11 Works

Data from: Resource limitation prevents the emergence of drug resistance by intensifying within-host competition

Nina Wale, Derek G. Sim, Matthew J. Jones, Rahel Salathe, Troy Day & Andrew F. Read
Slowing the evolution of antimicrobial resistance is essential if we are to continue to successfully treat infectious diseases. Whether a drug-resistant mutant grows to high densities, and so sickens the patient and spreads to new hosts, is determined by the competitive interactions it has with drug-susceptible pathogens within the host. Competitive interactions thus represent a good target for resistance management strategies. Using an in vivo model of malaria infection, we show that limiting a resource...

Data from: Noise affects resource assessment in an invertebrate

Erin P. Walsh, Gareth Arnott & Hansjoerg P. Kunc
Anthropogenic noise is a global pollutant, affecting animals across taxa. However, how noise pollution affects resource acquisition is unknown. Hermit crabs (Pagurus bernhardus) engage in detailed assessment and decision-making when selecting a critical resource, their shell; this is crucial as individuals in poor shells suffer lower reproductive success and higher mortality. We experimentally exposed hermit crabs to anthropogenic noise during shell selection. When exposed to noise, crabs approached the shell faster, spent less time investigating...

Data from: Outlier analyses to test for local adaptation to breeding grounds in a migratory arctic seabird

Anna Tigano, Allison J. Shultz, Scott V. Edwards, Gregory J. Robertson & Vicki L. Friesen
Investigating the extent (or the existence) of local adaptation is crucial to understanding how populations adapt. When experiments or fitness measurements are difficult or impossible to perform in natural populations, genomic techniques allow us to investigate local adaptation through the comparison of allele frequencies and outlier loci along environmental clines. The thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia) is a highly philopatric colonial arctic seabird that occupies a significant environmental gradient, shows marked phenotypic differences among colonies, and...

Data from: Comparison of diets for largemouth and smallmouth bass in Eastern Lake Ontario using DNA barcoding and stable isotope analysis

Erich J.H. Nelson, Jeremy Holden, Robert Eves, Bruce Tufts & Erich J. H. Nelson
Largemouth (LMB: Micropterus salmoides) and Smallmouth Bass (SMB: Micropterus dolomieu) are important species in the recreational fisheries of the Laurentian Great Lakes. The invasion of the Round Goby (Neogobius melanostomus) into these lakes has changed several facets of black bass biology, but there is still much to learn about the relationship between these species. Previous dietary analyses have shown Round Goby to be important prey for bass, but have been limited by low visual identification...

Data from: Consequences of multiple mating-system shifts for population and range-wide genetic structure in a coastal dune plant

Adriana López-Villalobos & Christopher G. Eckert
Evolutionary transitions from outcrossing to selfing can strongly affect the genetic diversity and structure of species at multiple spatial scales. We investigated the genetic consequences of mating system shifts in the North American, Pacific coast dune endemic plant Camissoniopsis cheiranthifolia (Onagraceae) by assaying variation at 13 nuclear (n) and six chloroplast (cp) microsatellite (SSR) loci for 38 populations across the species range. As predicted from the expected reduction of effective population size (Ne) caused by...

Data from: Fluff-thieving birds sabotage seed dispersal

Vanya G. Rohwer, Anton Pauw & Paul R. Martin
Characterizing many species interactions as mutualisms can be misleading because some members of the interaction derive greater fitness benefits at the expense of other members. We provide detailed natural history data on a suspected bird–plant mutualism in South Africa where many species of birds use fluffy Eriocephalus seed material to construct their nests, potentially dispersing seeds for the plant. We focus on a common bird, Prinia maculosa, which invests heavily in gathering Eriocephalus material. Prinias...

Data from: Global biogeography of mating system variation in seed plants

David A. Moeller, Ryan D. Briscoe Runquist, Annika M. Moe, Monica A. Geber, Carol Goodwillie, Pierre-Olivier Cheptou, Christopher G. Eckert, Elizabeth Elle, Mark O. Johnston, Susan Kalisz, Richard H. Ree, Risa D. Sargent, Mario Vallejo-Marin & Alice A. Winn
Latitudinal gradients in biotic interactions have been suggested as causes of global patterns of biodiversity and phenotypic variation. Plant biologists have long speculated that outcrossing mating systems are more common at low than high latitudes owing to a greater predictability of plant–pollinator interactions in the tropics; however, these ideas have not previously been tested. Here, we present the first global biogeographic analysis of plant mating systems based on 624 published studies from 492 taxa. We...

Data from: Ice-cover is the principal driver of ecological change in High Arctic lakes and ponds

Katherine Griffiths, Neal Michelutti, Madeline Sugar, Marianne S.V. Douglas, John P. Smol & Marianne S. V. Douglas
Recent climate change has been especially pronounced in the High Arctic, however, the responses of aquatic biota, such as diatoms, can be modified by site-specific environmental characteristics. To assess if climate-mediated ice cover changes affect the diatom response to climate, we used paleolimnological techniques to examine shifts in diatom assemblages from ten High Arctic lakes and ponds from Ellesmere Island and nearby Pim Island (Nunavut, Canada). The sites were divided a priori into four groups...

Data from: Checkerboard score-area relationships reveal spatial scales of plant community structure

Gordon G. McNickle, Eric G. Lamb, Mike Lavender, , Brandon S. Schamp, Steven D. Siciliano, Richard Condit, Stephen P. Hubbell, Jennifer L. Baltzer & James F Cahill
Identifying the spatial scale at which particular mechanisms influence plant community assembly is crucial to understanding the mechanisms structuring communities. It has long been recognized that many elements of community structure are sensitive to area; however the majority of studies examining patterns of community structure use a single relatively small sampling area. As different assembly mechanisms likely cause patterns at different scales we investigate how plant species co-occurrence patterns change with sampling unit scale. We...

Data from: Direct benefits of choosing a high fitness mate can offset the indirect costs associated with intralocus sexual conflict

Alison Pischedda & Adam K. Chippindale
Intralocus sexual conflict generates a cost to mate choice: high fitness partners transmit genetic variation that confers lower fitness to offspring of the opposite sex. Our earlier work in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, revealed that these indirect genetic costs were sufficient to reverse potential “good genes” benefits of sexual selection. However, mate choice can also confer direct fitness benefits by inducing larger numbers of progeny. Here, we consider whether direct benefits through enhanced fertility...

Data from: Sympatric population divergence within a highly pelagic seabird species complex (Hydrobates spp.)

Rebecca S. Taylor, Anna Bailie, Previn Gulavita, Tim Birt, Tomas Aarvak, Tycho Anker-Nilssen, Daniel C. Barton, Kirsten Lindquist, Yuliana Bedolla-Guzmán, Petra Quillfeldt & Vicki L. Friesen
Both physical and non-physical barriers can restrict gene flow among seabird populations. Understanding the relative importance of non-physical barriers, such as breeding phenology, is key to understanding seabird biodiversity. We investigated drivers of diversification in the Leach’s storm-petrel species complex (Hydrobates spp.) by examining population genetic structure across its range. Variation in the mitochondrial control region and six microsatellite loci was assayed in birds sampled from breeding colonies throughout the North Atlantic and North Pacific...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Queen's University
    11
  • Cornell University
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  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • Wilfrid Laurier University
    1
  • Queen's University Belfast
    1
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1
  • University of Saskatchewan
    1
  • Algoma University
    1
  • University of Alberta
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  • University of Minnesota
    1