14 Works

Data from: The geographical and institutional distribution of ecological research in the tropics

Gabriela Stocks, Lisa Seales, Franklin Paniagua, Erin Maehr & Emilio M. Bruna
We reviewed 1333 papers published in Biotropica and the Journal of Tropical Ecology from 1995 to 2004. Only 62 percent of tropical countries were represented in our survey, with 62 percent of the publications based on research conducted in only ten countries. Sixty-two percent of papers had lead authors that were based at institutions outside the country where the research was conducted. Cross-national collaboration was limited, accounting for only 28 percent of papers with multiple...

Data from: Splitting an ancient icon: mummy DNA resurrects a cryptic Nile crocodile

Evon Hekkala, Matthew H. Shirley, George Amato, James D. Austin, Suellen Charter, John Thorbjarnarson, Kent A. Vliet, Marlys L. Houck, Robert DeSalle & Michael J. Blum
The Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) is an ancient icon of both cultural and scientific interest. The species is emblematic of the great civilizations of the Nile River valley and serves as a model for international wildlife conservation. Despite its familiarity, a centuries-long dispute over the taxonomic status of the Nile crocodile remains unresolved. This dispute not only confounds our understanding of the origins and biogeography of the “true crocodiles” of the crown genus Crocodylus, but...

Data from: Edge effects on growth and biomass partitioning of an Amazonian understory herb (Heliconia acuminata; Heliconiaceae)

Emilio M. Bruna & Ana Segalin De Andrade
PREMISE: After deforestation, environmental changes in the remaining forest fragments are often most intense near the forest edge, but few studies have evaluated plant growth or plasticity of plant growth in response to edge effects. METHODS: In a 2-year common garden experiment, we compared biomass allocation and growth of Heliconia acuminata with identical genotypes grown in 50 × 35 m common gardens on a 25-year-old edge and in a forest interior site. KEY RESULTS: Genetically...

Data from: Tropical nematode diversity: vertical stratification of nematode communities in a Costa Rican humid lowland rainforest

Thomas O. Powers, Deborah A. Neher, Peter Mullin, Alejandro Esquivel, Robin M. Giblin-Davis, Natsumi Kanzaki, Patricia P. Stock, Morielos M. Mora & Lorena Uribe-Lorio
Comparisons of nematode communities among ecosystems have indicated that, unlike many organisms, nematode communities have less diversity in the tropics than in temperate ecosystems. There are, however, few studies of tropical nematode diversity on which to base conclusions of global patterns of diversity. This study reports an attempt to estimate nematode diversity in the lowland tropical rainforest of La Selva Biological Research Station in Costa Rica. We suggest that one reason previous estimates of tropical...

Data from: Asymmetric dispersal and colonization success of Amazonian plant-ants queens

Emilio M. Bruna, Thiago J. Izzo, Brian D. Inouye, Maria Uriarte & Heraldo L. Vasconcelos
Background: The dispersal ability of queens is central to understanding ant life-history evolution, and plays a fundamental role in ant population and community dynamics, the maintenance of genetic diversity, and the spread of invasive ants. In tropical ecosystems, species from over 40 genera of ants establish colonies in the stems, hollow thorns, or leaf pouches of specialized plants. However, little is known about the relative dispersal ability of queens competing for access to the same...

Data from: New species of Arthroleptis (Anura: Arthroleptidae) from Ngozi Crater in the Poroto Mountains of southwestern Tanzania

David C. Blackburn
A new species of squeaker frog (Arthroleptis) is described from Ngozi Crater in the Poroto Mountains of southwestern Tanzania. The holotype, and only specimen, was collected 80 years ago but remained undescribed because of past taxonomic confusion relating to large-bodied species of Arthroleptis from eastern Africa. Morphological study, including multivariate analysis of measurement data, indicates that this new species is distinguishable from other species of Arthroleptis, including large-bodied species such as Arthroleptis adolfifriederici, Arthroleptis affinis,...

Data from: Ancestral polyploidy in seed plants and angiosperms

Yuannian Jiao, Norman J. Wickett, Ayyampalayam Saravanaraj, André S. Chanderbali, Lena Landherr, Paula E. Ralph, Lynn P. Tomsho, Yi Hu, Haiying Liang, Pamela S. Sotis, Douglas E. Soltis, Sandra W. Clifton, Scott E. Schlarbaum, Stephan C. Schuster, Hong Ma, Jim Leebens-Mack & Claude W. DePamphilis
Whole-genome duplication (WGD), or polyploidy, followed by gene loss and diploidization has long been recognized as an important evolutionary force in animals, fungi and other organisms1, 2, 3, especially plants. The success of angiosperms has been attributed, in part, to innovations associated with gene or whole-genome duplications4, 5, 6, but evidence for proposed ancient genome duplications pre-dating the divergence of monocots and eudicots remains equivocal in analyses of conserved gene order. Here we use comprehensive...

Data from: Ancestral polyploidy in seed plants and angiosperms

Yuannian Jiao, Norman J. Wickett, Ayyampalayam Saravanaraj, André S. Chanderbali, Lena Landherr, Paula E. Ralph, Lynn P. Tomsho, Yi Hu, Haiying Liang, Pamela S. Sotis, Douglas E. Soltis, Sandra W. Clifton, Scott E. Schlarbaum, Stephan C. Schuster, Hong Ma, Jim Leebens-Mack & Claude W. DePamphilis
Whole-genome duplication (WGD), or polyploidy, followed by gene loss and diploidization has long been recognized as an important evolutionary force in animals, fungi and other organisms1, 2, 3, especially plants. The success of angiosperms has been attributed, in part, to innovations associated with gene or whole-genome duplications4, 5, 6, but evidence for proposed ancient genome duplications pre-dating the divergence of monocots and eudicots remains equivocal in analyses of conserved gene order. Here we use comprehensive...

Data from: The geographical and institutional distribution of ecological research in the tropics

Gabriela Stocks, Lisa Seales, Franklin Paniagua, Erin Maehr & Emilio M. Bruna
We reviewed 1333 papers published in Biotropica and the Journal of Tropical Ecology from 1995 to 2004. Only 62 percent of tropical countries were represented in our survey, with 62 percent of the publications based on research conducted in only ten countries. Sixty-two percent of papers had lead authors that were based at institutions outside the country where the research was conducted. Cross-national collaboration was limited, accounting for only 28 percent of papers with multiple...

Data from: Splitting an ancient icon: mummy DNA resurrects a cryptic Nile crocodile

Evon Hekkala, Matthew H. Shirley, George Amato, James D. Austin, Suellen Charter, John Thorbjarnarson, Kent A. Vliet, Marlys L. Houck, Robert DeSalle & Michael J. Blum
The Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) is an ancient icon of both cultural and scientific interest. The species is emblematic of the great civilizations of the Nile River valley and serves as a model for international wildlife conservation. Despite its familiarity, a centuries-long dispute over the taxonomic status of the Nile crocodile remains unresolved. This dispute not only confounds our understanding of the origins and biogeography of the “true crocodiles” of the crown genus Crocodylus, but...

Data from: Edge effects on growth and biomass partitioning of an Amazonian understory herb (Heliconia acuminata; Heliconiaceae)

Emilio M. Bruna, Ana Segalin De Andrade & Ana Segalin De Andrade
PREMISE: After deforestation, environmental changes in the remaining forest fragments are often most intense near the forest edge, but few studies have evaluated plant growth or plasticity of plant growth in response to edge effects. METHODS: In a 2-year common garden experiment, we compared biomass allocation and growth of Heliconia acuminata with identical genotypes grown in 50 × 35 m common gardens on a 25-year-old edge and in a forest interior site. KEY RESULTS: Genetically...

Data from: Asymmetric dispersal and colonization success of Amazonian plant-ants queens

Emilio M. Bruna, Thiago J. Izzo, Brian D. Inouye, Maria Uriarte & Heraldo L. Vasconcelos
Background: The dispersal ability of queens is central to understanding ant life-history evolution, and plays a fundamental role in ant population and community dynamics, the maintenance of genetic diversity, and the spread of invasive ants. In tropical ecosystems, species from over 40 genera of ants establish colonies in the stems, hollow thorns, or leaf pouches of specialized plants. However, little is known about the relative dispersal ability of queens competing for access to the same...

Data from: New species of Arthroleptis (Anura: Arthroleptidae) from Ngozi Crater in the Poroto Mountains of southwestern Tanzania

David C. Blackburn
A new species of squeaker frog (Arthroleptis) is described from Ngozi Crater in the Poroto Mountains of southwestern Tanzania. The holotype, and only specimen, was collected 80 years ago but remained undescribed because of past taxonomic confusion relating to large-bodied species of Arthroleptis from eastern Africa. Morphological study, including multivariate analysis of measurement data, indicates that this new species is distinguishable from other species of Arthroleptis, including large-bodied species such as Arthroleptis adolfifriederici, Arthroleptis affinis,...

Data from: Tropical nematode diversity: vertical stratification of nematode communities in a Costa Rican humid lowland rainforest

Thomas O. Powers, Deborah A. Neher, Peter Mullin, Alejandro Esquivel, Robin M. Giblin-Davis, Natsumi Kanzaki, Patricia P. Stock, Morielos M. Mora & Lorena Uribe-Lorio
Comparisons of nematode communities among ecosystems have indicated that, unlike many organisms, nematode communities have less diversity in the tropics than in temperate ecosystems. There are, however, few studies of tropical nematode diversity on which to base conclusions of global patterns of diversity. This study reports an attempt to estimate nematode diversity in the lowland tropical rainforest of La Selva Biological Research Station in Costa Rica. We suggest that one reason previous estimates of tropical...

Registration Year

  • 2011
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of Florida
    14
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    4
  • Columbia University
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso
    2
  • Washington University in St. Louis
    2
  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    2
  • Florida Museum of Natural History
    2
  • University of Costa Rica
    2
  • Clemson University
    2