632 Works

Amborella pangenome and supplementary tables v3

Ricky Hu , , , , , , , , &

Reversible diffusion-weighted imaging lesions in acute ischemic stroke: a systematic review

Nandakumar Nagaraja, John Forder, Steven Warach & Jośe Merino
Supplemental data: NNagaraja_12292019_DWI_Reversal_In_AIS_Review_Supplemental_File Supplemental Figure e-1: DWI reversal in acute ischemic stroke Supplemental Table e-1: Search Strategy Supplemental Table e-2: Variables extracted for the review Supplemental Table e-3: Imaging protocols for included studies Supplemental Table e-4: DWIR definitions used in the selected studies Supplemental Table e-5: Imaging characteristics of patients Supplemental Table e-6: QUADAS-2 tool for quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies by evaluating risk of bias and applicability concerns.

Data from: Important airborne lidar metrics of canopy structure for estimating snow interception

Micah Russell, Jan Eitel, Timothy Link & Carlos A. Silva

Data from: Population genomics and morphometric assignment of western honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in the Republic of South Africa

Amin Eimanifar, Samantha A. Brooks, Tomas Bustamante & James D. Ellis
Backgrounds: Apis mellifera scutellata and A.m. capensis (the Cape honey bee) are western honey bee subspecies indigenous to the Republic of South Africa (RSA). Both bees are important for biological and economic reasons. First, A.m. scutellata is the invasive "African honey bee" of the Americas and exhibits a number of traits that beekeepers consider undesirable. They swarm excessively, are prone to absconding (vacating the nest entirely), usurp other honey bee colonies, and exhibit heightened defensiveness....

Data from: Unmanned aerial systems measure structural habitat features for wildlife across multiple scales

Peter J. Olsoy, Lisa A. Shipley, Janet L. Rachlow, Jennifer S. Forbey, Nancy F. Glenn, Matthew A. Burgess & Daniel H. Thornton
1.Assessing habitat quality is a primary goal of ecologists. However, evaluating habitat features that relate strongly to habitat quality at fine-scale resolutions across broad-scale extents is challenging. Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) provide an avenue for bridging the gap between relatively high spatial resolution, low spatial extent field-based habitat quality measurements and lower spatial resolution, higher spatial extent satellite-based remote sensing. Our goal in this study was to evaluate the potential for UAS structure from motion...

Data from: Community phylogeny of the globally critically imperiled pine rockland ecosystem

Lauren B. Trotta, Benjamin Baiser, Jennifer Possley, Daijiang Li, James Lange, Sarah Martin & Emily B. Sessa
Premise of the study: Community phylogenetic methods incorporate information on evolutionary relationships into studies of organismal assemblages. We used a community phylogenetic framework to investigate relationships and biogeographic affinities and calculate phylogenetic signal of endemism and invasiveness for the flora of the pine rocklands, a globally critically imperiled ecosystem with a significant portion of its distribution in South Florida, United States. Methods: We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships of 538 vascular plant taxa, which represents 92.28% of...

Data from: Snail herbivory affects seedling establishment in a temperate forest in the Ozark region

Anna J. Liang, Claudia Stein, Eleanor Pearson, Jonathan A. Myers, Raelene M. Crandall & Scott A. Mangan
1. Species-specific herbivores are hypothesized to maintain plant diversity by preventing the dominance of any one plant species. However, a large proportion of herbivores have wide host ranges, and these generalists could have similar effects on plant community composition if they exhibit differences in their host preference. Here, we coupled lab and field experiments to test whether a common forest-understory snail (Neohelix alleni), a generalist herbivore, has the potential to influence forest composition through differential...

Data from: A new ancient lineage of frog (Anura: Nyctibatrachidae: Astrobatrachinae subfam. nov.) endemic to the Western Ghats of Peninsular India

Seenapuram Palaniswamy Vijayakumar, Robert Alexander Pyron, K. P. Dinesh, Varun R. Torsekar, Achyuthan N. Srikanthan, Priyanka Swamy, Edward L. Stanley, David C. Blackburn & Kartik Shanker
The Western Ghats (WG) is an escarpment on the west coast of Peninsular India, housing one of the richest assemblages of frogs in the world, with three endemic families. Here, we report the discovery of a new ancient lineage from a high-elevation massif in the Wayanad Plateau of the southern WG. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the lineage belongs to Natatanura and clusters with Nyctibatrachidae, a family endemic to the WG/Sri Lanka biodiversity hotspot. Based on...

Data from: Evaluation and comparison of classical interatomic potentials through a user-friendly interactive web-interface

Kamal Choudhary, Faical Yannick P. Congo, Tao Liang, Chandler Becker, Richard G. Hennig & Francesca Tavazza
Classical empirical potentials/force-fields (FF) provide atomistic insights into material phenomena through molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Despite their wide applicability, a systematic evaluation of materials properties using such potentials and, especially, an easy-to-use user-interface for their comparison is still lacking. To address this deficiency, we computed energetics and elastic properties of variety of materials such as metals and ceramics using a wide range of empirical potentials and compared them to density functional theory (DFT)...

Data from: A molecular phylogeny and revised higher-level classification for the leaf-mining moth family Gracillariidae and its implications for larval host-use evolution

Akito Y. Kawahara, David Plotkin, Issei Ohshima, Carlos Lopez-Vaamonde, Peter R. Houlihan, Jesse W. Breinholt, Atsushi Kawakita, Lei Xiao, Jerome C. Regier, Donald R. Davis, Tosio Kumata, Jay-Cheon Sohn, Jurate De Prins, Charles Mitter & JAE-CHEON SOHN
Gracillariidae are one of the most diverse families of internally feeding insects, and many species are economically important. Study of this family has been hampered by lack of a robust and comprehensive phylogeny. In the present paper, we sequenced up to 22 genes in 96 gracillariid species, representing all previously recognized subfamilies and genus groups, plus 20 outgroups representing other families and superfamilies. Following objective identification and removal of two rogue taxa, two datasets were...

Data from: Oxidative stress-mediated NFκB phosphorylation upregulates p62/SQSTM1 and promotes retinal pigmented epithelial cell survival through increased autophagy

Chunjuan Song, Sayak K. Mitter, Xiaoping Qi, Eleni Beli, Haripriya V. Rao, Jindong Ding, Colin S. Ip, Hongmei Gu, Debra Akin, William A. Dunn, Catherine Bowes Rickman, Alfred S. Lewin, Maria B. Grant & Michael E. Boulton
p62 is a scaffolding adaptor implicated in the clearance of protein aggregates by autophagy. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can either stimulate or inhibit NFκB-mediated gene expression influencing cellular fate. We studied the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated oxidative stress and NFκB signaling on p62 expression in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and investigated its role in regulation of autophagy and RPE survival against oxidative damage. Cultured human RPE cell line ARPE-19 and primary human adult...

Data from: Horses in the Cloud: big data exploration and mining of fossil and extant Equus (Mammalia: Equidae)

Bruce J. MacFadden & Robert P. Guralnick
Extant species of the genus Equus (e.g., horses, asses, and zebras) have a widespread distribution today on all continents except Antarctica. Extinct species of Equus represented by fossils were likewise widely distributed in the Pliocene and even more so during the Pleistocene. In order to understand the efficacy of “big data” for (paleo)biogeographic analyses, location records (latitude, longitude) and fossil occurrences for the genus Equus were mined and further explored from six databases, including iDigBio,...

Data from: Automated identification of insect vectors of Chagas disease in Brazil and Mexico: the Virtual Vector Lab

Rodrigo Gurgel-Gonçalves, Ed Komp, Lindsay P. Campbell, Ali Khalighifar, Jarrett Mellenbruch, Vagner José Mendonça, Hannah L. Owens, Keynes De La Cruz Felix, A. Townsend Peterson & Janine M. Ramsey
Identification of arthropods important in disease transmission is a crucial, yet difficult, task that can demand considerable training and experience. An important case in point is that of the 150+ species of Triatominae, vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease across the Americas. We present a fully automated system that is able to identify triatomine bugs from Mexico and Brazil with an accuracy consistently above 80%, and with considerable potential for further improvement....

Data from: Patterns of reproductive isolation in Nolana (Chilean Bellflower)

Cathleen Jewell, Amy Douglas Papineau, Rosanna Freyre & Leonie Clare Moyle
We examined reproductive isolating barriers at four postmating stages among 11 species from the morphologically diverse genus Nolana (Solanaceae). At least one stage was positively correlated with both genetic and geographic distance between species. Postzygotic isolation was generally stronger and faster evolving than postmating prezygotic isolation. In addition, there was no evidence for mechanical isolation or for reproductive character displacement in floral traits that can influence pollinator isolation. In general, among the potential isolating stages...

Data from: The Achilles' heel hypothesis: misinformed keystone individuals impair collective learning and reduce group success

Jonathan Pruitt, Colin Wright, Carl Keiser, Alexander DeMarco, Matt Grobis, Noa Pinter-Wollman, Matthew M. Grobis, Alex E. DeMarco, Carl N. Keiser, Jonathan N. Pruitt & Colin M. Wright
Many animal societies rely on highly influential keystone individuals for proper functioning. When information quality is important for group success, such keystone individuals have the potential to diminish group performance if they possess inaccurate information. Here we test whether information quality (accurate or inaccurate) influences collective outcomes when keystone individuals are the first to acquire it. We trained keystone or generic individuals to attack or avoid novel stimuli and implanted these seed individuals within groups...

Data from: Distance-decay differs among vertical strata in a tropical rainforest

Edmund W. Basham, Christa M. Seidl, Lydou R. Andriamahohatra, Brunno F. Oliveira & Brett R. Scheffers
1. Assemblage similarity decays with geographic distance—a pattern known as the distance-decay relationship. While this pattern has been investigated for a wide range of organisms, ecosystems, and geographical gradients, whether these changes vary more cryptically across different forest strata (from ground to canopy) remains elusive. 2. Here, we investigated the influence of ground vs arboreal assemblages to the general distance-decay relationship observed in forests. We seek to explain differences in distance-decay relationships between strata in...

Data from: A comprehensive and dated phylogenomic analysis of butterflies

Marianne Espeland, Jesse W. Breinholt, Keith R. Willmott, Andrew D. Warren, Roger Vila, Emmanuel F. A. Toussaint, Sarah C. Maunsell, Kwaku Aduse-Poku, Gerard Talavera, Rodney Eastwood, Marta A. Jarzyna, Robert Guralnick, David J. Lohman, Naomi E. Pierce, Akito Y. Kawahara, Jesse Breinholt & Emmanuel F.A. Toussaint
Butterflies (Papilionoidea), with over 18,000 described species [1], have captivated naturalists and scientists for centuries. They play a central role in the study of speciation, community ecology, biogeography, climate change, and plant-insect interactions and include many model organisms and pest species [2, 3]. However, a robust higher-level phylogenetic framework is lacking. To fill this gap, we inferred a dated phylogeny by analyzing the first phylogenomic dataset, including 352 loci (> 150,000 bp) from 207 species...

Data from: Divergent melanism strategies in Andean butterfly communities structure diversity patterns and climate responses

Pauline C. Dufour, Keith R. Willmott, Pablo S. Padrón, Shuang Xing, Timothy C. Bonebrake & Brett R. Scheffers
Aim: Geographic distributions are driven by a combination of species sensitivity and exposure to climate. We quantified colour lightness, a trait that mediates the interaction between sensitivity and exposure, of diverse butterfly communities to test whether colour lightness is associated with community assembly across climate-elevation gradients. Location: Ecuadorian Andes Methods: We used a long-term dataset of museum specimens for two of the most speciose genera of Pieridae butterflies in Ecuador, Catasticta and Leptophobia. Within a...

Data from: Effects of reduced-impact selective logging on palm regeneration in Belize

Boris Arevalo, Jair Valladarez, Shahira Muschamp, Elma Kay, Alex Finkral, Anand Roopsind & Francis E. Putz
To assess the impacts of a low-intensity selective timber harvest on a palm community in Belize, we mapped logging infrastructure (i.e., roads, log landings, skid trails, and stumps) and measured palm regeneration 1 year after a timber harvest carried out using reduced-impact logging (RIL) practices. We sampled palms across a gradient of increasing harvest impact severity from areas not directly affected by logging, in felling gaps, on secondary and primary skid trails, and on log...

Data from: Grazing enhances belowground carbon allocation, microbial biomass, and soil carbon in a subtropical grassland

Chris H. Wilson, Michael S. Strickland, Jack A. Hutchings, Thomas S. Bianchi & S. Luke Flory
Despite the large contribution of rangeland and pasture to global soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks, there is considerable uncertainty about the impact of large herbivore grazing on SOC, especially for understudied subtropical grazing lands. It is well known that root system inputs are the source of most grassland SOC, but the impact of grazing on partitioning of carbon allocation to root tissue production compared to fine root exudation is unclear. Given that different forms of...

Data from: Machine learning for characterization of insect vector feeding

Denis S. Willett, Justin George, Nora S. Willett, Lukasz L. Stelinski & Stephen L. Lapointe
Insects that feed by ingesting plant and animal fluids cause devastating damage to humans, livestock, and agriculture worldwide, primarily by transmitting pathogens of plants and animals. The feeding processes required for successful pathogen transmission by sucking insects can be recorded by monitoring voltage changes across an insect-food source feeding circuit. The output from such monitoring has traditionally been examined manually, a slow and onerous process. We taught a computer program to automatically classify previously described...

Data from: Transcriptome modulation during host shift is driven by secondary metabolites in desert Drosophila

Diego N. De Panis, Julián Padró, Pedro Furió-Tarí, Sonia Tarazona, Pablo S. Milla Carmona, Ignacio M. Soto, Hernán Dopazo, Ana Conesa & Esteban Hasson
High-throughput transcriptome studies are breaking new ground to investigate the responses that organisms deploy in alternative environments. Nevertheless, much remains to be understood about the genetic basis of host plant adaptation. Here, we investigate genome-wide expression in the fly Drosophila buzzatii raised in different conditions. This species uses decaying tissues of cactus of the genus Opuntia as primary rearing substrate and secondarily, the necrotic tissues of the columnar cactus Trichocereus terscheckii. The latter constitutes a...

Data from: Cold adaptation shapes the robustness of metabolic networks in Drosophila melanogaster.

Caroline Margaret Williams, Miki Watanabe, Mario R. Guarracino, Maria Brigida Ferraro, Arthur S. Edison, Theodore J. Morgan, Arezue F. B. Boroujerdi, Dan A. Hahn & Daniel A. Hahn
When ectotherms are exposed to low temperatures, they enter a cold-induced coma (chill coma) that prevents resource acquisition, mating, oviposition, and escape from predation. There is substantial variation in time taken to recover from chill coma both within and among species, and this variation is correlated with habitat temperatures such that insects from cold environments recover more quickly. This suggests an adaptive response, but the mechanisms underlying variation in recovery times are unknown, making it...

Data from: Simulated hatching failure predicts female plasticity in extra-pair behavior over successive broods

Teru Yuta, Daisuke Nomi, Malika Ihle & Itsuro Koizumi
While many studies have investigated the occurrence of extra-pair paternity (EPP) and its adaptive significance in wild population of birds, we still know surprising little about the plasticity in mating behavior of females at the individual level and how it affects the patterns of paternity. To address this question, we focused on the direct fertility benefit hypothesis for the function of EPP and studied if female birds react in extra-pair mating behavior after reproductive failures...

Data from: Immunoglobulin detection in wild birds: effectiveness of three secondary anti-avian IgY antibodies in direct ELISAs in 41 avian species

Carol A. Fassbinder-Orth, Travis E. Wilcoxen, Tiffany Tran, Raoul K. Boughton, Jeanne M. Fair, Erik K. Hofmeister, Jennifer L. Grindstaff & Jen C. Owen
1.Immunological reagents for wild, non-model species are limited or often non-existent for many species. 2. In this study, we compare the reactivity of a new anti-passerine IgY secondary antibody with existing secondary antibodies developed for use with birds. Samples from 41 species from the following six avian orders were analysed: Anseriformes (1 family, 1 species), Columbiformes (1 family, 2 species), Galliformes (1 family, 1 species), Passeriformes (16 families, 34 species), Piciformes (1 family, 2 species)...

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