68 Works

Data from: Defaunation and fragmentation erode small mammal diversity dimensions in tropical forests

Ricardo S. Bovendorp, Fernanda T. Brum, Robert A. McCleery, Benjamin Baiser, Rafael Loyola, Marcus V. Cianciaruso & Mauro Galetti
Forest fragmentation and defaunation are considered the main drivers of biodiversity loss, yet the synergistic effects of landscape changes and biotic interactions on assemblage structure have been poorly investigated. Here, we use an extensive dataset of 283 assemblages and 105 species of small mammals to understand how defaunation of medium and large mammals and forest fragmentation change the community composition and diversity of rodents and marsupials in tropical forests of South America. We used structured...

Data from: Standing geographic variation in eclosion time and the genomics of host race formation in Rhagoletis pomonella fruit flies

Meredith M. Doellman, Scott P. Egan, Gregory J. Ragland, Peter J. Meyers, Glen R. Hood, Thomas H.Q. Powell, Peter Lazorchak, Daniel A. Hahn, Stewart H. Berlocher, Patrik Nosil, Jeff L. Feder, Jeffrey L. Feder & Thomas H. Q. Powell
Taxa harboring high levels of standing variation may be more likely to adapt to rapid environmental shifts and experience ecological speciation. Here, we characterize geographic and host-related differentiation for 10,241 single nucleotide polymorphisms in Rhagoletis pomonella fruit flies to infer if standing genetic variation in adult eclosion time in the ancestral hawthorn (Crataegus spp.)-infesting host race, as opposed to new mutations, contributed substantially to its recent shift to earlier fruiting apple (Malus domestica). Allele frequency...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Data from: A selective fungal transport organ (mycangium) maintains coarse phylogenetic congruence between fungus-farming ambrosia beetles and their symbionts

James Skelton, Andrew J. Johnson, Michelle A. Jusino, Craig C. Bateman, You Li & Jiri Hulcr
Thousands of species of ambrosia beetles excavate tunnels in wood to farm fungi. They maintain associations with particular lineages of fungi, but the phylogenetic extent and mechanisms of fidelity are unknown. We test the hypothesis that selectivity of their mycangium enforces fidelity at coarse phylogenetic scales, while permitting promiscuity among closely related fungal mutualists. We confirm a single evolutionary origin of the Xylosandrus complex – a group of several xyleborine genera that farm fungi in...

Data from: Head-to-head comparison of three experimental methods of quantifying competitive fitness in C. elegans

Timothy A. Crombie, Sayran Saber, Ayush Shekhar Saxena, Robyn Egan & Charles F. Baer
Organismal fitness is relevant in many contexts in biology. The most meaningful experimental measure of fitness is competitive fitness, when two or more entities (e.g., genotypes) are allowed to compete directly. In theory, competitive fitness is simple to measure: an experimental population is initiated with the different types in known proportions and allowed to evolve under experimental conditions to a predefined endpoint. In practice, there are several obstacles to obtaining robust estimates of competitive fitness...

Data from: Predictors of alcohol responsiveness in dystonia

Johanna Junker, Valerie Brandt, Brian D. Berman, Marie Vidailhet, Emmanuel Roze, Anne Weissbach, Cynthia Comella, Irene A. Malaty, Joseph Jankovic, Mark S. LeDoux, Alfredo Berardelli, Richard Barbano, Stephen G. Reich, Joel S. Perlmutter, Hyder A. Jinnah & Norbert Brüggemann
Objective: To determine predictors of alcohol responsiveness in a large cohort of dystonia patients. Methods: 2159 participants with dystonia were prospectively enrolled in the cross-sectional Dystonia Coalition multicenter study. Patients with secondary, combined or confirmed genetic dystonia (total n=164) or unknown alcohol responsiveness (n= 737) were excluded. Patients answered a standardized questionnaire and were clinically examined using a standardized video protocol and the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale. Alcohol responsiveness was determined by patients’ self-report. Results:...

Data from: The complete mitochondrial genome of the sea urchin, Echinometra sp. EZ

Remi N. Ketchum, Melissa B. DeBiasse, Joseph F. Ryan, John A. Burt & Adam M. Reitzel
The complete mitogenome of Echinometra sp. EZ has been described and fully annotated in this study. Cytochrome subunit one phylogenetic analysis of six Echinometra species confirms that our sample is E. sp. EZ. The mitogenome is 15,698 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs, and a non-coding region with an identical organization to other Echinoidea. The E. sp. EZ mitogenome shared ~99.1% identity to the published Echinometra mathaei mitogenome, differing...

Data from: Divergent rates of change between tree cover types in a tropical pastoral region

Bryan C. Tarbox, Carlita Fiestas & T. Trevor Caughlin
Context: Forest cover change analyses have revealed net forest gain in many tropical regions. While most analyses have focused solely on forest cover, trees outside forests are vital components of landscape integrity. Quantifying regional-scale patterns of tree cover change, including non-forest trees, could benefit forest and landscape restoration (FLR) efforts. Objectives: We analyzed tree cover change in Southwestern Panama to quantify: 1) patterns of change from 1998-2014, 2) differences in rates of change between forest...

Data from: Integrating encounter theory with decision analysis to evaluate collision risk and determine optimal protection zones for wildlife

Bradley J. Udell, Julien Martin, , Mathieu Bonneau, Holly Edwards, Timothy A. Gowan, Stacie K. Hardy, Eliezer Gurarie, Charles Calleson, Charles J. Deutsch, Robert J. Fletcher & Charles S. Calleson
1. Better understanding human-wildlife interactions and their links with management can help improve the design of wildlife protection zones. One important example is the problem of wildlife collisions with vehicles or human-built structures (e.g. power lines, wind farms). In fact, collisions between marine wildlife and watercraft are among the major threats faced by several endangered species of marine mammals. Natural resource managers are therefore interested in finding cost-effective solutions to mitigate these threats. 2. We...

Data from: Trait-specific processes of convergence and conservatism shape ecomorphological evolution in ground-dwelling squirrels

Bryan S. McLean, Kristofer M. Helgen, H. Thomas Goodwin & Joseph A. Cook
Our understanding of mechanisms operating over deep timescales to shape phenotypic diversity often hinges on linking variation in one or few trait(s) to specific evolutionary processes. When distinct processes are capable of similar phenotypic signatures, however, identifying these drivers is difficult. We explored ecomorphological evolution across a radiation of ground-dwelling squirrels whose history includes convergence and constraint, two processes that can yield similar signatures of standing phenotypic diversity. Using 4 ecologically-relevant trait datasets (body size,...

Data from: Evolutionary history of the angiosperm flora of China

Li-Min Lu, Ling-Feng Mao, Tuo Yang, Jian-Fei Ye, Bing Liu, Hong-Lei Li, Miao Sun, Joseph T. Miller, Sarah Mathews, Hai-Hua Hu, Yan-Ting Niu, Dan-Xiao Peng, You-Hua Chen, Stephen A. Smith, Min Chen, Kun-Li Xiang, Chi-Toan Le, Viet-Cuong Dang, An-Ming Lu, Pamela S. Soltis, Douglas E. Soltis, Jian-Hua Li & Zhi-Duan Chen
High species diversity may result from recent rapid speciation in a ‘cradle’ and/or the gradual accumulation and preservation of species over time in a ‘museum’1,2. China harbours nearly 10% of angiosperm species worldwide and has long been considered as both a museum, owing to the presence of many species with hypothesized ancient origins3,4, and a cradle, as many lineages have originated as recent topographic changes and climatic shifts—such as the formation of the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau...

Data from: Phenotypic and transcriptomic responses to salinity stress across genetically and geographically divergent Tigriopus californicus populations

Melissa B. De Biasse, Yasmeen Kawji, Morgan W. Kelly & Melissa B. DeBiasse
Species inhabiting the North American west coast intertidal must tolerate an extremely variable environment, with large fluctuations in both temperature and salinity. Uncovering the mechanisms for this tolerance is key to understanding species’ persistence. We tested for differences in salinity tolerance between populations of Tigriopus californicus copepods from locations in northern (Bodega Reserve) and southern (San Diego) California known to differ in temperature, precipitation, and humidity. We also tested for differences between populations in their...

Data from: Integrative identification of incipient lineages in Heuchera longiflora (Saxifragaceae)

Ryan F. Folk, Julian C. Ginori, Douglas E. Soltis & Aaron J. Floden
Following on emerging understanding of the diversification process, many recent workers have considered infraspecific taxa as valuable for formally recognizing incompletely speciated entities. The distinction between a species and an infraspecific taxon represents a fundamentally subjective weighting of evidence, yet this points further to the need for an evidential basis for these decisions. We explore these concepts in Heuchera longiflora (Saxifragaceae), which is morphologically variable and has a disjunct range across several physiographic provinces in...

Data from: Stream community richness predicts apex predator occupancy dynamics in riparian systems

Angela M. Holland, Eric M. Schauber, Clayton K. Nielsen & Eric C. Hellgren
Streams and adjacent riparian habitats represent linked terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems that exchange materials and energy. Recognized relationships among apex predators and ecosystem biodiversity led us to hypothesize that these predators in riparian-stream systems were more likely to be found in sites with high stream quality, defined as increased ecosystem function and integrity. In our freshwater study system, river otter (Lontra canadensis) and mink (Neovison vison) play critical roles as apex predators. We used multi-season...

Data from: Genome-wide exon-capture approach identifies genetic variants of Norway spruce genes associated with susceptibility to Heterobasidion parviporum infection

Mukrimin Mukrimin, Andriy Kovalchuk, Leandro G. Neves, Emad H. A. Jaber, Matti Haapanen, Matias Kirst & Fred O. Asiegbu
Root and butt rot caused by members of the Heterobasidion annosum species complex is the most economically important disease of conifer trees in boreal forests. Wood decay in the infected trees dramatically decreases their value and causes considerable losses to forest owners. Trees vary in their susceptibility to Heterobasidion infection, but the genetic determinants underlying the variation in the susceptibility are not well-understood. We performed the identification of Norway spruce genes associated with the resistance...

Data from: Body size shifts influence effects of increasing temperatures on ectotherm metabolism

Kristina Riemer, Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira, Felisa A. Smith, David J. Harris, S.K. Morgan Ernest & S. K. Morgan Ernest
Aim: Warmer temperatures directly increase metabolic rates of ectotherms, but temperature also indirectly affects metabolic rates. Higher temperatures result in smaller body sizes and associated decreases in metabolic rates, and it remains unknown whether this indirect effect of temperature increase could mitigate the direct positive effect of temperature on metabolic rate. Here, we assess whether temperature‐induced shifts in body size are likely to offset the direct influence of temperature on metabolic rate. Location: Global. Time...

Data from: Parental and offspring larval diets interact to influence life history traits and dengue virus infection of offspring in Aedes aegypti

Kylie Zirbel, Bradley Eastmond & Barry W. Alto
The environmental conditions experienced by parents can influence offspring phenotype along with the conditions experienced by offspring. These parental effects are clear in organisms that display parental care and are less clear in other organisms. Here we consider effects of parental and offspring larval nutrition on offspring development time, survivorship, and infection with dengue virus in Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever and Zika. Parents were raised on either high or...

Data from: The hidden cost of sexually selected traits: the metabolic expense of maintaining a sexually selected weapon

Ummat Somjee, H. Arthur Woods, Meghan Duell & Christine W. Miller
Sexually selected weapons are among the most exaggerated traits in nature. Theory frequently assumes a high cost of this exaggeration; yet, those costs are rarely measured. We know very little about the energetic resources required to maintain these traits at rest and the difference in energetic costs for the largest relative to the smallest individuals. Knowledge in this area is crucial; resting metabolic rate can account for 30-40% of daily energy expenditure in wild animals....

Registration Year

  • 2018
    68

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    68

Affiliations

  • University of Florida
    68
  • University of Georgia
    4
  • Michigan State University
    4
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    3
  • Florida Museum of Natural History
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • University of Montana
    2
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • Rice University
    2
  • Stanford University
    2