45 Works

Data from: Effects of water level and grassland management on alpha and beta diversity of wet grassland birds in restored wetlands

Åke Berg, Michał Żmihorski, Tomas Pärt & Tomas Gustafson
Nearly 60% of European wetlands have been lost to drainage or to the cessation of grassland management. Large amounts of resources are put into wetland restoration with the aim to recover biodiversity. However, few studies have simultaneously evaluated effects of management, wetness and flooding dynamics on biodiversity of restored wetlands such as seasonally flooded wet grasslands. We inventoried bird communities over 4 years at 137 sites (each 3·1 ha) within five restored wet grassland areas...

Data from: Inorganic fungicides as routinely applied in organic and conventional agriculture can increase palatability but reduce microbial decomposition of leaf litter

Jochen P. Zubrod, Alexander Feckler, Dominic Englert, Natalia Koksharova, Ricki R. Rosenfeldt, Frank Seitz, Ralf Schulz & Mirco Bundschuh
1. The application of fungicides is considered an indispensable measure to secure crop production. These substances, however, may unintentionally enter surface waters via runoff, potentially affecting the microbial community. To assess such risks adequately, authorities recently called for suitable test designs involving relevant aquatic microorganisms. 2. We assessed the structural and functional responses of leaf-associated microbial communities, which play a key role in the breakdown of allochthonous leaf material in streams, towards the inorganic fungicides...

Data from: Disentangling the ‘brown world’ faecal-detritus interaction web: dung beetle effects on soil microbial properties

Eleanor M. Slade, Tomas Roslin, Minna Santalahti & Thomas Bell
Many ecosystem services are sustained by the combined action of microscopic and macroscopic organisms, and shaped by interactions between the two. However, studies tend to focus on only one of these two components. We combined the two by investigating the impact of macrofauna on microbial community composition and functioning in the context of a major ecosystem process: the decomposition of dung. We compared bacterial communities of pasture soil and experimental dung pats inhabited by one...

Data from: Genome-wide association study of insect bite hypersensitivity in Swedish-born Icelandic horses

Merina Shrestha, Susanne Eriksson, Anouk Schurink, Lisa S. Andersson, Marie Sundquist, Rebecka Frey, Hans Broström, Tomas Bergström, Bart Ducro & Gabriella Lindgren
Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is the most common allergic skin disease in horses and is caused by biting midges, mainly of the genus Culicoides. The disease predominantly comprises a type I hypersensitivity reaction, causing severe itching and discomfort that reduce the welfare and commercial value of the horse. It is a multifactorial disorder influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, with heritability ranging from 0.16 to 0.27 in various horse breeds. The worldwide prevalence in...

Data from: Comparing analysis methods in functional calcium imaging of the insect brain

Anna Balkenius, Anders J. Johansson & Christian Balkenius
We investigate four different methods for background estimation in calcium imaging of the insect brain and evaluate their performance on six data sets consisting of data recorded from two sites in two species of moths. The calcium fluorescence decay curve outside the potential response is estimated using either a low-pass filter or constant, linear or polynomial regression, and is subsequently used to calculate the magnitude, latency and duration of the response. The magnitude and variance...

Data from: The shepherds' tale: a genome-wide study across 9 dog breeds implicates two loci in the regulation of fructosamine serum concentration in Belgian shepherds

Simon K. G. Forsberg, Marcin Kierczak, Ingrid Ljungvall, Anne-Christine Merveille, Vassiliki Gouni, Maria Wiberg, Jakob Lundgren Willesen, Sofia Hanås, Anne-Sophie Lequarré, Louise Mejer Sørensen, Laurent Tiret, Kathleen McEntee, Eija Seppälä, Jørgen Koch, Géraldine Battaille, Hannes Lohi, Merete Fredholm, Valerie Chetboul, Jens Häggström, Örjan Carlborg, Kerstin Lindblad-Toh & Katja Höglund
Diabetes mellitus is a serious health problem in both dogs and humans. Certain dog breeds show high prevalence of the disease, whereas other breeds are at low risk. Fructosamine and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) are two major biomarkers of glycaemia where serum concentrations reflect glucose turnover over the past few weeks to months. In this study, we searched for genetic factors influencing variation in serum fructosamine concentration in healthy dogs using data from nine dog breeds....

Data from: Sexual antagonism in the pistil varies among populations of a hermaphroditic mixed-mating plant

Evan Hersh, Josefin A. Madjidian, Stefan Andersson, Maria Strandh, W. Scott Armbruster & Åsa Lankinen
Sexual conflicts and their evolutionary outcomes may be influenced by population-specific features such as mating system and ecological context; however, very few studies have investigated the link between sexual conflict and mating system. The self-compatible, mixed-mating hermaphrodite Collinsia heterophylla (Plantaginaceae) is thought to exhibit a sexual conflict over timing of stigma receptivity. This conflict involves 1) delayed stigma receptivity, which intensifies pollen competition, and 2) early fertilization forced by pollen, which reduces seed set. We...

Data from: Experimental evidence that the effectiveness of conservation biological control depends on landscape complexity

Mattias Jonsson, Cory S. Straub, Raphael K. Didham, Hannah L. Buckley, Bradley S. Case, Roddy J. Hale, Claudio Gratton & Steve D. Wratten
1. The expansion of intensive agricultural practices is a major threat to biodiversity and to the delivery of ecosystem services on which humans depend. Local-scale conservation management strategies, such as agri-environment schemes to preserve biodiversity, have been widely adopted to reduce the negative impacts of agricultural intensification. However, it is likely that the effectiveness of these local-scale management actions depend on the structure and composition of the surrounding landscape. 2. We experimentally tested the utility...

Data from: Time for recovery of riparian plants in restored northern Swedish streams: a chronosequence study

Eliza Maher Hasselquist, Christer Nilsson, Joakim Hjältén, Dolly Jørgensen, Lovisa Lind & Lina E. Polvi
A lack of ecological responses in stream restoration projects has been prevalent throughout recent literature with many studies reporting insufficient time for recovery. We assessed the relative importance of time, site variables, and landscape setting for understanding how plant species richness and understory productivity recover over time in riparian zones of northern Swedish streams. We used a space-for-time substitution consisting of 13 stream reaches restored 5–25 years ago, as well as five unrestored channelized reference...

Data from: Mesoclosures – increasing realism in mesocosm studies of ecosystem functioning

Saija Lähteenmäki, Eleanor M. Slade, Bess Hardwick, Gustavo Schiffler, Júlio Louzada, Jos Barlow & Tomas Roslin
1. Experimental studies linking community composition to functioning are typically confined to small and closed micro- or mesocosms. Such restricted conditions may affect both species’ biology and their environment. Yet, targeting simple features in the behaviour of species may circumvent these constraints. Focusing on ecological functions provided by dung beetles, we test whether large, open-top cages – MESOCLOSURES – will intercept the flight trajectories of beetles, thereby allowing manipulation of local community composition. 2. MESOCLOSURES...

Data from: Comparative multi-locus phylogeography of two Palaearctic spruce bark beetles: influence of contrasting ecological strategies on genetic variation

François Mayer, Frédéric B. Piel, Anna Cassel-Lundhagen, Natalia Kirichenko, Laurent Grumiau, Bjørn Økland, Coralie Bertheau, Jean-Claude Grégoire & Patrick Mardulyn
While phylogeographic patterns of organisms are often interpreted through past environmental disturbances, mediated by climate changes, and geographic barriers, they may also be strongly influenced by species-specific traits. To investigate the impact of such traits, we focused on two Eurasian spruce bark beetles that share a similar geographic distribution, but differ in their ecology and reproduction. Ips typographus is an aggressive tree-killing species characterized by strong dispersal, whereas Dendroctonus micans is a discrete inbreeding species...

Data from: Tolerance to deer herbivory and resistance to insect herbivores in the common evening primrose (Oenothera biennis)

Adriana Puentes & Marc T. J. Johnson
The evolution of plant defence in response to herbivory will depend on the fitness effects of damage, availability of genetic variation, and potential ecological and genetic constraints on defence. Here we examine the potential for evolution of tolerance to deer herbivory in Oenothera biennis while simultaneously considering resistance to natural insect herbivores. We examined: i) the effects of deer damage on fitness; ii) the presence of genetic variation in tolerance and resistance; iii) selection on...

Data from: Establishing a community-wide DNA barcode library as a new tool for arctic research

H. Wirta, G. Várkonyi, C. Rasmussen, R. Kaartinen, N. M. Schmidt, P. D. N. Hebert, M. Barták, G. Blagoev, H. Disney, S. Ertl, P. Gjelstrup, D. J. Gwiazdowicz, L. Huldén, J. Ilmonen, J. Jakovlev, M. Jaschhof, J. Kahanpää, T. Kankaanpää, P. H. Krogh, R. Labbee, C. Lettner, V. Michelsen, S. A. Nielsen, T. R. Nielsen, L. Paasivirta … & T. Roslin
DNA sequences offer powerful tools for describing the members and interactions of natural communities. In this study, we establish the to-date most comprehensive library of DNA barcodes for a terrestrial site, including all known macroscopic animals and vascular plants of an intensively studied area of the High Arctic, the Zackenberg Valley in Northeast Greenland. To demonstrate its utility, we apply the library to identify nearly 20 000 arthropod individuals from two Malaise traps, each operated...

Data from: Patterns of domestication in the Ethiopian oil-seed crop Noug (Guizotia abyssinica)

Hannes Dempewolf, Misteru Tesfaye, Abel Teshome, Anne Bjorkman, Rose L. Andrew, Moira Scascitelli, Scott Black, Endashaw Bekele, Johannes M. M. Engels, Quentin C. B. Cronk, Loren H. Rieseberg & Anne D. Bjorkman
Noug (Guizotia abyssinica) is a semi-domesticated oil-seed crop, which is primarily cultivated in Ethiopia. Unlike its closest crop relative, sunflower, noug has small seeds, small flowering heads, many branches, many flowering heads, indeterminate flowering, and it shatters in the field. Here we conducted common garden studies and microsatellite analyses of genetic variation to test whether high levels of crop-wild gene flow and/or unfavorable phenotypic correlations have hindered noug domestication. With the exception of one population,...

Data from: Contrasting the roles of section length and instream habitat enhancement for river restoration success: a field study on 20 European restoration projects

Daniel Hering, Jukka Aroviita, Annette Baattrup-Pedersen, Karel Brabec, Tom Buijse, Frauke Ecke, Nikolai Friberg, Marek Gielczewski, Kathrin Januschke, Jan Köhler, Benjamin Kupilas, Armin W. Lorenz, Susanne Muhar, Amael Paillex, Michaela Poppe, Torsten Schmidt, Stefan Schmutz, Jan Vermaat, Piet F. M. Verdonschot, Ralf C. M. Verdonschot, Jochem Kail & Christian Wolter
1. Restoration of river hydromorphology often has limited detected effects on river biota. One frequently discussed reason is that the restored river length is insufficient to allow populations to develop and give the room for geomorphologic processes to occur. 2. We investigated ten pairs of restored river sections of which one was a large project involving a long, intensively restored river section and one represented a smaller restoration effort. The restoration effect was quantified by...

Data from: Different DMRT3 genotypes are best adapted for harness racing and riding in Finnhorses

Kim Jäderkvist Fegraeus, Lisa Johansson, Minna Mäenpää, Anna Mykkänen, Lisa S. Andersson, Brandon D. Velie, Leif Andersson, Thorvaldur Árnason & Gabriella Lindgren
Previous studies showed a positive effect of the DMRT3 “gait keeper” mutation on harness racing performance in Standardbreds, French-, and Nordic trotters. The mutation has also been shown to influence riding traits in multiple breeds. This study investigated the effect of the DMRT3 mutation on harness racing performance and riding traits in Finnhorses. Finnhorses used for harness racing (n = 180) and for riding (n = 59) were genotyped for the DMRT3 mutation. For the...

Data from: Specialists in ancient trees are more affected by climate than generalists

Leonie A. Gough, Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson, Per Milberg, Hanne E. Pilskog, Niclas Jansson, Mats Jonsell, Tone Birkemoe & Nicklas Jansson
Ancient trees are considered one of the most important habitats for biodiversity in Europe and North America. They support exceptional numbers of specialized species, including a range of rare and endangered wood-living insects. In this study, we use a dataset of 105 sites spanning a climatic gradient along the oak range of Norway and Sweden to investigate the importance of temperature and precipitation on beetle species richness in ancient, hollow oak trees. We expected that...

Data from: Linkage of plant trait space to successional age and species richness in boreal forest understory vegetation

Bright B. Kumordzi, Francesco De Bello, Grégoire Freschet, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Jan Lepš & David A. Wardle
Determining the changes in within- and between-species functional diversity in plant communities, and their contribution to overall species trait overlap, can enhance efforts at understanding mechanisms of species coexistence. However, little is known about how variation in species functional diversity influences variation in species trait overlap among contrasting environments. Here, we studied the understorey vegetation in a well-characterized 5000-year-old chronosequence involving 30 forested islands that differ greatly in size, soil fertility, and species diversity. Across...

Data from: Air humidity thresholds trigger active moss spore release to extend dispersal in space and time

Victor Johansson, Niklas Lönnell, Üllar Rannik, Sebastian Sundberg & Kristoffer Hylander
1. Understanding the complete dispersal process is important for making realistic predictions of species distributions, but mechanisms for diaspore release in wind-dispersed species are often unknown. However, diaspore release under conditions that increase the probability of longer dispersal distances and mechanisms that extend dispersal events in time may have evolutionary advantages. 2. We quantified air humidity thresholds regulating spore release in the moss Brachythecium rutabulum. We also investigated the prevailing micrometeorological conditions when these thresholds...

Data from: The contemporary genetic pattern of European moose is shaped by postglacial recolonization, bottlenecks, and the geographical barrier of the Baltic Sea

Magdalena Niedziałkowska, Kris J. Hundertmark, Bogumiła Jędrzejewska, Vadim E. Sidorovich, Hanna Zalewska, Rauno Veeroja, Erling J. Solberg, Sauli Laaksonen, Håkan Sand, Vyacheslav A. Solovyev, Andrey Sagaydak, Juha Tiainen, Rimvydas Juškaitis, Gundega Done, Vadim A. Borodulin, Evgenii A. Tulandin & Krzysztof Niedziałkowski
To investigate genetic diversity and the population structure of the European moose (Alces alces), we analyzed 14 microsatellite loci for 694 samples collected across 16 localities. The highest genetic diversity was detected in Belarus and Russia and the lowest was found in Scandinavia. Two major genetic clusters existed, Scandinavian and continental, and some further spatial structure was detected. There was high concordance between the spatial distribution of microsatellite clusters analyzed in the present study and...

Data from: Generation of a neutral FST baseline for testing local adaptation on gill-raker number within and between European whitefish ecotypes in the Baltic Sea basin

Mikhail Yu Ozerov, Mikael Himberg, Tutku Aykanat, Dmitry S. Sendek, Henry Hägerstrand, Aare Verliin, Teet Krause, Jens Olsson, Craig R. Primmer & Anti Vasemägi
Divergent selection at ecologically important traits is thought to be a major factor driving phenotypic differentiation between populations. To elucidate the role of different evolutionary processes shaping the variation in gill-raker number of European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus sensu lato) in the Baltic Sea basin, we assessed the relationships between genetic and phenotypic variation among and within three whitefish ecotypes (sea-, river and lake-spawners). To generate expected neutral distribution of FST and to evaluate whether highly...

Data from: Combined observational and experimental data provide limited support for facilitation in lichens

Måns Svensson, Alexandro Caruso, Rebecca Yahr, Christopher Ellis, Göran Thor & Tord Snäll
It is increasingly recognized that facilitative interactions can shape communities. One of the mechanisms through which facilitation may operate is when one species facilitates the colonization of another through the exchange of shared symbionts. Lichens are symbiotic associations composed of a mycobiont (lichenised-fungus) and one or two photobionts (algae or cyanobacteria). Different lichen species may have overlapping specificity for photobionts, creating the possibility that facilitation drives lichen community assembly. To investigate whether facilitation occurs in...

Data from: Low genetic diversity despite multiple introductions of the invasive plant species Impatiens glandulifera in Europe

Jenny Hagenblad, Jennifer Hülskötter, Kamal Prasad Acharya, Jörg Brunet, Olivier Chabrerie, Sara A. O. Cousins, Pervaiz A. Dar, Martin Diekmann, Pieter De Frenne, Martin Hermy, Aurélien Jamoneau, Annette Kolb, Isgard Lemke, Jan Plue, Zafar A. Reshi & Bente Jessen Graae
Background: Invasive species can be a major threat to native biodiversity and the number of invasive plant species is increasing across the globe. Population genetic studies of invasive species can provide key insights into their invasion history and ensuing evolution, but also for their control. Here we genetically characterise populations of Impatiens glandulifera, an invasive plant in Europe that can have a major impact on native plant communities. We compared populations from the species’ native...

Data from: Convergence of soil nitrogen isotopes across global climate gradients

Joseph M. Craine, Andrew J. Elmore, Lixin Wang, Laurent Augusto, W. Troy Baisden, E. N. J. Brookshire, Michael D. Cramer, Niles J. Hasselquist, Erik A. Hobbie, Ansgar Kahmen, Keisuke Koba, J. Marty Kranabetter, Michelle C. Mack, Erika Marin-Spiotta, Jordan R. Mayor, Kendra K. McLauchlan, Anders Michelsen, Gabriela B. Nardoto, Rafael S. Oliveira, Steven S. Perakis, Pablo L. Peri, Carlos A. Quesada, Andreas Richter, Louis A. Schipper, Bryan A. Stevenson … & Bernd Zeller
Quantifying global patterns of terrestrial nitrogen (N) cycling is central to predicting future patterns of primary productivity, carbon sequestration, nutrient fluxes to aquatic systems, and climate forcing. With limited direct measures of soil N cycling at the global scale, syntheses of the 15N:14N ratio of soil organic matter across climate gradients provide key insights into understanding global patterns of N cycling. In synthesizing data from over 6000 soil samples, we show strong global relationships among...

Data from: Individual and temporal variation in habitat association of an alien carnivore at its invasion front

Claudia Melis, Ivar Herfindal, Fredrik Dahl & Per-Arne Åhlén
Gathering information on how invasive species utilize the habitat is important, in order to better aim actions to reduce their negative impact. We studied habitat use and selection of 55 GPS-marked raccoon dogs (30 males, 25 females) at their invasion front in Northern Sweden, with particular focus on differences between males and females, between movement states, and between seasons and times of the day. Daily movement pattern was used to classify GPS-locations into dispersing and...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    45

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    45

Affiliations

  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    45
  • Lund University
    6
  • University of Copenhagen
    6
  • University of Helsinki
    6
  • Uppsala University
    6
  • Umeå University
    6
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • Stockholm University
    3
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    3
  • Finnish Environment Institute
    2