269 Works

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) greenhouse gas fluxes in saltmarsh and mudflat habitats

C. Golléty, I. Davidson & D.M. Paterson
The dataset details greenhouse gas fluxes as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) across six intertidal sites in the winter and summer of 2013. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England, each of these sites consisted of a saltmarsh area and adjacent mudflat area, twenty two sampling quadrats were placed on each area. Light and dark incubations...

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) surface sediment chlorophyll concentrations in saltmarsh and mudflat habitats

J. Maunder & D.M. Paterson
The dataset details surface sediment chlorophyll concentrations across six intertidal sites in the winter and summer of 2013. Chlorophyll concentrations in surface sediments (<2mm) provide a quantitative measure of the microphytobenthos (MPB) community present. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England, each of these sites consisted of a saltmarsh area and adjacent mudflat area, twenty two sampling quadrats were placed...

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) meteorological data from Cartmel Sands, Morecambe

T.C. Hill & M. Chocholek
The meteorological data describes the air and soil temperatures, net radiation balance, down-welling photosynthetically active radiation, wind speed, wind direction and the vapour pressure deficit. Data collection was carried out at Cartmel Sands marsh from the 31st of May 2013 till the 26th of January 2015. The Cartmel Sands site is in Morecambe, North West England, and the meteorological tower was situated in the middle of the marsh. This data was collected as part of...

Risk of Phytophthora infection in woodland and larch fragments across Scotland

B.V. Purse, A. Schlenzig, C. Harris & K. Searle
These spatial layers contain risk factors and overall risk scores, representing relative risk of Phytophthora infection (Phytophthora ramorum and P. kernoviae), for Core Native Woodland and known larch fragments across Scotland. Risk factors include climate suitability, proximity to road and river networks and suitability of habitat for key hosts of Phytophthora and were broadly concurrent with the period between 2007 and 2013. This research was funded by the Scottish Government under research contract CR/2008/55, 'Study...

Data Collected During Simultaneous Neutron Powder Diffraction and Microwave Characterisation at Elevated Temperatures

Michael Barter, Gemma Smith, Sihai Yang, Martin Schröder, Martin Owen Jones & Adrian Porch
This dataset contains data collected during simultaneous neutron diffraction and microwave characterisation of a metal-organic framework (MOF), MFM-170, at elevated temperatures. The experiment consisted of the desolvation of the as synthesised MOF sample by flowing nitrogen gas heated to 150 °C through the sample, followed by rehydration of the sample by flowing air through the sample, and subsequent desolvation at a higher flow rate. Temperatures throughout the experiment are given (time and temperature) along with...

Physical and biogeochemical measurements of belowground biomass and carbon content from Scottish salt marshes, 2021

L.C. Miller, C. Smeaton, A. Garbutt & W.E.N. Austin
The dataset comprises of physical and biogeochemical measurements of belowground (root) biomass from across four Scottish saltmarshes. Sites were chosen to represent contrasting habitats types in Scotland, in particular sediment types, vegetation and sea level history. The data provide a quantitative measure of belowground (root) biomass, organic carbon content and belowground (root) carbon. Samples were collected using a wide gauge gouge corer. The samples were processed to determine belowground (root) biomass, the organic carbon was...

Dry bulk density, loss on ignition and organic carbon content of surficial soils from English and Welsh salt marshes 2019

P. Ruranska, C.J.T. Ladd, C. Smeaton, M.W. Skov & W.E.N. Austin
The data provide a quantitative measure of the dry bulk density, soil texture, organic matter content (LOI) and organic carbon present within surface soils (up to a depth of 10 cm). A total of 212 samples from 49 sites across England and Wales were collected using modified syringe samplers as part of the citizen scientist programme CarbonQuest, part of Carbon Storage in Intertidal Environments (C-SIDE) project. Sites were chosen to represent contrasting habitats across England...

Data from: Inter- and intra-specific genomic divergence in Drosophila montana shows evidence for cold adaptation

Darren J. Parker, R. Axel W. Wiberg, Urmi Trivedi, Venera I. Tyukmaeva, Karim Gharbi, Roger K. Butlin, Anneli Hoikkala, Maaria Kankare & Michael G. Ritchie
D. montana gff fileGenome annotation file for D. montana genome (Accession number: LUVX00000000)D.mont_freeze_v1.4.gff.txt

Data from: Distance sampling with camera traps

Eric J. Howe, Steven T. Buckland, Marie-Lyne Després-Einspenner, Hjalmar S. Kühl & Stephen T. Buckland
Reliable estimates of animal density and abundance are essential for effective wildlife conservation and management. Camera trapping has proven efficient for sampling multiple species, but statistical estimators of density from camera trapping data for species that cannot be individually identified are still in development. We extend point-transect methods for estimating animal density to accommodate data from camera traps, allowing researchers to exploit existing distance sampling theory and software for designing studies and analysing data. We...

Data from: Patterns of phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation in the wide elevation range of the alpine plant Arabis alpina

Pierre De Villemereuil, Médéric Mouterde, Oscar E. Gaggiotti & Irène Till-Bottraud
Local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity are two important characteristics of alpine plants to overcome the threats caused by global changes. Among alpine species, Arabis alpina is characterised by an unusually wide altitudinal amplitude, ranging from 800 to 3,100 m of elevation in the French Alps. Two non‐exclusive hypotheses can explain the presence of A. alpina across this broad ecological gradient: adaptive phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation, making this species especially useful to better understand these...

Data from: Responses of bottlenose dolphins and harbor porpoises to impact and vibration piling noise during harbor construction

Isla M. Graham, Enrico Pirotta, Nathan D. Merchant, Adrian Farcas, Tim R. Barton, Barbara Cheney, Gordon D. Hastie & Paul M. Thompson
The development of risk assessments for the exposure of protected populations to noise from coastal construction is constrained by uncertainty over the nature and extent of marine mammal responses to man-made noise. Stakeholder concern often focuses on the potential for local displacement caused by impact piling, where piles are hammered into the seabed. To mitigate this threat, use of vibration piling, where piles are shaken into place with a vibratory hammer, is often encouraged due...

Data from: Reticulate evolution within a spruce (Picea) species complex revealed by population genomic analysis

Yongshuai Sun, Richard J. Abbott, Zhiqiang Lu, Kangshan Mao, Lei Zhang, Xiaojuan Wang, Dafu Ru & Jianquan Liu
The role of reticulation in the rapid diversification of organisms is attracting greater attention in evolutionary biology. Here, we report a population genomics approach to test the role of hybridization and introgression in the evolution of the Picea likiangensis species complex. Based on 84,793 SNPs detected in transcriptomes of 82 trees collected from 35 localities, we identified 18 hybrids (including backcrosses) distributed within the range boundaries of the four taxa. Coalescent simulations, for each pair...

Data from: Genome sequence of dwarf birch (Betula nana) and cross-species RAD markers

Nian Wang, Marian Thomson, William J. A. Bodles, Robert M. M. Crawford, Harriet V. Hunt, Alan Watson Featherstone, Jaume Pellicer & Richard J. A. Buggs
New sequencing technologies allow development of genome-wide markers for any genus of ecological interest, including plant genera such as Betula (birch) that have previously proved difficult to study due to widespread polyploidy and hybridisation. We present a de novo reference genome sequence assembly, from 67X short read coverage, of Betula nana (dwarf birch) – a diploid that is the keystone woody species of sub-arctic scrub communities but of conservation concern in Britain. We also present...

Data from: Quantifying episodes of sexual selection: insights from a transparent worm with fluorescent sperm

Lucas Marie-Orleach, Tim Janicke, Dita Brigida Vizoso, Patrice David & Lukas Schärer
Sexual selection operates through consecutive episodes of selection that ultimately contribute to the observed variance in reproductive success between individuals. Understanding the relative importance of these episodes is challenging, particularly because the relevant post-copulatory fitness components are often difficult to assess. Here we investigate different episodes of sexual selection on the male sex function, by assessing how (pre-copulatory) mating success, and (post-copulatory) sperm-transfer efficiency and sperm-fertilising efficiency contribute to male reproductive success. Specifically, we used...

Data from: Effects of spring temperatures on the strength of selection on timing of reproduction in a long-distance migratory bird

Marcel E. Visser, Phillip Gienapp, Arild Husby, Michael Morrisey, Iván De La Hera, Francisco Pulido & Christiaan Both
Climate change has differentially affected the timing of seasonal events for interacting trophic levels, and this has often led to increased selection on seasonal timing. Yet, the environmental variables driving this selection have rarely been identified, limiting our ability to predict future ecological impacts of climate change. Using a dataset spanning 31 years from a natural population of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), we show that directional selection on timing of reproduction intensified in the first...

Data from: A 2.6‐g sound and movement tag for studying the acoustic scene and kinematics of echolocating bats

Laura Stidsholt, Mark Johnson, Kristian Beedholm, Lasse Jakobsen, Kathrin Kugler, Signe Brinkløv, Angeles Salles, Cynthia F. Moss & Peter Teglberg Madsen
1. To study sensorimotor behaviour in wild animals, it is necessary to synchronously record the sensory inputs available to the animal, and its movements. To do this, we have developed a biologging device that can record the primary sensory information and the associated movements during foraging and navigating in echolocating bats. 2. This 2.6 -gram tag records the sonar calls and echoes from an ultrasonic microphone, while simultaneously sampling fine-scale movement in three dimensions from...

Data from: Tracking marine mammals in 3D using electronic tag data

Christophe Laplanche, Tiago A. Marques & Len Thomas
1. Information about at-depth behaviour of marine mammals is fundamental yet very hard to obtain from direct visual observation. Animal-borne multisensor electronic tags provide a unique window of observation into such behaviours. 2. Electronic tag sensors allow the estimation of the animal's 3-dimensional (3D) orientation, depth and speed. Using tag flow noise level to provide an estimate of animal speed, we extend existing approaches of 3D track reconstruction by allowing the direction of movement to...

Data from: Automated peak detection method for behavioral event identification: detecting Balaenoptera musculus and Grampus griseus feeding attempts

David A. Sweeney, Stacy L. DeRuiter, Ye Joo McNamara-Oh, Tiago A. Marques, Patricia Arranz & John Calambokidis
The desire of animal behaviorists for more flexible methods of conducting inter-study and inter-specific comparisons and meta-analysis of various animal behaviors compelled us to design an automated, animal behavior peak detection method that is potentially generalizable to a wide variety of data types, animals, and behaviors. We detected the times of feeding attempts by 12 Risso’s dolphins (Grampus griseus) and 36 blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) using the norm-jerk (rate of change of acceleration) time series....

Data from: Range-dependent flexibility in the acoustic field of view of echolocating porpoises (Phocoena phocoena)

Danuta M. Wisniewska, John M. Ratcliffe, Kristian Beedholm, Christian B. Christensen, Mark Johnson, Jens C. Koblitz, Magnus Wahlberg & Peter M. Madsen
Toothed whales use sonar to detect, locate, and track prey. They adjust emitted sound intensity, auditory sensitivity and click rate to target range, and terminate prey pursuits with high-repetition-rate, low-intensity buzzes. However, their narrow acoustic field of view (FOV) is considered stable throughout target approach, which could facilitate prey escape at close-range. Here, we show that, like some bats, harbour porpoises can broaden their biosonar beam during the terminal phase of attack but, unlike bats,...

Data from: Sound exposure in harbour seals during the installation of an offshore wind farm: predictions of auditory damage

Gordon D. Hastie, Deborah J. F. Russell, Bernie McConnell, Simon Moss, Dave Thompson, Vincent M. Janik & Deborah J.F. Russell
1. With ambitious renewable energy targets, pile driving associated with offshore wind farm construction will become widespread in the marine environment. Many proposed wind farms overlap with the distribution of seals, and sound from pile driving has the potential to cause auditory damage. 2. We report on a behavioural study during the construction of a wind farm using data from GPS/GSM tags on 24 harbour seals Phoca vitulina L. Pile driving data and acoustic propagation...

Data from: Titi monkey call sequences vary with predator location and type

Cristiane Cäsar, Klaus Zuberbuhler, Robert J. Young & Richard W. Byrne
Animal alarm calls can encode information about a predator’s category, size, distance or threat level. In non-human primates, alarm calls typically refer to broad classes of disturbances, in some instances to specific predators. Here, we present the results of a field experiment with a New World primate, the black-fronted titi monkey, designed to explore the information conveyed by their alarm call system. Adults produced sequences consisting of two main alarm call types that conveyed, in...

Data from: Familiarity affects social network structure and discovery of prey patch locations in foraging stickleback shoals

Nicola Atton, Bennett J. Galef, William Hoppitt, Mike M. Webster & Kevin N. Laland
Numerous factors affect the fine-scale social structure of animal groups, but it is unclear how important such factors are in determining how individuals encounter resources. Familiarity affects shoal choice and structure in many social fishes. Here, we show that familiarity between shoal members of sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) affects both fine-scale social organization and the discovery of resources. Social network analysis revealed that sticklebacks remained closer to familiar than to unfamiliar individuals within the same shoal....

Data from: Age-dependent social learning in a lizard

Daniel W. A. Noble, Richard W. Byrne & Martin J. Whiting
Evidence of social learning, whereby the actions of an animal facilitate the acquisition of new information by another, is taxonomically biased towards mammals, especially primates, and birds. However, social learning need not be limited to group-living animals because species with less interaction can still benefit from learning about potential predators, food sources, rivals and mates. We trained male skinks (Eulamprus quoyii), a mostly solitary lizard from eastern Australia, in a two-step foraging task. Lizards belonging...

Data from: Detecting cryptic indirect genetic effects

Nathan W. Bailey & Jessica L. Hoskins
Indirect genetic effects (IGEs) occur when genes expressed in one individual alter the phenotype of an interacting partner. IGEs can dramatically affect the expression and evolution of social traits. However, the interacting phenotype(s) through which they are transmitted are often unknown, or cryptic, and their detection would enhance our ability to accurately predict evolutionary change. To illustrate this challenge and possible solutions to it, we assayed male leg tapping behaviour using inbred lines of Drosophila...

Data from: Impact of wild prey availability on livestock predation by snow leopards

Kulbhushansingh R. Suryawanshi, Stephen M. Redpath, Yash Veer Bhatnagar, Uma Ramakrishnan, Vaibhav Chaturvedi, Sophie C. Smout & Charudutt Mishra
An increasing proportion of the world's poor is rearing livestock today, and the global livestock population is growing. Livestock predation by large carnivores and their retaliatory killing is becoming an economic and conservation concern. A common recommendation for carnivore conservation and for reducing predation on livestock is to increase wild prey populations based on the assumption that the carnivores will consume this alternative food. Livestock predation, however, could either reduce or intensify with increases in...

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