278 Works

Deep-diving beaked whales dive together but forage apart

Jesús Alcázar Treviño, Mark Johnson, Patricia Arranz, Victoria Warren, Carlos Pérez-González, Tiago Marques, Peter Madsen & Natacha Aguilar De Soto
Echolocating animals that forage in social groups can potentially benefit from eavesdropping on other group members, cooperative foraging or social defence, but may also face problems of acoustic interference and intra-group competition for prey. Here, we investigated these potential trade-offs of sociality for extreme deep-diving Blainville´s and Cuvier’s beaked whales. These species perform highly synchronous group dives as a presumed predator-avoidance behaviour but the benefits and costs of this on foraging have not been investigated....

Echolocating toothed whales use ultra-fast echo-kinetic responses to track evasive prey

Heather Vance, Peter Madsen, Natacha Aguilar De Soto, Danuta Wisniewska, Michael Ladegaard, Sascha Hooker & Mark Johnson
Visual predators rely on fast-acting optokinetic responses to track and capture agile prey. Most toothed whales, however, rely on echolocation for hunting and have converged on biosonar clicking rates reaching 500/s during prey pu rsuits. If echoes are processed on a click by click basis, as assumed, neural responses 100x faster than those in vision are required to keep pace with this information flow. Using high resolution bio-logging of wild predator prey interactions we show...

Adverse positioning in mammography - observations of imaging features

Patsy Whelehan
This dataset consists of observations of mammographic images, plus three relevant variables used in the validation process for the measure of adverse positioning we developed based on the dataset. An expert observer generated the primary data by reviewing mammographic images to judge the presence or absence of a set of features developed through theory and consultation with other experts. The data can be reused by anyone wishing to learn and practice psychometric validation techniques, for...

ARISE project - Work package 3: Stable nitrogen isotopes of bulk tissue and amino-acids of ringed seals muscle and teeth's growth layer groups of harp seals from the Arctic and sub-Arctic

Camille de la Vega, Joanna Kershaw, David J Yurkowski, Steven H Ferguson, Garry B Stenson, Tore Haug, Martin Biuw, Anne K Frie, Sophie C Smout, Rachel M Jeffreys & Claire Mahaffey
This dataset includes stable nitrogen isotopes of bulk tissue (δ15Nbulk) and compound specific stable nitrogen isotopes on amino acids (δ15NAA) measured in harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) teeth from Southern Barents Sea, Greenland Sea, Northwest Atlantic, and ringed seal (Pusa hispida) muscles from Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Baffin Island, in the Arctic and sub-Arctic. Teeth of harp seals from the Northwest Atlantic (n=48) were taken from archives in Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) St John's, Canada...

The value of considering demographic contributions to connectivity - a review

Joseph Drake, Xavier Lambin & Christopher Sutherland
Connectivity is a central concept in ecology, wildlife management and conservation science. Understanding the role of connectivity in determining species persistence is increasingly important in the face of escalating anthropogenic impacts on climate and habitat. These connectivity augmenting processes can severely impact species distributions and community and ecosystem functioning. One general definition of connectivity is an emergent process arising from a set of spatial interdependencies between individuals or populations, and increasingly realistic representations of connectivity...

Platinum incorporation into titanate perovskites to deliver emergent active and stable platinum nanoparticles (dataset)

Maadhav Kothari, Yukwon Jeon & John Thomas Sirr Irvine

Cetacean sightings from the British Antarctic Survey CCAMLR synoptic krill survey of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, January to February 2019

Mick Baines, Maren Reichelt, Claire Lacey, Simon Pinder, Sophie Fielding & Jennifer A Jackson
Cetacean sightings in South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands waters, made by a team of four professional marine mammal observers during the British Antarctic Survey CCAMLR synoptic krill survey on the RRS James Cook (DY098), January and February 2019. The latitude and longitude of each sighting, the identified species, bearing and distance from the vessel, and estimated group size are provided. These data have been used by BAS to estimate (i) humpback whale and (ii)...

Fin whale tracks Elephant Island

Helena Herr, Leigh Hickmott, Sacha Viquerat & Simone Panigada
This data set comprises the the location data obtained via SPLASH LIMPET tags from four fin whales equipped with satellite transmitters at Elephant Island Antarctica in April / March 2021. Provided are the tag identifier (Ptt), transmitter model (instrument), the data and time of each recorded location, the satellite system used for transmission (type), a quality rating of the transmission (quality) as B, A, 0, 1, 2 or 3 in increasing order of position accuracy,...

Pocket delipidation induced by membrane tension or modification leads to a structurally analogous mechanosensitive channel state

Bolin Wang, Benjamin Lane, Charalampos Kapsalis, James Ault, Frank Sobott, Hassane El Mkami, Antonio Calabrese, Antreas Kalli & Christos Pliotas
Experimental data: Raw data for 3pESEEM time-domain traces. Computational data: Raw molecular dynamic simulation trajectories.

Data from: Environmental drivers of population-level variation in the migratory and diving ontogeny of an Arctic top predator

James Grecian, Garry Stenson, Martin Biuw, Lars Boehme, Lars Folkow, Pierre Goulet, Ian Jonsen, Aleksander Malde, Erling S. Nordøy, Aqqalu Rosing-Asvid & Sophie Smout
The development of migratory strategies that enable juveniles to survive to recruitment is critical for species that exploit seasonal niches. For animals that forage via breath-hold diving this requires a combination of both physiological and foraging skill development. Here, we assess how migratory and dive behaviour develop over the first months of life for a migratory Arctic top predator, the harp seal, tracked using animal-borne satellite relay data loggers. We reveal similarities in migratory movements...

Data from: The evolution of primate general and cultural intelligence

Simon M. Reader, Yfke Hager & Kevin N. Laland
There are consistent individual differences in human intelligence, attributable to a single ‘general intelligence’ factor, g. The evolutionary basis of g and its links to social learning and culture remain controversial. Conflicting hypotheses regard primate cognition as divided into specialized, independently evolving modules versus a single general process. To assess how processes underlying culture relate to one another and other cognitive capacities, we compiled ecologically relevant cognitive measures from multiple domains, namely reported incidences of...

Data from: First direct measurements of behavioural responses by Cuvier’s beaked whales to mid-frequency active sonar

Stacy L. DeRuiter, Brandon L. Southall, John Calambokidis, Walter M. X. Zimmer, Dinara Sadykova, Erin A. Falcone, Ari S. Friedlaender, John E. Joseph, David Moretti, Gregory S. Schorr, Len Thomas & Peter L. Tyack
Most marine mammal strandings coincident with naval sonar exercises have involved Cuvier’s beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris). We recorded acoustic and animal movement data on two tagged Ziphius and obtained the first direct measurements of behavioural responses of this species to mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar signals. Each recording included a 30-minute playback (one 1.6-s simulated MFA sonar signal repeated every 25 s); one whale was also incidentally exposed to MFA sonar from distant naval exercises. Whales...

Data from: Socially flexible female choice and premating isolation in field crickets (Teleogryllus spp.)

Nathan W. Bailey & Elaine Macleod
Social influences on mate choice are predicted to influence evolutionary divergence of closely-related taxa, because of the key role mate choice plays in reproductive isolation. However, it is unclear whether females choosing between heterospecific and conspecific male signals use previously experienced social information in the same manner or to the same extent that they do when discriminating among conspecific mates only. We tested this using two field cricket sister species (Teleogryllus oceanicus and T. commodus)...

Data from: Interspecific crossing and genetic mapping reveal intrinsic genomic incompatibility between two Senecio species that form a hybrid zone on Mount Etna, Sicily

Adrian C. Brennan, Simon J. Hiscock & Richard J. Abbott
Studies of hybridizing species can reveal much about the genetic basis and maintenance of species divergence in the face of gene flow. Here we report a genetic segregation and linkage analysis conducted on F2 progeny of a reciprocal cross between Senecio aethnensis and S. chrysanthemifolius that form a hybrid zone on Mount Etna, Sicily, aimed at determining the genetic basis of intrinsic hybrid barriers between them. Significant transmission ratio distortion (TRD) was detected at 34...

Data from: Environmental complexity influences association network structure and network-based diffusion of foraging information in fish shoals

Mike M. Webster, Nicola Atton, William J. E. Hoppitt & Kevin N. Laland
Socially transmitted information can significantly affect the ways in which animals interact with their environments. We used network-based diffusion analysis, a novel and powerful tool for exploring information transmission, to model the rate at which sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) discovered prey patches, comparing shoals foraging in open and structured environments. We found that for groups in the open environment, individuals tended to recruit to both the prey patch and empty comparison patches at similar times, suggesting...

Data from: History and evolution of alpine plants endemic to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau: Aconitum gymnandrum (Ranunculaceae)

Liuyang Wang, Richard Abbott, Wei Zheng, Ping Chen, Yujin Wang & Jianquan Liu
How Quaternary climatic oscillations affected range distributions and intraspecific divergence of alpine plants on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) remains largely unknown. Here we report a survey of chloroplast (cp) and nuclear ribosomal (ITS) DNA variation aimed at exploring the phylogeographic history of the QTP alpine endemic Aconitum gymnandrum. We sequenced three cpDNA fragments (rpl20-rps12 intergenic spacer, the trnV intron and psbA-trnH spacer) and also the nuclear (ITS) region in 245 individuals from 23 populations sampled...

Data from: Genetics of incipient speciation in Drosophila mojavensis. III. Life history divergence in allopatry and reproductive isolation

William J. Etges, Cássia Cardoso De Oliveira, Mohamed A. F. Noor & Michael G. Ritchie
We carried out a three-tiered genetic analysis of egg-to-adult development time and viability in ancestral and derived populations of cactophilic D. mojavensis to test the hypothesis that evolution of these life history characters has shaped premating reproductive isolation in this species. First, a common garden experiment with 11 populations from Baja California and mainland Mexico and Arizona reared on two host cacti revealed significant host plant X region and population interactions for viability and development...

Data from: Two distinct genomic regions, harbouring the period and fruitless genes, affect male courtship song in Drosophila montana

Malgorzata Lagisz, Shuo-Yang Wen, Jarkko Routtu, Kirsten Klappert, Dominique Mazzi, Ramiro Morales-Hojas, Jorge Vieira, Anneli Hoikkala, Michael G. Ritchie, Roger K. Butlin, Martin A Schäfer & S-Y Wen
Acoustic signals often play a significant role in pair formation and in species recognition. Determining the genetic basis of signal divergence will help to understand signal evolution by sexual selection and its role in the speciation process. An earlier study investigated QTL for male courtship song carrier frequency in Drosophila montana using microsatellite markers. We refined this study by adding to the linkage map markers for ten candidate genes known to affect song production in...

Data from: Parasitoid wasps influence where aphids die via an inter-specific indirect genetic effect

Mouhammad Shadi Khudr, Johan A. Oldekop, David M. Shuker & Richard F. Preziosi
Host–parasite interactions are a key paradigm for understanding the process of coevolution. Central to coevolution is how genetic variation in interacting species allows parasites to evolve manipulative strategies. However, genetic variation in the parasite may also be associated with host phenotype changes, thereby changing the selection on both species. For instance, parasites often induce changes in the behaviour of their host to maximize their own fitness, yet the quantitative genetic basis for behavioural manipulation has...

Data from: A sex allocation cost to polyandry in a parasitoid wasp

Rebecca A. Boulton & David M. Shuker
The costs and benefits of polyandry are central to understanding the near-ubiquity of female multiple mating. Here, we present evidence of a novel cost of polyandry: disrupted sex allocation. In Nasonia vitripennis, a species that is monandrous in the wild but engages in polyandry under laboratory culture conditions, sexual harassment during oviposition results in increased production of sons under conditions that favour female-biased sex ratios. In addition, females more likely to re-mate under harassment produce...

Data from: Experimental reduction of intromittent organ length reduces male reproductive success in a bug

Liam R. Dougherty, Imran A. Rahman, Emily R. Burdfield-Steel, E. V. Greenway & David M. Shuker
It is now clear in many species that male and female genital evolution has been shaped by sexual selection. However, it has historically been difficult to confirm correlations between morphology and fitness, as genital traits are complex and manipulation tends to impair function significantly. In this study, we investigate the functional morphology of the elongate male intromittent organ (or processus) of the seed bug Lygaeus simulans, in two ways. We first use micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)...

Data from: Cognitive ability is heritable and predicts the success of an alternative mating tactic

Carl Smith, André Phillips & Martin Reichard
The ability to attract mates, acquire resources for reproduction, and successfully outcompete rivals for fertilizations may make demands on cognitive traits—the mechanisms by which an animal acquires, processes, stores and acts upon information from its environment. Consequently, cognitive traits potentially undergo sexual selection in some mating systems. We investigated the role of cognitive traits on the reproductive performance of male rose bitterling (Rhodeus ocellatus), a freshwater fish with a complex mating system and alternative mating...

Data from: Frequency-dependent conspecific attraction to food patches

Guy Beauchamp & Graeme D. Ruxton
In many ecological situations, resources are difficult to find but become more apparent to nearby searchers after one of their numbers discovers and begins to exploit them. If the discoverer cannot monopolize the resources, then others may benefit from joining the discoverer and sharing their discovery. Existing theories for this type of conspecific attraction have often used very simple rules for how the decision to join a discovered resource patch should be influenced by the...

Data from: Direct evidence that density-dependent regulation underpins the temporal stability of abundant species in a diverse animal community

Peter A. Henderson & Anne E. Magurran
To understand how ecosystems are structured and stabilized, and to identify when communities are at risk of damage or collapse, we need to know how the abundances of the taxa in the entire assemblage vary over ecologically meaningful timescales. Here, we present an analysis of species temporal variability within a single large vertebrate community. Using an exceptionally complete 33-year monthly time series following the dynamics of 81 species of fishes, we show that the most...

Data from: Continuous-time spatially explicit capture-recapture models, with an application to a jaguar camera-trap survey.

Rebecca Foster, Bart Harmsen, Lorenzo Milazzo, Greg Distiller & David Borchers
1. Many capture-recapture surveys of wildlife populations operate in continuous time but detections are typically aggregated into occasions for analysis, even when exact detection times are available. This discards information and introduces subjectivity, in the form of decisions about occasion definition. 2. We develop a spatio-temporal Poisson process model for spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) surveys that operate continuously and record exact detection times. We show that, except in some special cases (including the case in...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    21
  • 2021
    24
  • 2020
    28
  • 2019
    17
  • 2018
    31
  • 2017
    31
  • 2016
    38
  • 2015
    30
  • 2014
    24
  • 2013
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    278

Affiliations

  • University of St Andrews
    275
  • University of Cambridge
    14
  • University of Sheffield
    13
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    12
  • University of Edinburgh
    12
  • University of Glasgow
    10
  • Aarhus University
    10
  • University of Exeter
    10
  • University of Jyväskylä
    10
  • University of Aberdeen
    9