erika Garcia, Joe Spagna, Matthew Van Dam & Lauren Esposito
Despite the terrestriality of spiders, species across a diverse array of families are associated with aquatic habitats. Many species in the spider family Dictynidae are associated with water, either living near it, or in the case of Argyroneta aquatica (Clerck, 1757), in it. Previous studies have indicated that this association arose once within the family. Here we test the hypothesis of a single origin via the broadest phylogeny of dictynids and related “marronoids” to date...

Data from: 200 million years of anuran body size evolution in relation to geography, ecology, and life history

Molly Womack & Rayna Bell
Surprisingly little is known about body-size evolution within the most diverse amphibian order, anurans (frogs and toads), despite known effects of body size on the physiological, ecological, and life-history traits of animals more generally. Here we examined anuran body-size evolution among 2434 species with over 200 million years of shared evolutionary history. We found clade-specific evolutionary shifts to new body-size optima along with numerous independent transitions to gigantic and miniature body sizes, despite the upper...

Spatial phylogenomics of acrobat ants in Madagascar—mountains function as cradles for recent diversity and endemism

Gabriela P. Camacho, Ana Carolina Loss, Brian L. Fisher & Bonnie B. Blaimer
Aim: A crucial step to protecting biodiversity is assessing species diversity and endemism. We delineate spatial patterns of diversity in Malagasy ants on a phylogenetic and taxonomic level to identify centers of diversity and endemism, and evaluate the ‘museum vs cradle’ hypothesis with regard to ant endemism. Location: Madagascar Taxon: Ants, genus Crematogaster. Methods: We estimated distribution models for 33 Crematogaster species and generated a phylogeny based on ultraconserved elements. We calculated species richness (SR),...

Data from: Ecological and environmental stability in offshore Southern California Marine Basins through the Holocene

Hannah Palmer, Tessa Hill, Esther Kennedy, Peter Roopnarine, Sonali Langlois, Katherine Reyes & Lowell Stott
In the face of ongoing marine deoxygenation, understanding timescales and drivers of past oxygenation change is of critical importance. Marine sediment cores from tiered silled basins provide a natural laboratory to constrain timing and implications of oxygenation changes across multiple depths. Here, we reconstruct oxygenation and environmental change over time using benthic foraminiferal assemblages from sediment cores from three basins across the Southern California Borderlands: Tanner Basin (EW9504-09PC, 1194 m water depth), San Nicolas Basin...

Data from: Phylogenomic analyses of echinoid diversification prompt a re-evaluation of their fossil record

Nicolás Mongiardino Koch, Jeffrey R Thompson, Avery S Hatch, Marina F McCowin, A Frances Armstrong, Simon E Coppard, Felipe Aguilera, Omri Bronstein, Andreas Kroh, Rich Mooi & Greg W Rouse
Echinoids are key components of modern marine ecosystems. Despite a remarkable fossil record, the emergence of their crown group is documented by few specimens of unclear affinities, rendering their early history uncertain. The origin of sand dollars, one of its most distinctive clades, is also unclear due to an unstable phylogenetic context. We employ eighteen novel genomes and transcriptomes to build a phylogenomic dataset with a near-complete sampling of major lineages. With it, we revise...

Recent dispersal and diversification within the clingfish genus Acyrtus (Actinopterygii: Gobiesocidae), with the description of a new western Atlantic species

Thais L. Quintão, João Luiz Gasparini, Jean-Christophe Joyeux, Luiz A. Rocha & Hudson T. Pinheiro
Abstract The genus Acyrtus (Gobiesocidae) is represented by four valid species distributed in the western Atlantic, and a recently described fifth species from the eastern Pacific. Here, we describe a new species endemic to Trindade Island, Brazil, and provide the first phylogenetic inference for the genus including all representatives. The new species can be distinguished from all its congeners by meristic and morphometric characters, as well as genetic differences. It presents low genetic diversity and,...

Data from: Plant diversity and endemism in the California Floristic Province

Dylan O. Burge, James H. Thorne, Susan P. Harrison, Bart C. O'Brien, Jon P. Rebman, James R. Shevock, Edward R. Alverson, Linda K. Hardison, José Delgadillo-Rodríguez, Steven A. Junak, Thomas A. Oberbauer, Hugo Riemann, Sula E. Vanderplank & Teri Barry
The California Floristic Province (CFP) is an area of high biodiversity and endemism corresponding roughly to the portion of western North America having a Mediterranean-type climate. High levels of diversity and endemism in the CFP are attributed to the unique geo-climatic setting of the region. In recent years, much has been learned about the origins of plant diversity in western North America. This work, however, has been hindered by a focus on political rather than...

Data from: Genomic signatures of geographic isolation and natural selection in coral reef fishes

Michelle R. Gaither, Moisés A. Bernal, Richard R. Coleman, Brian W. Bowen, Shelley A. Jones, Warren Brian Simison & Luiz A. Rocha
The drivers of speciation remain among the most controversial topics in evolutionary biology. Initially, Darwin emphasized natural selection as a primary mechanism of speciation, but the architects of the modern synthesis largely abandoned that view in favour of divergence by geographic isolation. The balance between selection and isolation is still at the forefront of the evolutionary debate, especially for the world's tropical oceans where biodiversity is high, but isolating barriers are few. Here, we identify...

Data from: Reed frog diversification in the Gulf of Guinea: overseas dispersal, the progression rule, and in situ speciation

Rayna C. Bell, Robert C. Drewes & Kelly R. Zamudio
Oceanic islands accumulate endemic species when new colonists diverge from source populations or by in situ diversification of resident island endemics. The relative importance of dispersal versus in situ speciation in generating diversity on islands varies with a number of archipelago characteristics including island size, age, and remoteness. Here we characterize inter-island dispersal and in situ speciation in frogs endemic to the Gulf of Guinea islands. Using mitochondrial sequence and genome-wide SNP data we demonstrate...

Data from: Phylogenomics resolves the timing and pattern of insect evolution

Bernhard Misof, Shanlin Liu, Karen Meusemann, Ralph S. Peters, Alexander Donath, Christoph Mayer, Paul B. Frandsen, Jessica Ware, Tomas Flouri, Rolf G. Beutel, Oliver Niehuis, Malte Petersen, Fernando Izquierdo-Carrasco, Torsten Wappler, Jes Rust, Andre J. Aberer, Ulrike Aspöck, Horst Aspöck, Daniela Bartel, Alexander Blanke, Simon Berger, Alexander Böhm, Thomas Buckley, Brett Calcott, Junqing Chen … & Xin Zhou
Insects are the most speciose group of animals, but the phylogenetic relationships of many major lineages remain unresolved. We inferred the phylogeny of insects from 1478 protein-coding genes. Phylogenomic analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequences, with site-specific nucleotide or domain-specific amino acid substitution models, produced statistically robust and congruent results resolving previously controversial phylogenetic relations hips. We dated the origin of insects to the Early Ordovician [~479 million years ago (Ma)], of insect flight...

Data from: A passerine bird's evolution corroborates the geologic history of the island of New Guinea

Kristy Deiner, Alan R. Lemmon, Andrew L. Mack, Robert C. Fleischer & John P. Dumbacher
New Guinea is a biologically diverse island, with a unique geologic history and topography that has likely played a role in the evolution of species. Few island-wide studies, however, have examined the phylogeographic history of lowland species. The objective of this study was to examine patterns of phylogeographic variation of a common and widespread New Guinean bird species (Colluricincla megarhyncha). Specifically, we test the mechanisms hypothesized to cause geographic and genetic variation (e.g., vicariance, isolation...

Data from: Taxonomic revision of imitating carpenter ants, Camponotus subgenus Myrmopytia (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) of Madagascar, using morphometry and qualitative traits

Nicole Rasoamanana, Sándor Csősz & Brian L. Fisher
The ant genus Camponotus (Mayr, 1861) is one of the most abundant and species rich ant genera in the Malagasy zoogeographical region. Although this group is commonly encountered, its taxonomy is far from complete. Here, we clarify the taxonomy of the Malagasy-endemic Camponotus subgenus Myrmopytia (Emery, 1920). Species delimitation was based on traditional morphological characters and multivariate morphometric analyses, including exploratory Nest Centroid clustering and confirmatory cross-validated Linear Discriminant Analysis. Four species are recognized: Camponotus...

Data from: Adaptation to reef habitats through selection on the coral animal and its associated microbiome

Madeleine J.H. Van Oppen, Pim Bongaerts, Pedro Frade, Lesa M. Peplow, Sarah E. Boyd, Hieu T. Nim, Line K. Bay & Madeleine J. H. Van Oppen
Spatially adjacent habitats on coral reefs can represent highly distinct environments, often harbouring different coral communities. Yet, certain coral species thrive across divergent environments. It is unknown whether the forces of selection are sufficiently strong to overcome the counteracting effects of the typically high gene flow over short distances, and for local adaptation to occur. We screened the coral genome (using restriction-site-associated sequencing [RAD-seq]), and characterized both the dinoflagellate photosymbiont and tissue-associated prokaryote microbiomes (using...

Data from: Introgression and selection shaped the evolutionary history of sympatric sister-species of coral reef fishes (genus: Haemulon)

Moises A. Bernal, Michelle R. Gaither, Warren Brian Simison & Luiz A. Rocha
Closely related marine species with large sympatric ranges provide opportunities to study the mechanisms of speciation, particularly when there is evidence of gene flow between the lineages. Here we focus on a case of hybridization between the sympatric sister-species Haemulon maculicauda and H. flaviguttatum, using Sanger sequencing of mitochondrial and nuclear loci, as well as 2422 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) obtained via Restriction-site Associated DNA Sequencing (RADSeq). Mitochondrial markers revealed a shared haplotype for COI...

Data from: High species richness and lineage diversity of reef corals in the mesophotic zone

Paul R. Muir, Carden C. Wallace, Michel Pichon & Pim Bongaerts
Coral reefs are increasingly threatened by thermal bleaching and tropical storm events associated with rising sea surface temperatures. Deeper habitats offer some protection from these impacts and may safeguard reef-coral biodiversity, but their faunas are largely undescribed for the Indo-Pacific. Here, we show high species richness of scleractinian corals in mesophotic habitats (30-125 m) for the northern Great Barrier Reef region that greatly exceeds previous records for mesophotic habitats globally. Overall, 45% of shallow reef...

Do alignment and trimming methods matter for phylogenomic (UCE) analyses?

Daniel Portik & John Wiens
Alignment is a crucial issue in molecular phylogenetics because different alignment methods can potentially yield very different topologies for individual genes. But it is unclear if the choice of alignment methods remains important in phylogenomic analyses, which incorporate data from dozens, hundreds, or thousands of genes. For example, problematic biases in alignment might be multiplied across many loci, whereas alignment errors in individual genes might become irrelevant. The issue of alignment trimming (i.e. removing poorly...

Incipient speciation and secondary contact in a fossorial island endemic, the São Tomé caecilian

Kyle O'Connell, Ivan Prates, Lauren Scheinberg, Kevin Mulder & Rayna Bell
Secondary contact of lineages in the early stages of divergence can result in lineage fusion or promote reproductive isolation through reinforcement. While these processes are well studied in many taxonomic groups, we know little about their contribution to diversification of the secretive and enigmatic caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona). Here, we combine genetic (mtDNA and genome-wide SNPs) and phenotypic data to investigate the divergence history of caecilians endemic to the oceanic island of São Tomé in the...

Speciation and gene flow across an elevational gradient in New Guinea kingfishers

Ethan Linck, Benjamin Freeman & John Dumbacher
Closely related species with parapatric elevational ranges are ubiquitous in tropical mountains worldwide. The gradient speciation hypothesis proposes that these series are the result of in situ ecological speciation driven by divergent selection across elevation. Direct tests of this scenario have been hampered by the difficulty inferring the geographic arrangement of populations at the time of divergence. In cichlids, sticklebacks, and Timema stick insects, support for ecological speciation driven by other selective pressures has come...

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