7 Works

Data from: An invasive species reverses the roles in a host-parasite relationship between bitterling fish and unionid mussels

Martin Reichard, Milan Vrtilek, Karel Douda & Carl Smith
The impact of multiple invading species can be magnified due to mutual facilitation, termed “invasional meltdown”, but invasive species can also be adversely affected by their interactions with other invaders. Using a unique reciprocal host-parasite relationship between a bitterling fish, Rhodeus amarus, and unionid mussels, we show that an invasive mussel reverses the roles in the relationship. Bitterling lay their eggs into mussel gills, and mussel larvae parasitize fish. Bitterling recently colonized Europe and parasitize...

Data from: Genome sequence of dwarf birch (Betula nana) and cross-species RAD markers

Nian Wang, Marian Thomson, William J. A. Bodles, Robert M. M. Crawford, Harriet V. Hunt, Alan Watson Featherstone, Jaume Pellicer & Richard J. A. Buggs
New sequencing technologies allow development of genome-wide markers for any genus of ecological interest, including plant genera such as Betula (birch) that have previously proved difficult to study due to widespread polyploidy and hybridisation. We present a de novo reference genome sequence assembly, from 67X short read coverage, of Betula nana (dwarf birch) – a diploid that is the keystone woody species of sub-arctic scrub communities but of conservation concern in Britain. We also present...

Data from: Tales of the unexpected: Phylogeography of the arctic-alpine model plant Saxifraga oppositifolia (Saxifragaceae) revisited

Manuela Winkler, Andreas Tribsch, Gerald M. Schneeweiss, Sabine Brodbeck, Felix Gugerli, Rolf Holderegger, Richard J. Abbott & Peter Schönswetter
Arctic-alpine biota occupy enormous areas in the Arctic and the northern hemisphere mountain ranges, and have undergone major range shifts during their comparatively short history. The origins of individual arctic-alpine species remain largely unknown. In the case of the Purple saxifrage, Saxifraga oppositifolia, an important model for arctic-alpine plants, phylogeographic studies have remained inconclusive about early stages of the species’ spatiotemporal diversification, but have provided evidence for long-range colonization out of a presumed Beringian origin...

Data from: Change and stability in a steep morph-frequency cline in the snail Cepaea nemoralis (L.) over 43 years.

Robert A. D. Cameron, Laurence M. Cook & Jeremy J. D. Greenwood
Populations of the polymorphic land snail Cepaea nemoralis (L.) from Deepdale, Derbyshire, UK, sampled in 1965-67, showed a pattern of area effects, with steep clines among groups of populations differing in shell colour and banding morph frequencies. In 2010 most of these populations were resampled. In particular a continuous transect made in 1967 of 42 18.34m x 18.34m quadrats across a steep cline in several morph frequencies was completely resampled. In the dale as a...

Data from: Model-based comparisons of phylogeographic scenarios resolve the intraspecific divergence of cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis

Gilbert Smith, Konrad Lohse, William J. Etges & Michael G. Ritchie
The cactophilic fly Drosophila mojavensis exhibits considerable intraspecific genetic structure across allopatric geographic regions and shows associations with different host cactus species across its range. The divergence between these populations has been studied for more than 60 years, yet their exact historical relationships have not been resolved. We analysed sequence data from 15 intronic X-linked loci across populations from Baja California, mainland Sonora-Arizona and Mojave Desert regions under an isolation-with-migration model to assess multiple scenarios...

Data from: Environmental complexity influences association network structure and network-based diffusion of foraging information in fish shoals

Mike M. Webster, Nicola Atton, William J. E. Hoppitt & Kevin N. Laland
Socially transmitted information can significantly affect the ways in which animals interact with their environments. We used network-based diffusion analysis, a novel and powerful tool for exploring information transmission, to model the rate at which sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) discovered prey patches, comparing shoals foraging in open and structured environments. We found that for groups in the open environment, individuals tended to recruit to both the prey patch and empty comparison patches at similar times, suggesting...

Data from: The evolution of primate general and cultural intelligence

Simon M. Reader, Yfke Hager & Kevin N. Laland
There are consistent individual differences in human intelligence, attributable to a single ‘general intelligence’ factor, g. The evolutionary basis of g and its links to social learning and culture remain controversial. Conflicting hypotheses regard primate cognition as divided into specialized, independently evolving modules versus a single general process. To assess how processes underlying culture relate to one another and other cognitive capacities, we compiled ecologically relevant cognitive measures from multiple domains, namely reported incidences of...

Registration Year

  • 2012
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Affiliations

  • University of St Andrews
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  • University of Cambridge
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  • Royal Botanic Gardens
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  • Queen Mary University of London
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  • University of Manchester
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  • University of Vienna
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  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
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  • University of London
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  • Utrecht University
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