37 Works

Data from: The emergence of the lobsters: phylogenetic relationships, morphological evolution and divergence time comparisons of an ancient group (Decapoda: Achelata, Astacidea, Glypheidea, Polychelida)

Heather D. Bracken-Grissom, Shane T. Ahyong, Richard D. Wilkinson, Rodney M. Felmann, Carrie E. Schweitzer, Jesse W. Breinholt, Matthew Bendall, Ferran Palero, Tin-Yam Chan, Darryl L. Felder, Rafael Robles, Ka-Hou Chu, Ling-Ming Tsang, Dohyup Kim, Joel W. Martin, Keith A. Crandall & Rodney M. Feldmann
Lobsters are a ubiquitous and economically important group of decapod crustaceans that includes the infraorders Polychelida, Glypheidea, Astacidea and Achelata. They include familiar forms such as the spiny, slipper, clawed lobsters and crayfish and unfamiliar forms such as the deep-sea and “living fossil” species. The high degree of morphological diversity among these infraorders has led to a dynamic classification and conflicting hypotheses of evolutionary relationships. In this study, we estimated phylogenetic relationships amongst the major...

Data from: The trouble with triplets in biodiversity informatics: a data-driven case against current identifier practices

Robert Guralnick, Tom Conlin, John Deck, Brian Stucky, Nico Cellinese & Brian J. Stucky
The biodiversity informatics community has discussed aspirations and approaches for assigning globally unique identifiers (GUIDs) to biocollections for nearly a decade. During that time, and despite misgivings, the de facto standard identifier has become the “Darwin Core Triplet”, which is a concatenation of values for institution code, collection code, and catalog number associated with biocollections material. Our aim is not to rehash the challenging discussions regarding which GUID system in theory best supports the biodiversity...

Data from: Phylogenomics provides strong evidence for the relationships of butterflies and moths

Akito Y. Kawahara & Jesse W. Breinholt
Butterflies and moths constitute some of the most popular and charismatic insects. Lepidoptera include approximately 160 000 described species, many of which are important model organisms. Previous studies on the evolution of Lepidoptera did not confidently place butterflies, and many relationships among superfamilies in the megadiverse clade Ditrysia remain largely uncertain. We generated a molecular dataset with 46 taxa, combining 33 new transcriptomes with 13 available genomes, transcriptomes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Using HaMStR...

Data from: Cold adaptation shapes the robustness of metabolic networks in Drosophila melanogaster.

Caroline Margaret Williams, Miki Watanabe, Mario R. Guarracino, Maria Brigida Ferraro, Arthur S. Edison, Theodore J. Morgan, Arezue F. B. Boroujerdi, Dan A. Hahn & Daniel A. Hahn
When ectotherms are exposed to low temperatures, they enter a cold-induced coma (chill coma) that prevents resource acquisition, mating, oviposition, and escape from predation. There is substantial variation in time taken to recover from chill coma both within and among species, and this variation is correlated with habitat temperatures such that insects from cold environments recover more quickly. This suggests an adaptive response, but the mechanisms underlying variation in recovery times are unknown, making it...

Data from: A molecular phylogeny of Eumorpha (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) and the evolution of anti-predator larval eyespots

Francesca V. Ponce, Jesse W. Breinholt, Thomas Hossie, Jesse R. Barber, Daniel H. Janzen, Winnie Hallwachs & Akito Y. Kawahara
Many insects possess conspicuous external circular ring markings that resemble the eye of a vertebrate. These ‘eyespots’ typically function to startle or otherwise deter predators, but few studies have examined how eyespots have evolved. We study the evolution of the posterior larval eyespot in the charismatic New World hawkmoth genus Eumorpha. While Eumorpha has a range of posterior larval eyespot shapes and sizes, little is known of how this trait has evolved because phylogenetic relationships...

Data from: Mutualism between co-introduced species facilitates invasion and alters plant community structure

Kirsten M. Prior, Jennifer M. Robinson, Shannon A. Meadley Dunphy & Megan E. Frederickson
Generalized mutualisms are often predicted to be resilient to changes in partner identity. Variation in mutualism-related traits between native and invasive species however, can exacerbate the spread of invasive species (‘invasional meltdown’) if invasive partners strongly interact. Here we show how invasion by a seed-dispersing ant (Myrmica rubra) promotes recruitment of a co-introduced invasive over native ant-dispersed (myrmecochorous) plants. We created experimental communities of invasive (M. rubra) or native ants (Aphaenogaster rudis) and invasive and...

Data from: Urbanized landscapes favored by fig-eating birds increase invasive but not native juvenile strangler fig abundance

Trevor Caughlin, Jessica H. Wheeler, Jill Jankowski & Jeremy W. Lichstein
Propagule pressure can determine the success or failure of invasive plant range expansion. Range expansion takes place at large spatial scales, often encompassing many types of land cover, yet the effect of landscape context on propagule pressure remains largely unknown. Many studies have reported a positive correlation between invasive plant abundance and human land use; increased propagule pressure in these landscapes may be responsible for this correlation. We tested the hypothesis that increased rates of...

Data from: Size, sex, and individual-level behavior drive intra-population variation in cross-ecosystem foraging of a top-predator

James C. Nifong, Craig A. Layman & Brian R. Silliman
1. Large-bodied, top-predators are often highly mobile, with the potential to provide important linkages between spatially distinct food webs. What biological factors contribute to variation in cross-ecosystem movements, however, have rarely been examined. 2. Here, we investigated how ontogeny (body size), sex, and individual-level behavior impacts intra-population variation in cross-ecosystem foraging (i.e., between freshwater and marine systems), by the top-predator Alligator mississippiensis. 3. Field surveys revealed A. mississippiensis uses marine ecosystems regularly and are abundant...

Data from: Effect of mutualist partner identity on plant demography

Emilio M. Bruna, Thiago Junqueira Izzo, Brian D. Inouye & Heraldo L. Vasconcelos
Mutualisms play a central role in the origin and maintenance of biodiversity. Because many mutualisms have strong demographic effects, interspecific variation in partner quality could have important consequences for population dynamics. Nevertheless, few studies have quantified how a mutualist partner influences population growth rates, and still fewer have compared the demographic impacts of multiple partner species. We used integral projection models parameterized with three years of census data to compare the demographic effects of two...

Data from: Silenced rRNA genes are activated and substitute for partially eliminated active homoelogs in the recently formed allotetraploid, Tragopogon mirus (Asteraceae)

Ales Kovařík, Eva Dobešová, Roman Matyášek, Andrew R. Leitch, Pamela S. Soltis, Douglas E. Soltis & Hana Malinska
To study the relationship between uniparental rDNA (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S ribosomal RNA) silencing (nucleolar dominance) and rRNA gene dosage, we studied a recently emerged (within the last 80 years) allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus (2n=24), formed from the diploid progenitors T. dubius (2n=12, D-genome donor) and T. porrifolius (2n=12, P-genome donor). Here, we used molecular, cytogenetic and genomic approaches to analyse rRNA gene activity in two sibling T. mirus plants (33A and 33B) with widely...

Data from: Shifts of tundra bacterial and archaeal communities along a permafrost thaw gradient in Alaska

Jie Deng, Yunfu Gu, Jin Zhang, Kai Xue, Yujia Qin, Mengting Yuan, Huaqun Yin, Zhili He, Liyou Wu, Edward Schuur, James Tiedje, Jizhong Zhou, James M. Tiedje & Edward A. G. Schuur
Understanding the response of permafrost microbial communities to climate warming is crucial for evaluating ecosystem feedbacks to global change. This study investigated soil bacterial and archaeal communities by Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons across a permafrost thaw gradient at different depths in Alaska with thaw progression for over three decades. Over 4.6 million passing 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from a total of 97 samples, corresponding to 61 known classes and...

Data from: Rigorous approaches to species delimitation have significant implications for African crocodilian systematics and conservation

Matthew Shirley, Kent Vliet, Amanda Carr, James Austin, J. D. Austin, A. N. Carr, M. H. Shirley & K. A. Vliet
Accurate species delimitation is a central assumption of biology that, in groups such as the Crocodylia, is often hindered by highly conserved morphology and frequent introgression. In Africa, crocodilian systematics has been hampered by complex regional biogeography and confounded taxonomic history. We used rigorous molecular and morphological species delimitation methods to test the hypothesis that the slender-snouted croco- dile (Mecistops cataphractus) is composed of multiple species corresponding to the Congolian and Guinean biogeographic zones. Speciation...

Data from: Women are underrepresented on the editorial boards of journals in environmental biology and natural resource management

Alyssa H. Cho, Shelley A. Johnson, Carrie E. Schuman, Jennifer M. Adler, Oscar Gonzalez, Sarah J. Graves, Jana R. Huebner, D. Blaine Marchant, Sami W. Rifai, Irina Skinner, Emilio M. Bruna & Shelly A. Johnson
Despite women earning similar numbers of graduate degrees as men in STEM disciplines, they are underrepresented in upper level positions in both academia and industry. Editorial board memberships are an important example of such positions; membership is both a professional honor in recognition of achievement and an opportunity for professional advancement. We surveyed 10 highly regarded journals in environmental biology, natural resource management, and plant sciences to quantify the number of women on their editorial...

Data from: The evolution of peafowl and other taxa with ocelli (eyespots): a phylogenomic approach

Keping Sun, Kelly A. Meiklejohn, Brant C. Faircloth, Travis C. Glenn, Edward L. Braun & Rebecca T. Kimball
The most striking feature of peafowl (Pavo) is the males' elaborate train, which exhibits ocelli (ornamental eyespots) that are under sexual selection. Two additional genera within the Phasianidae (Polyplectron and Argusianus) exhibit ocelli, but the appearance and location of these ornamental eyespots exhibit substantial variation among these genera, raising the question of whether ocelli are homologous. Within Polyplectron, ocelli are ancestral, suggesting ocelli may have evolved even earlier, prior to the divergence among genera. However,...

Data from: Phylogenetic signal detection from an ancient rapid radiation: effects of noise reduction, long-branch attraction, and model selection in crown clade Apocynaceae

Shannon C. K. Straub, Michael J. Moore, Pamela S. Soltis, Douglas E. Soltis, Aaron Liston, Tatyana Livshultz & Shannon C.K. Straub
Crown clade Apocynaceae comprise seven primary lineages of lianas, shrubs, and herbs with a diversity of pollen aggregation morphologies including monads, tetrads, and pollinia, making them an ideal group for investigating the evolution and function of pollen packaging. Traditional molecular systematic approaches utilizing small amounts of sequence data have failed to resolve relationships along the spine of the crown clade, a likely ancient rapid radiation. The previous best estimate of the phylogeny was a five-way...

Data from: Mechanisms of plant–plant interactions: concealment from herbivores is more important than abiotic-stress mediation in an African savannah

Allison M. Louthan, Daniel F. Doak, Jacob R. Goheen, Todd M. Palmer & Robert M. Pringle
Recent work on facilitative plant–plant interactions has emphasized the importance of neighbours’ amelioration of abiotic stress, but the facilitative effects of neighbours in reducing plant apparency to herbivores have received less attention. Whereas theory on stress reduction predicts that competition should be more important in less stressful conditions, with facilitation becoming more important in harsh environments, apparency theory suggests that facilitation should be greater in the presence of herbivores, where it is disadvantageous to be...

Data from: Synergistic effects of direct and indirect defences on herbivore egg survival in a wild crucifer

Nina E. Fatouros, Ana Pineda, Martinus E. Huigens, Colette Broekgaarden, Ilich A. Figueroa Candia, Methew M. Shimwela, Patrick Verbaarschot & Tibor Bukovinszky
Evolutionary theory of plant defences against herbivores predicts a trade-off between direct (anti-herbivore traits) and indirect defences (attraction of carnivores) when carnivore fitness is reduced. Such a trade-off is expected in plant species that kill herbivore eggs by exhibiting a hypersensitive response (HR)-like necrosis, which should then negatively affect carnivores. We used the black mustard (Brassica nigra) to investigate how this potentially lethal direct trait affects preferences and/or performances of specialist cabbage white butterflies (Pieris...

Data from: Interactive effects of a non-native invasive grass Microstegium vimineum and herbivore exclusion on experimental tree regeneration under differing forest management

Daniel J. Johnson, S. Luke Flory, Angela Shelton, Cynthia Huebner & Keith Clay
1. Invasive plants, herbivores and site management history can play crucial roles in determining plant community composition. The net effects of invasive species on plant communities are well known, but we have a poor understanding of the relative contributions of direct competitive effects of invasive species and their interactions with herbivores and management practices. Understanding interactions among plant invasions, herbivores and management history is critical for predicting and managing long-term ecological effects of invasions on...

Data from: Homing of invasive Burmese pythons in South Florida: evidence for map and compass senses in snakes

Shannon E. Pittman, Kristen M. Hart, Michael S. Cherkiss, Ray W. Snow, Ikuko Fujisaki, Brian J. Smith, Frank J. Mazzotti & Michael E. Dorcas
Navigational ability is a critical component of an animal's spatial ecology and may influence the invasive potential of species. Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) are apex predators invasive to South Florida. We tracked the movements of 12 adult Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park, six of which were translocated 21–36 km from their capture locations. Translocated snakes oriented movement homeward relative to the capture location, and five of six snakes returned to within 5 km...

Data from: Functional attributes of savannah soils: contrasting effects of tree canopies and herbivores on bulk density, nutrients and moisture dynamics

Ricardo M. Holdo & Michelle C. Mack
1. Savannahs are highly heterogeneous tree-grass mixtures, and the structural variation imposed by a discontinuous canopy cover results in spatial variation in soil properties such as plant-available nutrients, temperature and soil moisture. Many savannahs are also dominated by large vertebrate herbivores, which impose a different suite of effects on soil properties related to consumption, excretion and physical disturbance. 2. In nutrient-poor, water-limited systems, variation in soil resource availability may play a fundamental role in structuring...

Data from: Arboreal camera trapping: taking a proven method to new heights

Tremaine Gregory, Farah Carrasco Rueda, Jessica Deichmann, Joseph Kolowski & Alfonso Alonso
1. Although camera trapping has been shown to be a highly effective non-invasive tool for wildlife monitoring, the technique has not yet been widely applied to studies of arboreal species. Despite the unique challenges that camera trapping in the canopy poses, its versatility and relatively non-invasive nature, combined with recent technological improvements on the cameras themselves, make camera trapping a highly useful tool for arboreal research. 2. We present data on the methodology and effectiveness...

Data from: Acquisition of germ plasm accelerates vertebrate evolution.

Teri Evans, Christopher M. Wade, Frank A. Chapman, Andrew D. Johnson & Matthew Loose
Primordial germ cell (PGC) specification occurs either by induction from pluripotent cells (epigenesis) or by a cell-autonomous mechanism mediated by germ plasm (preformation). Among vertebrates, epigenesis is basal, whereas germ plasm has evolved convergently across lineages and is associated with greater speciation. We compared protein-coding sequences of vertebrate species that employ preformation with their sister taxa that use epigenesis and demonstrate that genes evolve more rapidly in species containing germ plasm. Furthermore, differences in rates...

Data from: Outer bark thickness decreases more with height on stems of fire-resistant than fire-sensitive Floridian oaks (Quercus spp.; Fagaceae)

Sarah J. Graves, Sami W. Rifai & Francis E. Putz
Premise of the study: In ecosystems maintained by low-intensity surface fires, tree bark thickness is a determinant of fire-survival because it protects underlying tissues from heat damage. However, it has been unclear whether relatively thick bark is maintained at all heights or only near the ground where damage is most likely. Methods: We studied six Quercus species from the red and white clades, with three species characteristic of fire-maintained savannas and three species characteristic of...

Data from: Sex-biased avian host use by arbovirus vectors

Nathan D. Burkett-Cadena, Andrea M. Bingham & Thomas R. Unnasch
Prevalence of arthropod-borne parasites often differs drastically between host sexes. This sex-related disparity may be related to physiological (primarily hormonal) differences that facilitate or suppress replication of the pathogen in host tissues. Alternately, differences in pathogen prevalence between host sexes may be owing to differential exposure to infected vectors. Here, we report on the use of PCR-based assays recognizing bird sex chromosomes to investigate sex-related patterns of avian host use from field-collected female mosquitoes from...

Data from: Sexual selection is influenced by both developmental and adult environments

Stephanie R. Gillespie, M. Scarlett Tudor, Allen J. Moore & Christine W. Miller
Sexual selection is often assumed to be strong and consistent, yet increasing research shows it can fluctuate over space and time. Few experimental studies have examined changes in sexual selection in response to natural environmental variation. Here, we use a difference in resource quality to test for the influence of past environmental conditions and current environmental conditions on male and female mate choice and resulting selection gradients for leaf-footed cactus bugs, Narnia femorata. We raised...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    37

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    37

Affiliations

  • University of Florida
    37
  • University of Georgia
    3
  • Princeton University
    2
  • University of Wyoming
    2
  • University of Nottingham
    2
  • Florida Museum of Natural History
    2
  • University of Colorado Boulder
    2
  • University of Missouri
    2
  • Queens College, CUNY
    2
  • Eastern Washington University
    1