13 Works

Amino acids (AA) all genes for: Beyond Drosophila: resolving the rapid radiation of schizophoran flies with phylotranscriptomics

Keith Bayless, Michelle Trautwein, Karen Meusemann, David Yeates & Brian Wiegmann
Background: The largest radiation of animal life since the end Cretaceous extinction event 66 million years ago is that of schizophoran flies: a third of fly diversity including Drosophila lab fruit flies, house flies, and many other well and poorly known true flies. Rapid diversification has hindered previous attempts to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships among major schizophoran clades. A robust phylogenetic hypothesis for the major lineages containing these 55,000 described species would be critical to...

Finding complexity in complexes: assessing the causes of mitonuclear discordance in a problematic species complex of Mesoamerican toads

Thomas Firneno, Justin O'Neill, Daniel Portik, Alyson Emery, Josiah Townsend & Matthew Fujita
Mitonuclear discordance is a frequently encountered pattern in phylogeographic studies and occurs when mitochondrial and nuclear DNA display conflicting signals. Discordance among these genetic markers can be caused by several factors including confounded taxonomies, gene flow, and incomplete lineage sorting. In this study, we present a strong case of mitonuclear discordance in a species complex of toads (Bufonidae: Incilius coccifer complex) found in the Chortís Block of Central America. To determine the cause of mitonuclear...

Genomic characterization and curation of UCEs improves species tree reconstruction: Supplementary Material S1

Matthew Van Dam
Ultraconserved genomic elements (UCEs) are generally treated as independent loci in phylogenetic analyses. The identification pipeline for UCE probes does not require prior knowledge of genetic identity, only selecting loci that are highly conserved, single copy, without repeats, and of a particular length. Here we characterized UCEs from 11 phylogenomic studies across the animal tree of life, from birds to marine invertebrates. We found that within vertebrate lineages, UCEs are mostly intronic and intergenic, while...

Population genomic response to geographic gradients by widespread and endemic fishes of the Arabian Peninsula

Joseph DiBattista, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Marek Piatek, Fernando Cagua, Brian Bowen, John Choat, Luiz Rocha, Michelle Gaither, Jean-Paul Hobbs, Tane Sinclair-Taylor, Jennifer McIlwain, Mark Priest, Camrin Braun, Nigel Hussey, Steven Kessel & Michael Berumen
Genetic structure within marine species may be driven by local adaptation to their environment, or alternatively by historical processes, such as geographic isolation. The gulfs and seas bordering the Arabian Peninsula offer an ideal setting to examine connectivity patterns in coral reef fishes with respect to environmental gradients and vicariance. The Red Sea is characterized by a unique marine fauna, historical periods of desiccation and isolation, as well as environmental gradients in salinity, temperature, and...

Data from: 200 million years of anuran body size evolution in relation to geography, ecology, and life history

Molly Womack & Rayna Bell
Surprisingly little is known about body-size evolution within the most diverse amphibian order, anurans (frogs and toads), despite known effects of body size on the physiological, ecological, and life-history traits of animals more generally. Here we examined anuran body-size evolution among 2434 species with over 200 million years of shared evolutionary history. We found clade-specific evolutionary shifts to new body-size optima along with numerous independent transitions to gigantic and miniature body sizes, despite the upper...

Incipient speciation and secondary contact in a fossorial island endemic, the São Tomé caecilian

Kyle O'Connell, Ivan Prates, Lauren Scheinberg, Kevin Mulder & Rayna Bell
Secondary contact of lineages in the early stages of divergence can result in lineage fusion or promote reproductive isolation through reinforcement. While these processes are well studied in many taxonomic groups, we know little about their contribution to diversification of the secretive and enigmatic caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona). Here, we combine genetic (mtDNA and genome-wide SNPs) and phenotypic data to investigate the divergence history of caecilians endemic to the oceanic island of São Tomé in the...

Data from: Patterns of genomic divergence and signals of selection in sympatric and allopatric northeastern Pacific and Sea of Cortez populations of the sargo (Anisotremus davidsonii) and longjaw mudsucker (Gillichthys mirabilis)

Eric Garcia, Brian Simison & Giacomo Bernardi
Studying how isolation can impact population divergence and adaptation in co-distributed species can bring us closer to understanding how landscapes affect biodiversity. The Sargo, Anisotremus davidsonii (Haemulidae), and the Longjaw mudsucker, Gillichthys mirabilis (Gobiidae), offer a notable framework to study such mechanisms as their Pacific populations cross phylogeographic breaks at Point Conception, California, USA, and Punta Eugenia, Mexico, and are separated to those in the Sea of Cortez by the Baja California peninsula. Here, thousands...

Speciation and gene flow across an elevational gradient in New Guinea kingfishers

Ethan Linck, Benjamin Freeman & John Dumbacher
Closely related species with parapatric elevational ranges are ubiquitous in tropical mountains worldwide. The gradient speciation hypothesis proposes that these series are the result of in situ ecological speciation driven by divergent selection across elevation. Direct tests of this scenario have been hampered by the difficulty inferring the geographic arrangement of populations at the time of divergence. In cichlids, sticklebacks, and Timema stick insects, support for ecological speciation driven by other selective pressures has come...

Do alignment and trimming methods matter for phylogenomic (UCE) analyses?

Daniel Portik & John Wiens
Alignment is a crucial issue in molecular phylogenetics because different alignment methods can potentially yield very different topologies for individual genes. But it is unclear if the choice of alignment methods remains important in phylogenomic analyses, which incorporate data from dozens, hundreds, or thousands of genes. For example, problematic biases in alignment might be multiplied across many loci, whereas alignment errors in individual genes might become irrelevant. The issue of alignment trimming (i.e. removing poorly...

Macroevolutionary patterns of sexual size dimorphism among African tree frogs (Family: Hyperoliidae)

Daniel Portik, David Blackburn & Jimmy McGuire
Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is shaped by multiple selective forces that drive the evolution of sex-specific body size, resulting in male or female-biased SSD. Stronger selection on one sex can result in an allometric body-size scaling relationship consistent with Rensch’s rule or its converse. Anurans (frogs and toads) generally display female-biased SSD, but there is variation across clades and the mechanisms driving the evolution of SSD remain poorly understood. We investigated these topics in a...

Data from: Multilocus phylogeny of Gryllus field crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllidae: Gryllinae) utilizing anchored hybrid enrichment

David Gray, David Weissman, Jeffrey Cole, Emily Lemmon & Alan Lemmon
We present the first comprehensive molecular phylogeny of Gryllus field cricket species found in the United States and Canada, select additional named Gryllus species found in Mexico and the Bahamas, plus the European field cricket G. campestris Linnaeus and the Afro-Eurasian cricket G. bimaculatus De Geer. Acheta, Teleogryllus, and Nigrogryllus were used as outgroups. Anchored hybrid enrichment was used to generate 492,531 base pairs of DNA sequence from 563 loci. RAxML analysis of concatenated sequence...

Alignments of Sequence Data for Phylogenetic Analysis of Damsel

Emily McFarland, Carole Baldwin, D Ross Robertson, Luiz Rocha & Luke Tornabene
Initially described in 1882, Chromis enchrysurus, the Yellowtail Reeffish, was redescribed in 1982 to account for an observed color morph that possesses a white tail instead of a yellow one, but morphological and geographic boundaries between the two color morphs were not well understood. Taking advantage of newly collected material from submersible studies of deep reefs and photographs from rebreather dives, we sought to determine whether the white-tailed Chromis is actually a color morph of...

Data from: Comparisons of Late Ordovician ecosystem dynamics before and after the Richmondian Invasion reveal consequences of invasive species in benthic marine paleocommunities

Hannah Kempf, Ian Castro, Ashley Dineen, Carrie Tyler & Peter Roopnarine
A thorough understanding of how communities respond to extreme changes, such as biotic invasions, is essential to manage ecosystems today. Here we constructed fossil food webs to identify changes in Late Ordovician (Katian) shallow marine paleocommunity structure and functioning before and after the Richmondian Invasion, a well-documented ancient invasion. Food webs were compared using descriptive metrics and Cascading Extinction on Graphs models. Richness at intermediate trophic levels was underrepresented when using only data from the...

Registration Year

  • 2020
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Affiliations

  • California Academy of Sciences
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