4 Works

Data from: Correlated evolution of mating system and floral display traits in flowering plants and its implications for the distribution of mating system variation

Carol Goodwillie, Risa D. Sargent, Susan Kalisz, Richard H. Ree, David A. Moeller, Mario Vallejo-Marin, Christopher G. Eckert, Alice A. Winn, Elizabeth Elle, Monica A. Geber & Mark O. Johnston
Reduced allocation to structures for pollinator attraction is predicted in selfing species. We explored the association between outcrossing and floral display in a broad sample of angiosperms. We used the demonstrated relationship to test for bias against selfing species in the outcrossing rate distribution, the shape of which has relevance for the stability of mixed mating. Relationships between outcrossing rate, flower size, flower number and floral display, measured as the product of flower size and...

Data from: Kin recognition: evidence that humans can perceive both positive and negative relatedness

Daniel B. Krupp, Lisa M. DeBruine, Benedict C. Jones & Martin L. Lalumière
The evolution of spite entails actors imposing costs on ‘negative’ relatives: those who are less likely than chance to share the actor’s alleles and therefore more likely to bear rival alleles. Yet, despite a considerable body of research confirming that organisms can recognise positive relatives, little research has shown that organisms can recognise negative relatives. Here, we extend previous work on human phenotype matching by introducing a cue to negative relatedness: negative self-resembling faces, which...

Data from: Multilocus estimation of selfing and its heritability

Nathan S. McClure & Michael C. Whitlock
We describe a new method of estimating the selfing rate (S) in a mixed mating population based on a population structure approach that accounts for possible intergenerational correlation in selfing rate, giving rise to an estimate of the upper limit for heritability of selfing rate (h^2). A correlation between generations in selfing rate is shown to affect one- and two-locus probabilities of identity by descent. Conventional estimates of selfing rate based on a population structure...

Data from: The evolutionary enigma of mixed mating systems in plants: occurrence, theoretical explanations, and empirical evidence

Carol Goodwillie, Susan Kalisz & Christopher G. Eckert
Mixed mating, in which hermaphrodite plant species reproduce by both self- and cross-fertilization, presents a challenging problem for evolutionary biologists. Theory suggests that inbreeding depression, the main selective factor opposing the evolution of selfing, can be purged with self-fertilization, a process that is expected to yield pure strategies of either outcrossing or selfing. Here we present updated evidence suggesting that mixed mating systems are frequent in seed plants. We outline the floral and pollination mechanisms...

Registration Year

  • 2012
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Queen's University
    4
  • University of Pittsburgh
    2
  • East Carolina University
    2
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1
  • Department of Plant Biology
    1
  • University of Aberdeen
    1
  • Dalhousie University
    1
  • Simon Fraser University
    1
  • University of Ottawa
    1
  • University of British Columbia
    1