658 Works

Amborella pangenome and supplementary tables v3

Ricky Hu , , , , , , , , &

Reversible diffusion-weighted imaging lesions in acute ischemic stroke: a systematic review

Nandakumar Nagaraja, John Forder, Steven Warach & Jośe Merino
Supplemental data: NNagaraja_12292019_DWI_Reversal_In_AIS_Review_Supplemental_File Supplemental Figure e-1: DWI reversal in acute ischemic stroke Supplemental Table e-1: Search Strategy Supplemental Table e-2: Variables extracted for the review Supplemental Table e-3: Imaging protocols for included studies Supplemental Table e-4: DWIR definitions used in the selected studies Supplemental Table e-5: Imaging characteristics of patients Supplemental Table e-6: QUADAS-2 tool for quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies by evaluating risk of bias and applicability concerns.

Data from: Important airborne lidar metrics of canopy structure for estimating snow interception

Micah Russell, Jan Eitel, Timothy Link & Carlos A. Silva

Data from: Interaction among ploidy, breeding system, and lineage diversification

Rosana Zenil-Ferguson, J. Gordon Burleigh, William A. Freyman, Boris Igic, Itay Mayrose & Emma E. Goldberg
If particular traits consistently affect rates of speciation and extinction, broad macroevolutionary patterns can be interpreted as consequences of selection at high levels of the biological hierarchy. Identifying traits associated with diversification rates is difficult because of the wide variety of characters under consideration and the statistical challenges of testing for associations from comparative phylogenetic data. Ploidy (diploid vs. polyploid states) and breeding system (self-incompatible vs. self-compatible states) are both thought to be drivers of...

Optimizing Coastal Restoration with the Stress Gradient Hypothesis

Hallie S Fischman, Sinead M Crotty & Christine Angelini
Restoration efforts have been escalating worldwide in response to widespread habitat degradation. However, coastal restoration attempts notoriously vary in their ability to establish resilient, high-functioning ecosystems. Conventional restoration attempts disperse transplants in competition-minimizing arrays, yet recent studies suggest that clumping transplants to maximize facilitative interactions may improve restoration success. Here, we modify the Stress Gradient Hypothesis to generate predictions about where each restoration design will perform best across environmental stress gradients. We then test this...

Data from: Preserved collagen reveals species identity in archaeological marine turtle bones from Caribbean and Florida sites

Michael Buckley, Virginia L. Harvey, Michelle J. LeFebvre, Susan D. DeFrance, Casper Toftgaard & Andrew C. Kitchener
Advancements in molecular science are continually improving our understanding of marine turtle biology and evolution. However, there are still considerable gaps in our understanding, such as past marine turtle distributions, which can benefit from advanced zooarchaeological analyses. Here we apply collagen fingerprinting to 130 archaeological marine turtle bone samples up to 2500 years old from the Caribbean and Florida’s Gulf Coast for faunal identification, finding the vast majority of samples (88%) to contain preserved collagen...

Sex affects immunolabeling for histone 3 K27me3 in the trophectoderm of the bovine blastocyst but not labeling for histone 3 K18ac

Peter Hansen, Luciano Carvalheira, Paula Tribulo & Alan Borges
The mammalian embryo displays sexual dimorphism in the preimplantation period. Moreover, competence of the embryo to develop is dependent on the sire from which the embryo is derived and can be modified by embryokines produced by the endometrium such as colony stimulating factor 2 (CSF2). The preimplantation period is characterized by large changes in epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones. It is possible, therefore, that effects of sex, sire, and embryo regulatory molecules are mediated...

Colony-age-dependent variation in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles in subterranean termite colonies

Johnalyn Gordon, Jan Šobotník & Thomas Chouvenc
Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) have, in insects, important physiological and ecological functions, such as protection against desiccation and as semiochemicals in eusocial taxa, including termites. CHCs are, in termites, known to vary qualitatively and/or quantitatively among species, populations, or seasons. Changes to hydrocarbon profile composition have been linked to varying degrees of aggression between termite colonies, although the variability of results among studies suggests that additional factors might have been involved. One source of variability may...

Changes in tree community structures in defaunated forests are not driven only by dispersal limitation

Kirstie Hazelwood, C. E. Timothy Paine, Fernando H. Cornejo-Valverde, Elizabeth G. Pringle, Harald Beck & John Terborgh
1. Bushmeat hunting has reduced population sizes of large frugivorous vertebrates throughout the tropics, thereby reducing the dispersal of seeds. This is believed to affect tree population dynamics, and therefore community composition, because the seed dispersal of large-seeded trees depends upon large-bodied vertebrates. 2. We report on a long-running study of the effect of defaunation on a tropical tree community. In three censuses over 11 years, we compared sapling recruitment between a hunted and a...

Comparative phylogenetics of Papilio butterfly wing shape and size demonstrates independent hindwing and forewing evolution

Hannah Owens, Delano Lewis, Fabien Condamine, Akito Kawahara & Robert Guralnick
The complex forces that shape butterfly wings have long been a subject of experimental and comparative research. Butterflies use their wings for flight, camouflage, mate recognition, warning and mimicry. However, general patterns and correlations among wing shape and size evolution are still poorly understood. We collected geometric morphometric measurements from over 1400 digitized museum specimens of Papilio swallowtails and combined them with phylogenetic data to test two hypotheses: 1) forewing shape and size evolve independently...

Functional trait table for mixed-species flocking birds in the Western Andes of Colombia

Harrison Jones & Scott Robinson
These data represent functional traits relevant to the foraging ecology and habitat preferences of mixed-species flock joining bird species from the Western Andes of Colombia. We collected these data based on published data for the species from the Handbook of the Birds Alive online database (del Hoyo et al. 2020), supplemented with additional natural history references were available, with the objective of calculating the functional richness contained in mixed-species flock compositions sampled across a patch...

Dispersal predicts hybrid zone widths across animal diversity: Implications for species borders under incomplete reproductive isolation

Jay McEntee, J. Gordon Burleigh & Sonal Singhal
Hybrid zones occur as range boundaries for many animal taxa. One model for how hybrid zones form and stabilize is the tension zone model, a version of which predicts that hybrid zone widths are determined by a balance between random dispersal into hybrid zones and selection against hybrids. Here, we examine whether random dispersal and proxies for selection against hybrids (genetic distances between hybridizing pairs) can explain variation in hybrid zone widths across 131 hybridizing...

MHC variation is similar in little brown bats before and after white-nose syndrome outbreak

Xueling Yi, Emily Latch, Deahn Donner, Paula Marquardt, Jonathan Palmer, Michelle Jusino, Jacqueline Frair & Daniel Lindner
White-nose syndrome (WNS), caused by the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), has driven alarming declines in North American hibernating bats, such as little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus). During hibernation, infected little brown bats are able to initiate anti-Pd immune responses, indicating pathogen-mediated selection on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. However, such immune responses may not be protective as they interrupt torpor, elevate energy costs, and potentially lead to higher mortality rates. To assess whether...

Data from: Interaction networks of avian mixed-species flocks along elevation in the tropical Andes

Flavia A. Montaño-Centellas
Ecological communities are comprised of species that interact with each other and those interactions ultimately generate community structure. Network theory provides a useful framework to study communities, by simultaneously considering species composition and the interactions among species. In this study, I use mixed-species flocks as model systems to gain insights on community and network structure. Specifically, I use co-occurrence network analyses to explore if avian mixed-species flocks change in richness and composition and/or in network...

The magnitude of large-scale tree mortality caused by the invasive pathogen Phytophthora ramorum

Richard Cobb, Sarah Haas, Nicholas Kruskamp, Whalen Dillon, Tedmund Swiecki, David Rizzo, Susan Frankel & Ross Meentemeyer
Forest pathogens are important drivers of tree mortality across the globe but it is exceptionally challenging to gather and build unbiased quantitative models of their impacts, which has resulted in few estimates matching the scale of disease. Here we harness the rare dataset matching the spatial scale of pathogen invasion, host, and disease heterogeneity to estimate infection and mortality for the four most susceptible host species of Phytophthora ramorum, an invasive pathogen that drives the...

Generation of a chromosome-scale genome assembly of the insect-repellant terpenoid-producing Lamiaceae species, Callicarpa americana

John P. Hamilton, Grant Godden, Emily Lanier, Wajid Waheed Bhat, Taliesin Kinser, Brieanne Vaillancourt, Haiyan Wang, Joshua Wood, Jiming Jiang, Pamela Soltis, Douglas Soltis, Bjoern Hamberger & C. Robin Buell
Background: Plants exhibit wide chemical diversity due to production of specialized metabolites which function as pollinator attractants, defensive compounds, and signaling molecules. Lamiaceae (mints) are known for their chemodiversity and have been cultivated for use as culinary herbs and as sources of insect repellents, health-promoting compounds, and fragrance. Findings: We report the chromosome-scale genome assembly of Callicarpa americana L. (American beautyberry), a species within the early diverging Callicarpoideae clade of the Lamiaceae, known for its...

Vector bionomics and vectorial capacity as emergent properties of mosquito behaviors and ecology

Sean Wu, Penny Hancock, Arnaud Le Menach, Tanya Russell, Thomas Burkot, , Derek Cummings, Kelly Compton, Daniel Citron, John Marshall, Biyonka Liang, Catherine Moyes, Qian Zhang, David Smith, Samson Kiware, Anne Wilson, Thomas Scott, John Henry, Steven Lindsay, Amit Verma & Hector Sanchez C.
Mosquitoes are important vectors for pathogens that infect humans and other vertebrate animals. Some aspects of adult mosquito behavior and mosquito ecology play an important role in determining the capacity of vector populations to transmit pathogens. Here, we re-examine factors affecting the transmission of pathogens by mosquitoes using a new approach. Unlike most previous models, this framework considers the behavioral states and state transitions of adult mosquitoes through a sequence of activity bouts. We developed...

Data from: Leaf-footed bugs possess multiple hidden contrasting color signals, but only one is associated with increased body size

Zachary Emberts, Christine Miller, Chelsea Skojec, Rachel Shepherd & Colette St. Mary
Anti-predatory displays that incorporate hidden contrasting coloration are found in a variety of different animals. These displays are seen in organisms that have drab coloration at rest, but when disturbed reveal conspicuous coloration. Examples include the bright abdomens of mountain katydids and the colorful underwings of hawk moths. Such hidden displays can function as secondary defenses, enabling evasion of a pursuant predator. To begin to understand why some species have these displays while others do...

Evolution of body size and wing shape trade-offs in arsenurine silkmoths

Chris Hamilton, Nathalie Winiger, Juliette Rubin, Jesse Breinholt, Rodolphe Rougerie, Ian Kitching, Jesse Barber & Akito Kawahara
One of the key objectives in biological research is understanding how evolutionary processes have produced Earth's diversity. A critical step towards revealing these processes is an investigation of evolutionary tradeoffs – that is, the opposing pressures of multiple selective forces. For millennia, nocturnal moths have had to balance successful flight, as they search for mates or host plants, with evading bat predators. However, the potential for evolutionary trade-offs between wing shape and body size are...

Altered Gut Microbiome Profile in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Seungbum Kim
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is considered a disease of the pulmonary vasculature. Limited progress has been made in preventing or arresting progression of PAH despite extensive efforts. Our previous studies indicated that PAH could be considered a systemic disease since its pathology involves interplay of multiple organs. This, coupled with increasing implication of the gut and its microbiome in chronic diseases, led us to hypothesize that PAH patients exhibit a distinct gut microbiome that contributes...

Information on marine management policies for invasive lionfish in the Western Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea

Allison C. Candelmo, Aylin Ulman, Fadilah Z. Ali, Stephen R. Gittings, Summer R. Huber, Lauryn E. Magno, Kaylin R. Clements, Burak Ali Çiçek, Jennifer K. Chapman, Fabian C. Kyne, Michel Bariche, Kimani Kitson-Walters, Francesco Tiralongo, Demetris Kletou, Taner Yildiz, Nir Stern, Sara A.A. Al Mabruk, Mohammed Adel, Nejmeddine Bradai, Shevy B.S. Rothman, Vasileios Minasidis, Stephanie J. Green, Jennifer N. Solomon, Holden E. Harris, Philip E. Karp … & James V Hart
The invasion of lionfish (Pterois volitans and P. miles) in the Western Atlantic is perhaps the best studied marine fish invasion to date; meanwhile another lionfish invasion is rapidly evolving in the Mediterranean. We reviewed lionfish management policies from several decades in the Western Atlantic to suggest policy recommendations for the Mediterranean. These strategic recommendations are synthesized in our corresponding manuscript titled: “Lessons from the Western Atlantic lionfish invasion can inform policy and management strategies...

Data from: Implementation of a pediatric telemedicine and medication delivery service in a resource-limited setting: A pilot study for clinical safety and feasibility

Molly B. Klarman, Katelyn E. Flaherty, Xiaofei Chi, Youseline Cajsuma, Anne Carine Capois, Michel Daryl Vladimir Dofiné, Lerby Exantus, Jason Friesen, Valery M Beau De Rochars, Chantale Baril, Matthew J. Gurka, Torben K. Becker & Eric J. Nelson
Objective: Determine the clinical safety and feasibility of implementing a telemedicine and medication delivery service (TMDS) to address gaps in nighttime healthcare access for children in low-resource settings. Results: A total of 391 cases were enrolled from September 9th, 2019 to January 19th, 2021; 89% (347) received a household visit. Most cases were triaged as mild or moderate (92%; 361). Among the severe cases, 83% (20) sought subsequent referred care. The most common complaint was...

Data from: A millennium of climatic and floristic dynamics in the Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes

Alex Correa, Jaime Escobar, Broxton Bird, Dayenari Caballero-Rodríguez, Byron Steinman, Paula A. Rodríguez-Zorro & Jason Curtis
The transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, 950-1250 CE) to the Little Ice Age (LIA, 1350 to 1800 CE) is the largest pre-industrial climate shift within the last two millennia, offering an opportunity to study how vegetation responds to rapid climate change. We analyzed a sedimentary record from the Colombian Andes to reconstruct regional vegetation dynamics during this time interval, identify the modern environmental distribution of taxa present in the fossil record, and provide...

Data and code from: Invasive grass indirectly alters seasonal patterns in seed predation

Jesse Borden, Kelly M. San Antonio, Giovanna Tomat-Kelly, Taylor Clark & S. Luke Flory
Invasive species threaten ecosystems globally, but their impacts can be cryptic when they occur indirectly. Invader phenology can also differ from that of native species, potentially causing seasonality in invader impacts. Yet, it is unclear if invader phenology can drive seasonal patterns in indirect effects. We used a field experiment to test if an invasive grass (Imperata cylindrica) caused seasonal indirect effects by altering rodent foraging and seed predation patterns through time. Using seeds from...

Data from: Tropical bird species have less variable body sizes

Quentin D. Read, Benjamin Baiser, John M. Grady, Phoebe L. Zarnetske, Sydne Record & Jonathan Belmaker
Ecologists have often predicted that species’ niche breadths should decline toward the equator. Dan Janzen arrived at this prediction based on climatic constraints, while Robert MacArthur argued that a latitudinal gradient in resource specialization drives the pattern. This idea has some support when it comes to thermal niches, but has rarely been explored for other niche dimensions. Body size is linked to niche dimensions related to diet, competition, and environmental tolerance in vertebrates. We identified...

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