15 Works

Supplementary information for aquatic and blood-feeding Diptera

Nina Pak, Allan Cabrero, Keith Bayless & Michelle Trautwein
Aquatic Diptera are some of the most diverse and notable flies, impacting human health and providing ecosystem services. Despite the importance of aquatic Diptera, the evolution of aquatic life history and blood-feeding, are not sufficiently understood. Here, we examine the evolution of aquatic life histories and their associations with blood-feeding across Diptera. Aquatic and blood-feeding Diptera are phylogenetically conserved across the fly tree of life. We found evidence that the most recent common ancestor of...

Spatial phylogenomics of acrobat ants in Madagascar—mountains function as cradles for recent diversity and endemism

Gabriela P. Camacho, Ana Carolina Loss, Brian L. Fisher & Bonnie B. Blaimer
Aim: A crucial step to protecting biodiversity is assessing species diversity and endemism. We delineate spatial patterns of diversity in Malagasy ants on a phylogenetic and taxonomic level to identify centers of diversity and endemism, and evaluate the ‘museum vs cradle’ hypothesis with regard to ant endemism. Location: Madagascar Taxon: Ants, genus Crematogaster. Methods: We estimated distribution models for 33 Crematogaster species and generated a phylogeny based on ultraconserved elements. We calculated species richness (SR),...

Data from: Ecological and environmental stability in offshore Southern California Marine Basins through the Holocene

Hannah Palmer, Tessa Hill, Esther Kennedy, Peter Roopnarine, Sonali Langlois, Katherine Reyes & Lowell Stott
In the face of ongoing marine deoxygenation, understanding timescales and drivers of past oxygenation change is of critical importance. Marine sediment cores from tiered silled basins provide a natural laboratory to constrain timing and implications of oxygenation changes across multiple depths. Here, we reconstruct oxygenation and environmental change over time using benthic foraminiferal assemblages from sediment cores from three basins across the Southern California Borderlands: Tanner Basin (EW9504-09PC, 1194 m water depth), San Nicolas Basin...

A target enrichment probe set for resolving the flagellate land plant tree of life

Jesse W. Breinholt, Sarah B. Carey, George P. Tiley, E. Christine Davis, Lorena Endara, Stuart F. McDaniel, Leandro Neves, Emily B. Sessa, Matt Von Konrat, Susan Fawcett, Stefanie M. Ickert-Bond, Paulo H. Labiak, Juan Larraín, Marcus Lehnert, Lily R. Lewis, Nathalie S. Nagalingum, Nikisha Patel, Stefan A. Rensing, Weston Testo, Alejandra Vasco, Juan Carlos Villarreal, Evelyn Webb Williams, J. Gordon Burleigh, Sahut Chantanaorrapint, Leandro G. Neves … & Stefanie M. Ickert‐Bond
Premise of the Study: New sequencing technologies enable the possibility of generating large-scale molecular datasets for constructing the plant tree of life. We describe a new probe set for target enrichment sequencing to generate nuclear sequence data to build phylogenetic trees with any flagellate land plants, including hornworts, liverworts, mosses, lycophytes, ferns, and all gymnosperms. Methods and Results: We leveraged existing transcriptome and genome sequence data to design a set of 56,989 probes for target...

Evolutionary drivers of sexual signal variation in Amazon slender anoles

Ivan Prates, Annelise D'Angiolella, Miguel Rodrigues, Paulo Melo-Sampaio, Kevin De Queiroz & Rayna Bell
Phenotypic variation among populations, as seen in the signaling traits of many species, provides an opportunity to test whether similar factors generate repeated phenotypic patterns in different parts of a species’ range. We investigated whether genetic divergence, abiotic gradients, and sympatry with closely related species explain variation in the dewlap colors of Amazon Slender Anoles, Anolis fuscoauratus. To this aim, we characterized dewlap diversity in the field with respect to population genetic structure and evolutionary...

A high-quality carabid genome provides insights into beetle genome evolution and cold adaptation

Yi-Ming Weng, Charlotte Francoeur, Cameron Currie, David Kavanaugh & Sean Schoville
The hyper-diverse order Coleoptera comprises a staggering ~25% of known species on Earth. Despite recent breakthroughs in next generation sequencing, there remains a limited representation of beetle diversity in assembled genomes. Most notably, the ground beetle family Carabidae, comprising more than 40,000 described species, has not been studied in a comparative genomics framework using whole genome data. Here we generate a high-quality genome assembly for Nebria riversi, to examine sources of novelty in the genome...

Data From: Phylogenomics reveals accelerated late Cretaceous diversification of bee flies (Diptera: Bombyliidae)

Xuankun Li, Luisa C. Teasdale, Keith M. Bayless, Allan G. Ellis, Brian M. Wiegmann, Carlos José E. Lamas, Christine L. Lambkin, Neal L. Evenhuis, James A. Nicholls, Diana Hartley, Seunggwan Shin, Michelle Trautwein, Andreas Zwick, Bryan D. Lessard & David K. Yeates
Bombyliidae is a very species-rich and widespread family of parasitoid flies with more than 250 genera classified into 17 extant subfamilies. However, little is known about their evolutionary history or how their present-day diversity was shaped. Transcriptomes of 15 species and anchored hybrid enrichment (AHE) sequence captures of 86 species, representing 94 bee fly species and 14 subfamilies, were used to reconstruct the phylogeny of Bombyliidae. We integrated data from transcriptomes across each of the...

Drainage basins serve as multiple glacial refugia for alpine habitats in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, California

Yi-Ming Weng, Sean Schoville & David Kavanaugh
The evolutionary histories of alpine species are often directly associated with responses to glaciation. Deep divergence among populations and complex patterns of genetic variation have been inferred as consequences of persistence within glacier boundaries (i.e. on nunataks), while shallow divergence and limited genetic variation is assumed to result from expansion from large refugia at the edge of ice shields (i.e. massifs de refuge). However, for some species, dependence on specific microhabitats could profoundly influence their...

The Easter Egg Weevil (Pachyrhynchus) genome reveals syntenic patterns in Coleoptera across 200 million years of evolution

Matthew Van Dam, Analyn Anzano Cabras, James B. Henderson, Andrew J. Rominger, Cynthia Pérez Estrada, Arina D. Omer, Olga Dudchenko, Erez Lieberman Aiden & Athena W. Lam
Patterns of genomic architecture across insects remain largely undocumented or decoupled from a broader phylogenetic context. For instance, it is unknown whether translocation rates differ between insect orders. We address broad scale patterns of genome architecture across Insecta by examining synteny in a phylogenetic framework from open-source insect genomes. To accomplish this, we add a chromosome level genome to a crucial lineage, Coleoptera. Our assembly of the Pachyrhynchus sulphureomaculatus genome is the first chromosome scale...

Evidence for niche conservatism in alpine beetles under a climate-driven species pump model

Jillian Schat, Yi-Ming Weng, Roman Dudko, David Kavanaugh, Lan Luo & Sean Schoville
Aim Past glacial climate cycles have generated lineage diversity in alpine habitats, acting as a climate-driven species pump. It is not clear how much this process contributes to ecological diversification of alpine species. To examine this problem, we test patterns of genetic and phenotypic divergence in two co-distributed species complexes of flightless alpine ground beetles. Greater differentiation in ecologically-important functional traits would indicate that ecological selection is an outcome of oscillating climate change, whereas greater...

Testing the causes of richness patterns in the paleotropics: time and diversification in cycads (Cycadaceae)

Jian Liu, Anders Lindstrom, Nathalie Nagalingum, John Wiens & Xun Gong
The paleotropics harbor many biodiversity hotspots and show many different species richness patterns. However, it remains unclear which factors are the most important in directly shaping richness patterns among regions in the paleotropics (i.e. diversification rates, colonization times, dispersal frequency). Here we used Cycadaceae as a model system to test the causes of regional richness patterns in the paleotropics. Specifically we tested the roles of dispersal frequency, colonization time, diversification rates, and their combined role...

Phylogeny of the supertribe Nebriitae (Coleoptera: Carabidae) based on analyses of DNA sequence data

David H. Kavanaugh, David Maddison, W. Brian Simison, Sean D. Schoville, Joachim Schmidt, Arnaud Faille, Wendy Moore, James M. Pflug, Sophie L. Archambeault, Tinya Hoang & Jei-Ying Chen
The phylogeny of the carabid beetle supertribe Nebriitae is inferred from analyses of DNA sequence data from eight gene fragments including one nuclear ribosomal gene (28S), four nuclear-protein coding genes (CAD, topoisomerase 1, PEPCK and wingless) and three mitochondrial gene fragments (16S + tRNA-Leu + ND1, COI (“barcode” region) and COI (“Pat/Jer” region)). Our taxon sample included 264 exemplars representing 241 species and subspecies (25% of the known nebriite fauna), 39 of 41 currently accepted...

Data from: Functional innovation promotes diversification of form in the evolution of an ultrafast trap-jaw mechanism

Douglas Booher, Joshua Gibson, Cong Liu, John Longino, Brian Fisher, Milan Janda, Nitish Narula, Evropi Toulkeridou, Alexander Mikheyev, Andrew Suarez & Evan Economo
Evolutionary innovations underlie the rise of diversity and complexity—the two long-term trends in the history of life. How does natural selection redesign multiple interacting parts to achieve a new emergent function? We investigated the evolution of a biomechanical innovation, the latch-spring mechanism of trap-jaw ants, to address two outstanding evolutionary problems: how form and function change in a system during the evolution of new complex traits, and whether such innovations and the diversity they beget...

Providing virtual nature experiences to incarcerated men reduces stress and increases interest in the environment

James Ruff, Nalini Nadkarni, Tierney Thys, Allison Anholt, Jeff Treviño, Sara Yeo, Nalini M. Nadkarni, Tierney M. Thys, James S. Ruff & Sara K. Yeo
Humans gain multiple health benef­­­its through contact with the green and blue parts of the world . However, many people do not have access to such places, including more than two million adults who are incarcerated. Building on studies that have shown positive emotional and mood effects when inmates in solitary confinement were exposed to nature videos featuring non-human built environments in their cellblocks, we measured physiological effects of interventions of nature visual imagery and...

Population connectivity across a highly fragmented distribution: Phylogeography of the Chalcophaps doves

Devon DeRaad, Joseph Manthey, Emily Ostrow, Lucas DeCicco, Michael Andersen, Peter Hosner, Hannah Shult, Leo Joseph, John Dumbacher & Robert Moyle
Chalcophaps is a morphologically conserved genus of ground-walking doves distributed from India to mainland China, south to Australia, and across the western Pacific to Vanuatu. Here, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of this genus using DNA sequence data from two nuclear genes and one mitochondrial gene, sampled from throughout the geographic range of Chalcophaps. We find support for three major evolutionary lineages in our phylogenetic reconstruction, each corresponding to the three currently recognized Chalcophaps species....

Registration Year

  • 2021
    15

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    15

Affiliations

  • California Academy of Sciences
    15
  • University of California, Berkeley
    2
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    2
  • University of Wisconsin–Madison
    2
  • University of Sao Paulo
    2
  • University of Arizona
    2
  • University of Utah
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • Australian National Insect Collection
    1
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1