447 Works

Punctuational ecological changes rather than global factors drive species diversification and the evolution of wing phenotypes in Morpho butterflies

Nicolas Chazot, Patrick Blandin, Vincent Debat, Marianne Elias & Fabien Condamine
Assessing the relative importance of geographical and ecological drivers of evolution is paramount to understand the diversification of species and traits at the macroevolutionary scale. Here, we use an integrative approach, combining phylogenetics, biogeography, ecology, and quantified phenotypes to investigate the drivers of both species and phenotypic diversification of the iconic Neotropical butterfly genus Morpho. We generated a time-calibrated phylogeny for all known species and inferred historical biogeography. We fitted models of time-dependent (accounting for...

Data from: Season rather than habitat affects lynx survival and risk of mortality in the human-dominated landscape of southern Sweden

Henrik Andren, Aronsson Malin, José V. Lopez-Bao, Gustaf Samelius, Guillaume Chapron, Geir Rune Rauset, Heather Hemmingmoore & Jens Persson
Landscapes are mosaics of habitat associated with different risks and resources, including human activities, which can affect individual survival in wildlife. Different relationships between habitat characteristics and human-caused and natural mortality can result in attractive sinks. We used individual-based data from 97 Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) monitored for 160 exposure years to link adult survival and the risk of mortality to home range habitat characteristics in the human-dominated landscape of southern Sweden. Human-caused mortality dominated...

Saiga antelope die-off and calving sites in Kazakhstan

S. J. Robinson, N. Singh & S. Zuther
This dataset records the Saiga antelope die-off and calving sites in Kazakhstan. It represents the locations (and where available dates) of (i) die-offs and (ii) normal calving events in the Betpak-dala population of the saiga antelope, in which three major mass mortality events have been recorded since 1988. In total, the data contains 214 saiga die-off and calving sites obtained from field visits, aerial surveys, telemetry and literature. Locations derived from field data, aerial surveys...

Data from: Intransitive competition is common across five major taxonomic groups and is driven by productivity, competitive rank and functional traits.

Santiago Soliveres, Anika Lehmann, Steffen Boch, Florian Altermatt, Francesco Carrara, Thomas W. Crowther, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, Anne Kempel, Daniel S. Maynard, Matthias C. Rillig, Brajesh K. Singh, Pankaj Trivedi & Eric Allan
1. Competition can be fully hierarchical or intransitive, and this degree of hierarchy is driven by multiple factors, including environmental conditions, the functional traits of the species involved or the topology of competition networks. Studies simultaneously analyzing these drivers of competition hierarchy are rare. Additionally, organisms compete either directly or via interference competition for resources or space, within a local neighbourhood or across the habitat. Therefore, the drivers of competition could change accordingly and depend...

Data from: Variation in home-field advantage and ability in leaf litter decomposition across successional gradients

G.F. Ciska Veen, Ashley D. Keiser, Wim H. Van Der Putten, David A. Wardle & G. F. Ciska Veen
1. It is increasingly recognized that interactions between plants and soil (a)biotic conditions can influence local decomposition processes. For example, decomposer communities may become specialized in breaking down litter of plant species that they are associated with, resulting in accelerated decomposition, known as ‘home-field advantage’ (HFA). Also, soils can vary inherently in their capacity to degrade organic compounds, known as ‘ability’. However, we have a poor understanding how environmental conditions drive the occurrence of HFA...

Data from: Villages and their old farmsteads are hot spots of bird diversity in agricultural landscapes

Zuzanna M. Rosin, Piotr Skórka, Tomas Pärt, Michał Żmihorski, Anna Ekner-Grzyb, Zbigniew Kwieciński & Piotr Tryjanowski
To counteract the decline of farmland biodiversity in Europe, it is crucial to recognize habitats that are hot spots. Old rural settlements (e.g. villages) may be such important habitats, although these presumably biodiversity-rich habitats have received little attention. Socio-economic changes in central-eastern Europe since 1989 mean that old homesteads and farmsteads are being replaced by new ones. We investigated bird species composition, richness and abundance at three spatial scales (single rural property, village and landscape)...

Data from: Interactive effects of pests increase seed yield

Vesna Gagic, Laura G. A. Riggi, Barbara Ekbom, Gerard Malsher, Adrien Rusch, Riccardo Bommarco & Laura GA Riggi
Loss in seed yield and therefore decrease in plant fitness due to simultaneous attacks by multiple herbivores is not necessarily additive, as demonstrated in evolutionary studies on wild plants. However, it is not clear how this transfers to crop plants that grow in very different conditions compared to wild plants. Nevertheless, loss in crop seed yield caused by any single pest is most often studied in isolation although crop plants are attacked by many pests...

Data from: Stable isotopes reveal the effect of trawl fisheries on the diet of commercially exploited species

Hilmar Hinz, Joan Moranta, Stephen Balestrini, Marija Sciberras, Julia R. Pantin, James Monnington, Alex Zalewski, Michel J. Kaiser, Mattias Sköld, Patrik Jonsson, Francois Bastardie & Jan Geert Hiddink
Bottom trawling can change food availability for benthivorous demersal species by (i) changing benthic prey composition through physical seabed impacts and (ii) by removing overall benthic consumer biomass increasing the net availability of benthic prey for remaining individuals. Thus trawling may both negatively and positively influence the quantity and quality of food available. Using δ13C and δ15N we investigated potential diet changes of three commercially exploited species across trawling gradients in the Kattegat (plaice, dab...

Data from: Effects of water level and grassland management on alpha and beta diversity of wet grassland birds in restored wetlands

Åke Berg, Michał Żmihorski, Tomas Pärt & Tomas Gustafson
Nearly 60% of European wetlands have been lost to drainage or to the cessation of grassland management. Large amounts of resources are put into wetland restoration with the aim to recover biodiversity. However, few studies have simultaneously evaluated effects of management, wetness and flooding dynamics on biodiversity of restored wetlands such as seasonally flooded wet grasslands. We inventoried bird communities over 4 years at 137 sites (each 3·1 ha) within five restored wet grassland areas...

Data from: Inorganic fungicides as routinely applied in organic and conventional agriculture can increase palatability but reduce microbial decomposition of leaf litter

Jochen P. Zubrod, Alexander Feckler, Dominic Englert, Natalia Koksharova, Ricki R. Rosenfeldt, Frank Seitz, Ralf Schulz & Mirco Bundschuh
1. The application of fungicides is considered an indispensable measure to secure crop production. These substances, however, may unintentionally enter surface waters via runoff, potentially affecting the microbial community. To assess such risks adequately, authorities recently called for suitable test designs involving relevant aquatic microorganisms. 2. We assessed the structural and functional responses of leaf-associated microbial communities, which play a key role in the breakdown of allochthonous leaf material in streams, towards the inorganic fungicides...

Data from: Environmental factors influence both abundance and genetic diversity in a widespread bird species

Yang Liu, Simone Webber, Katharine Bowgen, Lucie Schmaltz, Katharine Bradley, Peter Halvarsson, Mohanad Abdelgadir & Michael Griesser
Genetic diversity is one of the key evolutionary variables that correlate with population size, being of critical importance for population viability and the persistence of species. Genetic diversity can also have important ecological consequences within populations, and in turn, ecological factors may drive patterns of genetic diversity. However, the relationship between the genetic diversity of a population and how this interacts with ecological processes has so far only been investigated in a few studies. Here,...

Data from: A context-dependent induction of natal habitat preference in a generalist herbivorous insect

Patrick Lhomme, David Carrasco, Mattias Larsson, Bill Hansson & Peter Anderson
In many species adults exploit sensory information experienced in their natal habitat when searching for resources. This behavioral plasticity may help animals to establish themselves in new habitats by quickly locating suitable resources and avoiding unsuitable resources in complex environments. However the processes guiding positive or negative natal habitat preference induction (NHPI) remain poorly understood. In the polyphagous moth Spodoptera littoralis, earlier studies have shown that female innate host-plant preference is modulated by larval feeding...

Data from: Functional traits associated with the establishment of introduced Phytophthora spp. in Swedish forests

Miguel A. Redondo, Johanna Boberg, Jan Stenlid & Jonàs Oliva
1. Invasive forest pathogens of the genus Phytophthora are threatening ecosystems globally. Phytophthora species are mainly introduced by humans importing infected nursery stock. However, due to the presence of environmental filters, not all introduced Phytophthoras manage to establish and spread. Some Phytophthoras’ ability to overcome these filters may be linked to functional traits. In Northern Europe, the increasing number of reports calls for a better understanding of the invasion process to prevent future outbreaks. 2....

Data from: Intraspecific variability in growth response to environmental fluctuations modulates the stabilizing effect of species diversity on forest growth

Raphaël Aussenac, Yves Bergeron, Claudele Ghotsa Mekontchou, Dominique Gravel, Kamil Pilch & Igor Drobyshev
1.Differences between species in their response to environmental fluctuations cause asynchronized growth series, suggesting that species diversity may help communities buffer the effects of environmental fluctuations. However, within-species variability of responses may impact the stabilizing effect of growth asynchrony. 2.We used tree ring data to investigate the diversity-stability relationship and its underlying mechanisms within the temperate and boreal mixed woods of Eastern Canada. We worked at the individual tree level to take into account the...

Data from: Modelling the co-evolution of indirect genetic effects and inherited variability

Jovana Marjanovic, Han A. Mulder, Lars Rönnegård & Piter Bijma
When individuals interact, their phenotypes may be affected by genes in their social partners, a phenomenon known as Indirect Genetic Effects (IGEs). In aquaculture species and some plants, competition not only affects trait levels of individuals, but also inflates variation of trait values among individuals. Variability of trait values has been studied as a quantitative trait in itself, and is often referred to as inherited variability. Although the observed phenotypic relationship between competition and variability...

Data from: Relationships between plant traits, soil properties and carbon fluxes differ between monocultures and mixed communities in temperate grassland

Jonathan R. De Long, Benjamin G. Jackson, Anna Wilkinson, William J. Pritchard, Simon Oakley, Kelly E. Mason, Jörg G. Stephan, Nicholas J. Ostle, David Johnson, Elizabeth M. Baggs & Richard D. Bardgett
1. The use of plant traits to predict ecosystem functions has been gaining growing attention. Aboveground plant traits, such as leaf nitrogen (N) content and specific leaf area (SLA), have been shown to strongly relate to ecosystem productivity, respiration, and nutrient cycling. Further, increasing plant functional trait diversity has been suggested as a possible mechanism to increase ecosystem carbon (C) storage. However, it is uncertain whether belowground plant traits can be predicted by aboveground traits,...

Data from: Spatial contraction of demersal fish populations in a large marine ecosystem

Alessandro Orio, Ulf Bergström, Ann-Britt Florin, Andreas Lehmann, Ivo Šics & Michele Casini
Aim: The interdependencies between trophic interactions, environmental factors and anthropogenic forcing determine how species distributions change over time. Large changes in species distributions have occurred as a result of climate change. The objective of this study was to analyse how the spatial distribution of cod and flounder have changed in the Baltic Sea during the past four decades characterized by large hydrological changes. Location: Baltic Sea Taxon: Cod (Gadus morhua) and flounder (Platichthys flesus) Methods:...

Data from: Disentangling the ‘brown world’ faecal-detritus interaction web: dung beetle effects on soil microbial properties

Eleanor M. Slade, Tomas Roslin, Minna Santalahti & Thomas Bell
Many ecosystem services are sustained by the combined action of microscopic and macroscopic organisms, and shaped by interactions between the two. However, studies tend to focus on only one of these two components. We combined the two by investigating the impact of macrofauna on microbial community composition and functioning in the context of a major ecosystem process: the decomposition of dung. We compared bacterial communities of pasture soil and experimental dung pats inhabited by one...

Data from: Spatial variability in a plant-pollinator community across a continuous habitat: high heterogeneity in the face of apparent uniformity

Sara Reverté, Jordi Bosch, Xavier Arnan, Tomas Roslin, Constanti Stefanescu, J. A. Calleja, Roberto Molowny-Horas, Carlos Hernández-Castellano & Anselm Rodrigo
Large-scale spatial variability in plant-pollinator communities (e.g., along geographic gradients, across different landscapes) is relatively well understood. However, we know much less about how these communities vary at small scales within a uniform landscape. Plants are sessile and highly sensitive to microhabitat conditions, whereas pollinators are highly mobile and, for the most part, display generalist feeding habits. Therefore, we expect plants to show greater spatial variability than pollinators. We analysed the spatial heterogeneity of a...

Data from: Genome-wide association study of insect bite hypersensitivity in Swedish-born Icelandic horses

Merina Shrestha, Susanne Eriksson, Anouk Schurink, Lisa S. Andersson, Marie Sundquist, Rebecka Frey, Hans Broström, Tomas Bergström, Bart Ducro & Gabriella Lindgren
Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is the most common allergic skin disease in horses and is caused by biting midges, mainly of the genus Culicoides. The disease predominantly comprises a type I hypersensitivity reaction, causing severe itching and discomfort that reduce the welfare and commercial value of the horse. It is a multifactorial disorder influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, with heritability ranging from 0.16 to 0.27 in various horse breeds. The worldwide prevalence in...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Data from: The HypoMethylated Partial Restriction (HMPR) method reduces the repetitive content of genomic libraries in Norway spruce (Picea abies)

Hanna Larsson, Emanuele De Paoli, Michele Morgante, Martin Lascoux & Niclas Gyllenstrand
To evaluate the usefulness of Reduced Representation Libraries (RRL) in species with large and highly repetitive genomes such as conifers, we employed Hypomethylated Partial Restriction (HMPR) on the genome of Norway spruce (Picea abies). The HMPR method preferentially removes the repetitive fraction of the genome, which is commonly hypermethylated. Hence, RRLs should be enriched for the hypomethylated gene space. For comparison a standard shotgun library was constructed and samples of the respective libraries were obtained...

Data from: Integrating genetic analysis of mixed populations with a spatially-explicit population dynamics model

Rebecca Whitlock, Samu Mäntyniemi, Stefan Palm, Marja-Liisa Koljenen, Johan Dannewitz, Johan Östergren & Marja-Liisa Koljonen
Inferring the dynamics of populations in time and space is a central challenge in ecology. Intra-specific structure (for example genetically distinct sub-populations or meta-populations) may require methods that can jointly infer the dynamics of multiple populations. This is of particular importance for harvested species, for which management must balance utilization of productive populations with protection of weak ones. Here we present a novel method for simultaneous learning about the spatio-temporal dynamics of multiple populations that...

Data from: Differences in endophyte communities of introduced trees depend on the phylogenetic relatedness of the receiving forest

Michael J. Gundale, Juan P. Almeida, Håkan Wallander, David A. Wardle, Paul Kardol, Marie-Charlotte Nilsson Hegethorn, Alex Fajardo, Anibal Pauchard, Duane A. Peltzer, Seppo Ruotsalainen, Bill Mason, Nicholas Rosenstock & Marie-Charlotte Nilsson
Plant species sometimes perform extraordinarily well when introduced to new environments, through achieving higher growth rates, individual biomasses or higher densities in their receiving communities compared to their native range communities. One hypothesis proposed to explain enhanced performance in species’ new environments is that their soil microbial communities may be different and provide greater benefit than microbial communities encountered in species’ native environments. However, detailed descriptions of soil biota associated with species in both their...

Data from: Plant-pollinator networks in semi-natural grasslands are resistant to the loss of pollinators during blooming of mass-flowering crops

Ainhoa Magrach, Anna Holzschuh, Ignasi Bartomeus, Verena Riedinger, Stuart P.M. Roberts, , Ante Vujic, Jennifer B. Wickens, Victoria J. Wickens, Riccardo Bommarco, Juan P. Gonzalez-Varo, Simon G. Potts, Henrik G. Smith, Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter, Montserrat Vilà, Andrea Holzschuh & Stuart P. M. Roberts
Mass-flowering crops lead to spatial redistributions of pollinators and to transient shortages within nearby semi-natural grasslands, but the impacts on plant-pollinator interactions remain largely unexplored. Here, we characterised which pollinator species are attracted by oilseed rape and how this affected the structure of plant-pollinator networks in nearby grasslands. We surveyed 177 networks from three countries (Germany, Sweden and United Kingdom) in 24 landscapes with high crop cover, and compared them to 24 landscapes with low...

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